WowBB Forums Home 
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register
WowBB Forums > Sports And Wrestling > Sports Talk > NHL 2014-15 Season Thread

 Moderated by: Ron, brodiescomics, beejmi Page:  First Page Previous Page  ...  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  ...  Next Page Last Page  
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
NHL 2014-15 Season Thread  Rating:  Rating
AuthorPost
 Posted: Thu Nov 6th, 2014 06:10 pm
  PM Quote Reply
106th Post
lobo316



Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Raptorville
Posts: 43530
Status: 
Offline
The Chicago Blackhawks steamrolled over the Montreal Canadiens, 5-0, on Tuesday night thanks to a pair of goals from Kris Versteeg and a shutout from starting goalie Corey Crawford. The win was also a costly one due to the injury suffered by forward Patrick Sharp, and it's one that could keep him sidelined for a while.

Sharp had to leave the game mid-way through the third period after he was hit along the boards by Canadiens defenseman Alexei Emelin and was pinched against the boards, suffering an apparent leg injury.

After the game Blackhawks coach Joel Quenneville said that Sharp will be "out for a bit," while Chris Kuc of the Chicago Tribune reports that he could miss "weeks" rather than days.

Sharp is one of the most consistent and productive players in the league and has scored at least 33 goals in three of the past four seasons. The only year he fell short of that mark was the lockout shortened 2012-13 season when he was limited to just six goals in 28 games.

So far this season he has three goals and five assists in eight games.

The Blackhawks had been a bit of a goal-scoring drought heading into Tuesday with only 12 goals over their past seven games, but finally broke through against the Canadiens.

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Fri Nov 7th, 2014 02:32 am
  PM Quote Reply
107th Post
lobo316



Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Raptorville
Posts: 43530
Status: 
Offline
Toronto Maple Leafs forward Carter Ashton has been suspended 20 games for violating the NHL's performance-enhancing substance policy.

"The suspension is accompanied by mandatory referral to the NHL/NHLPA Program for Substance Abuse and Behavioral Health for evaluation and possible treatment," per an NHL release.

Ashton will forfeit $169,185 during the suspension.

The 23-year-old Ashton released a statement regarding the suspension, claiming he suffered an asthmatic spasm in late August during summer training and was given an inhaler by another player. Ashton kept the inhaler and used it a second time early in training camp after another asthma attack.

"Unfortunately, I incorrectly assumed that there were no problems associated with the use of this inhaler and I used it without checking to see whether its contents were permissible under the NHL/NHLPA Performance Enhancing Substances Program," Ashton said in his statement.

"I now recognize that I ingested Clenbuterol, a prohibited substance, through the inhaler. However, at no time was I seeking to gain an athletic advantage or to knowingly violate the terms of the program. I used the inhaler in response to exercise-induced asthma, a condition that my doctor with the Toronto Maple Leafs has since diagnosed and he has prescribed me with an inhaler."

Ashton has been held pointless in three games with the Maple Leafs this season, spending the majority of the season to-date in the Leafs' press box.

"As a professional hockey player, I recognize that I am responsible for what I put into my body, and I will not appeal my suspension. While I am extremely disappointed that I have let my teammates, our fans and the Maple Leafs organization down, I will work very hard during my suspension to stay in game shape so that I can help out the team when I am able to return.”

Team President Brendan Shanahan released a statement Thursday, backing the League's decision. He added that no further comments would be made out of respect for Ashton and the "process involved."

Acquired from the Tampa Bay Lightning at the 2012 NHL trade deadline, Ashton has spent parts of the past three seasons with the Maple Leafs, registering three assists in 50 games. He was originally selected in the first round (29th overall) by the Tampa Bay Lightning in the 2009 NHL Entry Draft.

Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Fri Nov 7th, 2014 02:34 am
  PM Quote Reply
108th Post
lobo316



Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Raptorville
Posts: 43530
Status: 
Offline
OTTAWA - Minnesota Wild star Zach Parise has a concussion that will keep him out indefinitely.

Parise did not travel with the Wild on their three-game road trip, starting Thursday in Ottawa. Coach Mike Yeo confirmed the diagnosis to reporters after the team's morning skate, calling the injury "obviously a big blow" to the Wild. Parise was hurt Tuesday during a 4-1 defeat by Pittsburgh. Yeo said the concussion came on during the course of the game.

Thomas Vanek will move up to the first line and play left wing in place of Parise, next to Mikael Granlund and Jason Pominville.

Parise has four goals and six assists, a team-high 10 points in 11 games.

The Wild also travelled without left wing Matt Cooke (lower body) and defenceman Jared Spurgeon (upper body).

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Fri Nov 7th, 2014 02:51 am
  PM Quote Reply
109th Post
CanadianHorseman



Joined: Fri Nov 2nd, 2007
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia Canada
Posts: 14026
Status: 
Offline
from today's sportsnet.ca:


30 Thoughts from Elliotte Friedman


1. At the San Jose meetings, the NHL, NHLPA and teams looked at virtual reality technology from OTOY, a California-based company. Basically, OTOY tries to create 3D graphics and pictures in real time. The league may test this at the outdoor games, with the idea of providing a 360-degree HD view from the bench or the penalty box. Remember when ColecoVision was cool?

2. Had a funny conversation with a GM last weekend. Heard he was looking for a defenceman. He responded with, “Everyone is looking for a defenceman.” Montreal is checking to see what’s out there. The decimated Rangers are bringing in Tomas Kaberle, with no contract offer. Philadelphia’s search, before signing Carlo Colaiacovo, was exhaustive. “Name someone,” one agent said. “They considered him.” The same GM quoted above talked to a team with eight, one-way contracts on its blueline, only to be told none were available. “They wanted to keep all of them,” he said.

3. Heading into Wednesday’s game against Buffalo, it would not have been a surprise if Canadiens GM Marc Bergevin was thinking about moving one of his 14 forwards so Michael Bournival or Jiri Sekac could play more. Bournival was injured on a hard (but clean) Cody McCormick check, while Sekac might be right back in Michel Therrien’s doghouse after a third-period penalty. Can’t imagine the Canadiens want Sekac, in particular, sitting.

4. Therrien had an interesting quote after the listless 2-1 shootout win, telling reporters, “There’s not much I didn’t like about our team tonight…I thought we played a solid game.” That’s a light touch for the Canadiens coach; he undoubtedly realized he needed to take the foot off the gas following back-to-back ugly losses against Calgary and Chicago. You wonder if both the coach and the players are adjusting to the loss of Gerard Gallant on the bench. Gallant was an important conduit between Therrien and the dressing room. Therrien, who wields a hammer, needs that buffer.

5. My first real “beat” in the business was the inaugural Toronto Raptors (1995-96). Their head coach, Brendan Malone, waited almost 30 years for his NBA chance. It became very clear, very quickly that he wanted to win more than the team did. It led to an ugly public battle with GM Isiah Thomas, as the organization shut down Rookie of the Year Damon Stoudamire because it was worried Malone was overusing the player. They fired him after the season. Watching Ted Nolan publicly criticize his Sabres twice now reminds me of that situation. He’s competitive. He knows this could be his last chance. The team is comfortable with one more ugly year. Nolan isn’t. It’s not going to be easy.

6. The Rangers are one of several clubs waiting to see what the Hurricanes decide with Andrej Sekera. There’s no guarantee that comes quickly, especially now that Carolina is healthier and stabilized. Depending on what happens with Slava Voynov, opponents think Los Angeles could be interested, too. Also heard some talk about Zbynek Michalek, a different player than Sekera, but a right-hand shot. Coyotes GM Don Maloney wouldn’t bite on an inquiry about it.

7. Whenever Keith Yandle’s name surfaces in rumours, I go back to an old Maloney line about him: “If we trade him, you will (hear the deal) and understand why.” The only difference now is his contract, which only has one more year. Does that change the dynamic? The Coyotes know so much of their offence comes in transition from he and Oliver Ekman-Larsson. If they do it, can they replace what he brings now, or is that step one of a long-term build?

8. It sounds like there’s a lot of, “We better make sure we’re ready in case Team X decides to move someone we like.” Here’s another example: There is zero evidence Winnipeg is interested in anything involving either Dustin Byfuglien or Andrew Ladd, but opponents are watching (Like Yandle, both are free after next season). The Jets know Ladd’s trade list (15 clubs), but have to ask for five acceptable teams from Byfuglien should they ever decide to move him. Winnipeg just won three big games and you know they’re going for it. As long as they’re in the race, there’s no reason to expect change.

9. The Jets’ 1-0 win Sunday in Chicago was some of their best defensive play since they moved back to Canada, and not just because of the shutout. Shots in the third were 13-9 Blackhawks, but aside from a flurry in the first minute, the Jets did a fantastic job protecting that lead in a tough place to win. They consistently beat Chicago to rebounds, getting the puck out of the zone and into areas where they could change without getting into trouble. None of the shots came from Duncan Keith or Jonathan Toews. Patrick Kane had one; Marian Hossa none in the last 19 minutes. The Jets haven’t always paid attention to detail, but sure did that night.

10. Apparently, Ryan Whitney told teams he wanted to play a few KHL contests to get the blood flowing before considering a North American offer. He’s got three points in three games. The only problem with Whitney now is he has to clear waivers in the NHL. With all the lusting after defencemen, that may not be easy.

11. There were rumours last week that Dallas, with Anders Lindback struggling, might look at signing Martin Brodeur. GM Jim Nill denied that.

12. As the injuries mounted last week, Calgary called up Sven Baertschi from Adirondack. His numbers were ugly in the AHL, just three points (no goals) in 10 games. Even worse, a few teams that saw him were exceedingly unimpressed, with one suggesting he wouldn’t want Baertschi near his other prospects. The Flames defended the forward against accusations that his attitude was bad. “Was he unhappy to be there? Yes, initially he was, but we could understand that,” said GM Brad Treliving. “To say he was causing problems, that’s not fair.” Treliving added that there is room in Calgary for Baertschi’s skill-set. He is exempt from waivers for another year or so. That’s probably the real deadline for him in southern Alberta.

13. One exec whose team played the Hurricanes already this season said no player needed something good to happen more than second-year forward Elias Lindholm. The 19-year-old had an assist in the opener, then went pointless in seven. “He was trying, but nothing good was happening,” the exec said. “You could see how it effected him.” Lindholm had five points in Carolina’s three wins, breaking the schneid just as his team did.

14. Can’t help but wonder if there is a Kovalchuk-like solution to Carolina’s detente with Alexander Semin. No way this can last 317 more games, can it?

15. So, Radim Vrbata, what did you like best: the goggles, the bucket, or the skis?





“The skis,” he said. Why? “Because we won,” he laughed. Since the ski race was worth the most points of the three team-building tests, Vrbata’s group didn’t have to do extra skating following the next practice.

16. Vrbata said the Sedins really didn’t have many special instructions about fitting in with them. After a couple of exhibition games, the linemates made sure that whoever was in the middle on a rush made sure to drive the net. Other than that? “We decided we have to shoot more,” Vrbata said. Even Henrik? Vrbata paused, and you could hear the smile forming on his face over the phone. “When they said we have to shoot more, they were really saying I have to shoot more.”

17. Marc-Andre Fleury’s new contract includes a no-move clause to protect against waivers. He can be dealt, but is allowed to provide a 12-team no-trade list. A lot of bandwidth is already destroyed arguing this one, but it is clear the Penguins do believe their desire to hold the puck more will make Fleury a better goalie.

18. As Derek Stepan returns, the Rangers are excited about getting Martin St. Louis back to his regular routine. He took 92 face-offs in the first 10 games; only Derick Brassard and Dominic Moore had more. St. Louis had one goal and five assists. After last Saturday’s 1-0 loss to Winnipeg, New York eased his load. He took just two draws against the Blues and none versus Detroit, totalling three goals and one assist. As a centre, “he is always late on the rush, because we need him down low in the defensive zone,” associate coach Scott Arniel said. “Now he is free to lead the rush.”

19. Another centre experiment on hold for now — Montreal’s Alex Galchenyuk. Word is they feel he’s not as instinctive in the middle, and don’t want him overthinking.

20. The last time Boston extended Claude Julien, it was July 2012. Look at the coaching contracts signed since then: Lindy Ruff, John Tortorella and Alain Vigneault (among others) broke the $2 million mark and Joel Quenneville is believed to reach $3 million in his new deal. Boston looked at the landscape and made the easy decision to put Julien in that class.

21. A lot of interesting reaction to Kris Versteeg’s goal in Chicago’s 5-4 win over Ottawa last week. Players on both teams were astonished when Erik Karlsson chased down Kris Versteeg on the breakaway. “We couldn’t believe he caught him,” Clarke Macarthur said. “He had this little smile on his face like he knew he was going to do it.” “I was like, ‘Holy Crap,’” Versteeg said. “How did he get here?”

22. After initially losing the puck, Versteeg got it back. He scored, making Karlsson look foolish on a fake. “Obviously, he thought I was going to shoot it,” the Chicago forward said. PJ Stock did a great segment last weekend, illustrating both the good and bad of Karlsson’s game. Stock showed how Karlsson gets into trouble in his own zone, because he “always looks for an offensive play out of a defensive situation.” One example was Karlsson taking himself out of position by protecting against a pass he thought he could intercept — a pass that never came. This is the next evolution for him.

23. MacArthur gave good insight into playing in front of Craig Anderson and Robin Lehner. The two goalies have slightly different requests of the defenders in front of them. Anderson wants shot blockers to go low, and leave the high heat for him. Lehner simply wants you to get out of his way so he can handle the shot. “And he does it in a booming Swedish voice,” MacArthur said.

24. Versteeg, by the way, remains interested in buying the WHL’s Lethbridge Hurricanes. The news is all bad for the community-owned club, which has lost almost $2 million and hasn’t made the playoffs since 2009-10. At the team’s annual meeting in September, a motion was put forward to sell the team to private ownership, with a vote coming next fall. Born in the city, Versteeg played three seasons of junior hockey there.

25. Seventeen years ago, WHL Portland head coach Brent Peterson said he didn’t know what to expect when first-round NHL draft pick Marian Hossa showed up from Ottawa to join the Winterhawks. The team had two Slovak players, Hossa and Andrej Podkonicky, so it hired a Slovak coach, Julius Supler, to help — although there was an English-only rule around the team. “The first practice, you knew how good he was,” Peterson said last week, as Hossa hit the 1,000-point mark.

26. What stood out for Peterson was how much abuse Hossa took without complaint. Portland won the Memorial Cup that season without a true enforcer, as no one had more than 200 penalty minutes. “He was the target for every other team,” the coach said. “He just played through it.” Things haven’t changed. A Hall of Famer in my book, for sure.

27. One scout had a good line about Hossa and the Blackhawks: “They love being on the ice with him. They know he’ll backcheck hard and cover up their mistakes.”

28. Despite 152 games the last two seasons, including two late-spring finishes, Patrick Kane was back on the ice in June. Can’t find another player who was skating again so quickly.

29. There were some teams who did not like seeing the four officials get together to overturn a tripping penalty to Jarret Stoll last week in Pittsburgh (Brandon Sutter fell on his own before a collision with Stoll). “A slippery slope,” one GM said, although one referee responded, “There’s nothing in the rule book that says we can’t do it.” My sense is the league is willing to allow it, since it’s already an option on disputed goals. Why not? Don’t see a problem, especially if it leads to more correct calls.

30. If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you know I track a certain post-season stat: teams more than four points out of the playoffs on Nov. 1 face a serious fight to get in. Since 2003-04, only five clubs out of 40 that far behind on that date made it. The challenge this season goes to Edmonton (five points back), Arizona and Buffalo (seven back), and Carolina (10). Winnipeg was five from the wild card, but just three in arrears of Minnesota for third in the Central. Therefore, upon further review, the Jets don’t count. The good news for this year’s qualifiers is that two teams did it last year, Dallas and Philadelphia.



____________________
Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Mon Nov 10th, 2014 03:33 am
  PM Quote Reply
110th Post
lobo316



Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Raptorville
Posts: 43530
Status: 
Offline
WILMINGTON, Mass. -- Add David Warsofsky to the list of injured Bruins defensemen.

Warsofsky did not practice with the team Friday morning at Ristuccia Arena, and coach Claude Julien said he expects Warsofsky to be out "a while" with an undisclosed injury.

Warsofsky logged 15 minutes of ice time during Thursday's 5-2 win over the Edmonton Oilers at TD Garden. Warsofsky joins Zdeno Chara (knee), Torey Krug (finger) and Kevan Miller (shoulder) as the team's injured blueliners. Krug practiced with the team Friday and said afterward he hopes to be back in the lineup soon.

"It's doing well," Krug said. "It's coming along nicely and made some good progress the last couple of days. It's great to be back on the ice with my teammates, and competing and everything like that. It's feeling better, that's for sure."

Miller was on the ice prior to the team's practice and is progressing.

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Mon Nov 10th, 2014 03:34 am
  PM Quote Reply
111th Post
lobo316



Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Raptorville
Posts: 43530
Status: 
Offline
BUFFALO, N.Y. -- Longtime Buffalo Sabres announcer Rick Jeanneret said Friday night that he's free of the throat cancer he was diagnosed with during the summer.

On the television broadcast before the "Hockey Fights Cancer" game against the Edmonton Oilers, Jeanneret said he was told this week that the cancer was gone. The 72-year-old native of Ontario is missing the start of the season as he gets radiation treatment.

Jeanneret took part in a ceremonial puck drop with former Buffalo Bills quarterback Jim Kelly, who was declared free of jaw cancer in September.

Jeanneret, who received the Foster Hewitt Memorial Award two years ago for outstanding contributions as a hockey broadcaster, started calling games for the Sabres in the 1971-72 season, the team's second in the NHL.

Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Mon Nov 10th, 2014 03:35 am
  PM Quote Reply
112th Post
lobo316



Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Raptorville
Posts: 43530
Status: 
Offline
MONTREAL -- The Montreal Canadiens retired Guy Lapointe's No. 5, raising it to the Bell Centre rafters alongside those of fellow defensive standouts Larry Robinson and Serge Savard, prior to the Habs' 4-1 win over the Minnesota Wild.

The Big Three starred for the Canadiens during the 1970s, and the trio was reunited before Saturday night's game. The 66-year-old Lapointe was in tears with his family and his defense mates at his side.

"I'm happy he's being honored while he's alive," said Yvan Cournoyer, one of several teammates, including Savard, Robinson, Rejean Houle, Pierre Bouchard, Pierre Mondou, Yvon Lambert and Mario Tremblay, who were expected to attend the ceremony.

"He was an exceptional player and a great person."

The No. 5 had already been taken out of service for Bernard (Boom Boom) Geoffrion, but the Canadiens have three numbers retired for more than one player.

When Lapointe cracked the NHL, he was able to play with boyhood idol Jean Beliveau. Lapointe says his best memory from his playing days is his very first game that 1970-71 season, a year that ended with him scoring 15 goals and earning the first of his six Stanley Cups.

"He had no weaknesses," Savard said Friday. "He was very good offensively, but also defensively."

Lapointe played 777 games with the Canadiens, scoring 166 goals and adding 406 assists for 572 points. In 14 seasons with Montreal, Lapointe was one of the NHL's premier puck-moving defensemen. In the 1974-75 season, he set the team record for goals by a defenseman with 29.

He also played for the St. Louis Blues and Boston Bruins before ending his stellar career in 1984. His final tally: 622 points, including 171 goals, in 894 games.

Lapointe also represented Canada in the riveting Summit Series against the Soviet Union in 1972 and was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1993.

He also was known for his pranks, including cutting laces and underwear, putting shaving cream in skates, and slipping ketchup into shoes.

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Mon Nov 10th, 2014 03:37 am
  PM Quote Reply
113th Post
lobo316



Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Raptorville
Posts: 43530
Status: 
Offline
Philadelphia, PA - Philadelphia Flyers defenseman Luke Schenn will miss approximately two weeks with an upper-body injury, the team said Sunday.

Schenn left Saturday's game against Colorado with what the team said was a left shoulder injury after being boarded by Nathan MacKinnon in the final minute of the first period.

The 25-year-old blueliner has one goal and one assist in 14 games this season.

Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Wed Nov 12th, 2014 08:14 pm
  PM Quote Reply
114th Post
lobo316



Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Raptorville
Posts: 43530
Status: 
Offline
The Montreal Canadiens acquired veteran blueliner Sergei Gonchar from the Dallas Stars in exchange for winger Travis Moen on Tuesday.

Moen, 32, had zero points in 10 games with the Habs this season. The rugged checking forward has another left on his deal next year, which pays him $1.85 million.

"Travis is a proven forward that does all the gritty things needed to win," Stars general manager Jim Nill said in a statement. "He brings leadership and experience to our forward group and will be an important part of our penalty kill."

Moen has 125 points (56 goals, 69 assists) in 690 regular-season games with the Canadiens, San Jose Sharks, Anaheim Ducks and Chicago Blackhawks.

Gonchar had to agree to waive his no-trade clause in order to allow the trade. According to a source, though, he has been looking for a change of scenery since the summer.

He had one assist in three games this season, missing the start of the season with a foot injury. He will be an unrestricted free agent July 1. He's earning $5 million this year although a source told ESPN.com that the Stars retained eight percent of that salary in the trade.

The 40-year-old defenseman has 798 points (219 goals, 579 assists) in 1,256 regular-season games since making his NHL debut in 1994-95.

He has also played for the Washington Capitals, Boston Bruins, Pittsburgh Penguins and Ottawa Senators. Gonchar also represented Russia at four Olympic Games and won a Stanley Cup with the Penguins in 2009.

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Wed Nov 12th, 2014 08:20 pm
  PM Quote Reply
115th Post
lobo316



Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Raptorville
Posts: 43530
Status: 
Offline
ANAHEIM, Calif. -- Right wing Corey Perry and defenseman Francois Beauchemin have missed practice with the Ducks due to a viral gland infection.

Perry and Beauchemin are being kept away from their teammates with their contagious condition, the Ducks said Tuesday. Both veterans are undergoing further medical tests.

Perry has missed the Ducks' last three games after falling seriously ill and requiring intravenous fluids from a local hospital last week. The former NHL MVP is still tied for the league lead with 11 goals heading into Tuesday's games.

Beauchemin missed Sunday's game against Vancouver.

Ducks captain Ryan Getzlaf missed one game last week along with Perry, but returned from his bout with illness.

Anaheim (10-3-3) hosts the defending Stanley Cup champion Los Angeles Kings on Wednesday in the season's first Freeway Faceoff.

Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Wed Nov 12th, 2014 08:22 pm
  PM Quote Reply
116th Post
lobo316



Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Raptorville
Posts: 43530
Status: 
Offline
CHICAGO -- Blackhawks defenseman Johnny Oduya left Tuesday's 3-2 shootout win over the Tampa Bay Lightning in the third period after suffering a lower-body injury.

Oduya was struck in the right leg by a puck off a Lightning shot at 9:09 of the period. Oduya was slow to get up and only got off the ice when the Lightning scored at 9:53. He did not return to the game.

Blackhawks coach Joel Quenneville was unsure of the extent of the injury.

"We'll know more [Wednesday,]" Quenneville said. "We'll see. Hopefully he'll be all right."

Oduya broke his right foot when he took a shot off it last season in Game 7 of the Western Conference finals against the Los Angeles Kings.

Oduya has one goal and one assist and is minus-1 in 16 games this season. He averages 20:16 of ice time.

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Thu Nov 13th, 2014 06:25 pm
  PM Quote Reply
117th Post
lobo316



Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Raptorville
Posts: 43530
Status: 
Offline
Columbus Blue Jackets’ forward Nathan Horton, who hasn’t played since April, could be facing career-ending back surgery.

According to a report in the Columbus Dispatch, Horton is in constant pain due to a degenerative back condition and the only alternative to dealing with the pain is back surgery that would put an end to his career.

“I can’t stand up like a normal person; I can’t bend over,” Horton told the Columbus Dispatch. “I can’t run. I can’t play with my kids. To get in and out of the car, I’m like a 75-year-old man … so slow and stiff. I can’t sleep at night. I try to lay down and my back seizes up and I can’t move, so sleeping is out. I’m like a zombie in the daytime.”

The procedure would be a three- or four-level spinal fusion with a titanium rod according to the report, and would end the 29-year-old’s career.

“I don’t want to have surgery, because of what that means,” Horton told the Columbus Dispatch. “I don’t want to live with this pain, but I don’t want to make that decision.

Horton signed a seven-year, $37.1 million deal with the Blue Jackets ahead of last season but only played in 35 games that year due to injury.

Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Thu Nov 13th, 2014 06:27 pm
  PM Quote Reply
118th Post
lobo316



Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Raptorville
Posts: 43530
Status: 
Offline
ANAHEIM, Calif. - Anaheim Ducks veterans Corey Perry and Francois Beauchemin have been diagnosed with mumps.

Ducks medical director Craig Milhouse announced their conditions on Wednesday night.

Beauchemin has been hospitalized to receive intravenous fluids, but he has improved, Milhouse says. Perry has been cleared of the disease and is free to resume working out Thursday.

Perry missed his fourth straight game, and Beauchemin sat out his second straight when the Ducks hosted the Los Angeles Kings on Wednesday night.

The Ducks don't know how the players contracted the disease, but the entire team will receive new vaccinations as a precaution. Perry and Beauchemin were vaccinated earlier in their lives, but adults' antibody levels decline with time, Milhouse says.

Perry was the NHL leader with 11 goals in 13 games before his illness.

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Thu Nov 13th, 2014 06:27 pm
  PM Quote Reply
119th Post
lobo316



Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Raptorville
Posts: 43530
Status: 
Offline
According to an article in the New York Post, the NHL has chosen William Foley, a billionaire businessman, and the Maloof family, former owners of the Sacramento Kings, to be the potential owners of a Las Vegas expansion team.

The NHL has made no formal commitments to expansion.

Bill Daly, NHL Deputy Commissioner, said Monday that he had met with a Las Vegas ownership group and liked the idea of expanding to the Nevada city. He did not give specifics as to whom he spoke to.

According to the Post's sources, the franchise fee would cost $400 million which would be significantly higher than the fee for both the Minnesota Wild and Columbus Blue Jackets back when the league last expanded in 2000.

Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Thu Nov 13th, 2014 11:39 pm
  PM Quote Reply
120th Post
CanadianHorseman



Joined: Fri Nov 2nd, 2007
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia Canada
Posts: 14026
Status: 
Offline
lobo316 wrote: Columbus Blue Jackets’ forward Nathan Horton, who hasn’t played since April, could be facing career-ending back surgery.

Looks like the end is near for the spiritual leader of the 2011 Stanley Cup Champions.



from columbusdispatch.com:

Blue Jackets forward Nathan Horton is stuck in a living hell and facing a torturous decision.

Horton, who hasn’t played since April, is in near constant pain — sometimes agony — because of a degenerative back injury that has derailed his NHL career.

“I can’t stand up like a normal person; I can’t bend over,” Horton said in his first public comments about his condition. “I can’t run. I can’t play with my kids. To get in and out of the car, I’m like a 75-year-old man … so slow and stiff. I can’t sleep at night. I try to lay down and my back seizes up and I can’t move, so sleeping is out. I’m like a zombie in the daytime.”

But the alternative to dealing with such misery is just as awful. Horton could have surgery to relieve the pain, but the procedure — likely a three- or four-level spinal fusion  with a titanium rod — would mean the end of his NHL career at only 29 years old.

“I don’t want to have surgery, because of what that means,” Horton said, his voice breaking behind a smile. “I don’t want to live with this pain, but I don’t want to make that decision. It’s hard for me to say that, at 29 years old, I’m done. I mean, really? Done at 29?”


Out of nowhere

Horton said he never had a history of back problems, nothing beyond what is considered normal in a sport where two-handed crosschecks and slamming into glass walls is routine. Before he signed a seven-year, $37.1million contract with the Blue Jackets in July 2013, Horton passed a routine physical with the exception of his injured shoulder.

The Boston Bruins, his former club, didn’t suspect anything, either. With full access to Horton’s medical history, the Bruins offered him a long-term deal that he rejected to sign with the Blue Jackets. But last fall, while he was rehabilitating his shoulder after surgery, Horton started noticing stiffness and discomfort in his back.

“It just hit me,” Horton said. “There I was working on my shoulder, while my back started getting worse and worse.”

Horton thought he could play through it, that maybe his back would loosen up when he started to play regularly. But after returning in January, his back only got worse.

“I couldn’t get my socks on,” Horton said. “I could barely tie my skates. But I’ve played through stuff my whole career. I kept going.”

By April, Horton’s back was hurting so bad that his skating stride changed to compensate. That led to a groin injury that required surgery and ended his season after only 36 games.

“After I rehabbed the groin, my back flared again, and it has not gone away,” Horton said. “I went back to Florida in the spring (May) to rehab it, and I went for an easy jog — just 25 minutes — to get back into it. The next couple of days, I couldn’t move. And here we are. I couldn’t jog right now if I wanted to.”

Horton flew with the Blue Jackets to the season-opening game at Buffalo, barely a 45-minute flight.

“I couldn’t move for two days,” he said.


The many remedies

Stem cells. Epidurals. Acupuncture. Chiropractors. Massage therapy. So many MRIs.

“I’ve tried everything,” Horton said. “I’ve seen so many doctors. So many people think they can fix me and they’re so optimistic, and then I get optimistic, but then … nothing changes. It’s so frustrating. I’ve heard from so many people with back issues, and it’s a different thing, the pain. It controls everything.”

The Blue Jackets and Horton have opted to wait and hope that — somehow, someway — his back pain fades over time. But nobody in the organization seems optimistic. Horton sighed and shook his head when asked how realistic the wait-and-see approach is.

“At some point soon, we’ve got to make the call,” he said, referring to surgery.

There are five vertebrae in the lumbar region. In Horton’s case, he said, he would need to have at least three, maybe four, fused with a titanium rod.The titanium provides stability and support and a relatively pain-free existence.

 “For an elite-level athlete, it can severely restrict mobility, flexibility and shock absorption,” said Dr. Safdar Khan, chief of the division of spine surgery at Ohio State’s Wexner Medical Center.“We get our regular patients back to a point where they can swim and be active and live normal lives. But playing a competitive sport — especially one like hockey with the body checks and the hitting — that is not something that’s going to happen.”

Horton might join a list of prominent NHL players whose careers were cut short because of back injuries. Mike Bossy, considered one of the NHL’s all-time greats, retired in 1987 at only 30 years old. He averaged 113 points per season during a 10-year career.

More recently, Chicago Blackhawks forward Eric Daze retired at 31 in 2006, and Edmonton Oilers forward Craig Simpson retired in 1995 at age 28. 

Pittsburgh Penguins great Mario Lemieux couldn’t tie his own skates because of back problems at the end of his career.

“I wouldn’t wish this on anyone,” Horton said.

Once or twice a week, Horton stops by Nationwide Arena. But he has no locker stall in the dressing room, no uniform hanging with his name on it, no new sticks being delivered or skates being sharpened.

“I’m a ghost,” he said with a laugh. “But I’m not giving up. I still feel young other than my back. As long as I can hold off the surgery, I feel like there’s a chance. A chance for something. A miracle. Something.”



____________________
Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

Current time is 05:29 pm Page:  First Page Previous Page  ...  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  ...  Next Page Last Page    
WowBB Forums > Sports And Wrestling > Sports Talk > NHL 2014-15 Season Thread Top




UltraBB 1.172 Copyright © 2007-2013 Data 1 Systems