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 Posted: Tue Nov 7th, 2017 09:45 pm
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LAF



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Had a bad feeling it was him when I saw that his Twitter was all about flying planes.

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 Posted: Tue Nov 7th, 2017 09:49 pm
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lobo316



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the press conference




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 Posted: Tue Nov 7th, 2017 10:15 pm
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Ultimark



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Yea, the phillies put out a statement saying they feel numb. That is exactly how I feel with this news. I remember in 12 and 13 as the innings wore him down and he had to be shut down, he said to a reporter, "I hope the fans don't hate me now". He really was a genuine guy. Not rah, rah and all that. Just a real guy.

RIP.

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 Posted: Tue Nov 7th, 2017 11:11 pm
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freebirdsforever2001



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Ultimark wrote: Yea, the phillies put out a statement saying they feel numb. That is exactly how I feel with this news. I remember in 12 and 13 as the innings wore him down and he had to be shut down, he said to a reporter, "I hope the fans don't hate me now". He really was a genuine guy. Not rah, rah and all that. Just a real guy.

RIP.

Also donated a Million Dollars each year to Philabundance. Very good man.



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 Posted: Wed Nov 8th, 2017 02:03 am
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KGB

 

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When the Phillies signed (traded for) him in the winter after the 2009 season, it really brought home for me just how much times had changed. He was, bar none, the one player I wanted the Phils to get and they actually had the pedigree and farm system to make it happen. I ordered a t-shirt with his name and number that very week. And then he only went out and exceeded expectations. A perfect game, a Cy Young, and a post-season no hitter all in his first season.

The next summer, I went to Toronto to see his return against the Jays. When he came out to start the bottom of the first the fans gave him a long and loud ovation but he continued warming up as if nothing was happening, never acknowledging the cheers. After the game he explained that as a visiting player he didn't think it was right to show up the home team by calling attention to himself. I doubt any of the Blue Jays would have taken offense had he tipped his cap, but that was how principled he was. When you see all the "look at me!!" crap that goes on in sports today, Halladay was the kind of guy who reminded you that maybe you shouldn't write off the game yet.

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 Posted: Wed Nov 8th, 2017 01:56 pm
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Ultimark



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KGB wrote: When the Phillies signed (traded for) him in the winter after the 2009 season, it really brought home for me just how much times had changed. He was, bar none, the one player I wanted the Phils to get and they actually had the pedigree and farm system to make it happen. I ordered a t-shirt with his name and number that very week. And then he only went out and exceeded expectations. A perfect game, a Cy Young, and a post-season no hitter all in his first season.

The next summer, I went to Toronto to see his return against the Jays. When he came out to start the bottom of the first the fans gave him a long and loud ovation but he continued warming up as if nothing was happening, never acknowledging the cheers. After the game he explained that as a visiting player he didn't think it was right to show up the home team by calling attention to himself. I doubt any of the Blue Jays would have taken offense had he tipped his cap, but that was how principled he was. When you see all the "look at me!!" crap that goes on in sports today, Halladay was the kind of guy who reminded you that maybe you shouldn't write off the game yet.
This

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 Posted: Wed Nov 8th, 2017 02:18 pm
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lobo316



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Halladay was very reserved, tho not an asshole like Dave Steib. His wife was just the opposite, bubbly personality & very outgoing & he meekly followed her lead.They were perfect for each other.
When the Jays traded him, he took out a full page ad in the Toronto Sun to say goodbye to the fans.




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 Posted: Wed Nov 8th, 2017 04:28 pm
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Angelic Assassin



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Justin Bieber is still alive, correct? What a fucked up world.

RIP Doc.



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Hey Rossi! Guessing that based on that picture of you floating around your wife must play the man in the relationship. Is that why you're such a condescending asshole on here? No balls to be anything at home? Rossi = The Mouth That Bored!
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 Posted: Wed Nov 8th, 2017 05:50 pm
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Spatulapup

 

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I saw Roy pitch in person quite a few times. one of the best ever. You always knew it would be a short game and that it was always possible you would see him get a no hitter. met him once too. Class guy. I will never understand the people that like to fly in those small planes. You never know what can happen. RIP Roy.

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 Posted: Wed Nov 8th, 2017 08:24 pm
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Spatulapup

 

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there is a video on TMZ of Roy flying just before he crashed. witnesses say he was showboating and flying dangerous just before he crashed.

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 Posted: Wed Nov 8th, 2017 08:27 pm
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Ultimark



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Athletes like him are so competitive. Probably that attribute that led him to taking more risk than was advisable.

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 Posted: Thu Nov 9th, 2017 04:15 pm
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lobo316



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The Maple Leafs had a moment's silence for Halladay & played a tribute video before their game with the Wild last night.He wasn't Canadian, a Leaf, or hockey player, yet few athletes were so beloved in this town as Halladay.






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 Posted: Thu Nov 9th, 2017 04:27 pm
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KGB

 

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I just saw the amateur video shot of Halladay's flight moments before crashing.  It doesn't look like Roy was exercising the best judgment. 

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 Posted: Tue Nov 14th, 2017 02:19 pm
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lobo316



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Roy Halladay stood at the front of a conference room in Clearwater, Fla. He was there, on the second floor of the Phillies’ Carpenter Complex, to lead a presentation for a group of minor league players. He was there — roughly 24 hours before his deathin a plane crash last Tuesday — to teach.
The Phillies hired Halladay in March as a mental skills coach for the minor-leaguers who played and trained in Florida. He worked five days a week and had his own office, which included a massage chair. Baseball’s mental side became Halladay’s obsession after he resurrected his career in the early 2000s under the guidance of a sports psychologist named Harvey Dorfman. And now Halladay had the chance to spread his passion.
Halladay met throughout the season with players both individually and in group sessions such as this. He did not teach them his two-seam fastball, but instead how to tackle the mental challenges that lie ahead.
“I was pretty star-struck at first,” said Luke Leftwich, a 23-year-old right-handed pitcher who finished the season with high-A Clearwater. “But he was just so easy to talk to. He’s one of thegreatest pitchers ever, and he was just such a normal guy. It was really easy to want to talk to him.”
The Phillies began courting Halladay four years ago, when he retired from playing. Ruben Amaro Jr., who had tried tirelessly to acquire Halladay before getting him in December 2009, hoped the pitcher would stay with the Phillies as a coach. Halladay, wanting to spend time with his wife and two sons, deferred.
The pursuit continued as Scott Proefrock, an assistant general manager to both Amaro and Matt Klentak, kept in touch. A deal seemed close before the 2016 season, but Halladay, who coached his son’s youth baseball teams, backed out. He finally joined the Phillies before last season, first as a spring training instructor and then as a mentee to Geoff Miller, who was hired four months earlier as the team’s first mental-skills coach.
“I’ve always been hesitant to entertain a former player without any formal education doing this kind of work,” Miller said.
“Sitting down with Roy, he really changed my mind about it. For a few reasons. One is the 13 years he spent with Harvey Dorfman. He knew Harvey’s work forward and backward. I don’t think many former players were that devoted to it. And the other piece is that he was so humble. He was very quick to recognize where his limits were in the work he was doing and to ask for help and seek additional knowledge. He was just so interested in helping others.”


Halladay’s office sat just 150 metres from the clubhouse of the Clearwater Threshers, the Phillies affiliate in the Florida State League. He often walked through the clubhouse and sat at the lunch table in the middle of the room.
“I don’t know if he was just bored over there or just trying to make it seem like he was pretty approachable by being available,” Leftwich said. “Like ‘Here I am. I’m sitting at the table in your locker room. I am this available right now.’”
Halladay posted two sheets on the clubhouse bulletin board. One was to reserve his office massage chair. The other was to schedule one-on-one meetings.
Halladay, a baseball great, had office hours. It was quite the opportunity.
“I met with him four or five times,” said Jeff Singer, a left-hander from South Jersey who grew up a rabid Phillies fan. “We would just talk about life. You could talk to him about anything, which was awesome. When you walked into that office, you didn’t feel like you were going to meet Roy Halladay. It just felt like anyone else.”
Halladay ended each session by giving the player a set of two books by Dorfman, in whom he had immersed himself when Toronto demoted him in 2001 to single A after a historically rough beginning to his major league career. Halladay gave each player a notebook and instructed each to jot down notes throughout the season, which they would then go over together during future sessions.
Singer remembered watching Halladay’s perfect game and no-hitter while dictating each play over the phone to his brother, who was away at college and could not watch.
Then he sat in Halladay’s office and told him how he had struggled to record the third out of an inning. Singer could retire two batters with ease, but then trouble often brewed. Halladay listened and gave Singer an exercise to clear his mind that he had used during his own career.
“It was a block of 100 numbers and there’s one number in each block. You had to go from 99 to one. Look for 99, cross it out. Look for 98, cross it out. 97, cross it out. All the way to one,” Singer said.
“He had me do that before the game, and it really cleared my mind and helped me get locked in. He told me his best score was 2 minutes and 35 seconds. He said he was awful his first time so it would be OK if I finished in six or seven minutes. My first time was 14 minutes, 20 seconds. He just started laughing.”
Leftwich scheduled monthly meetings with Halladay and found that they had similar upbringings. Halladay told the young pitcher about the external pressure he once felt to perform well to please his father.
“And a big change for him was when he gave himself an internal look,” Leftwich said. “‘Why am I doing this? I’m doing this because I love it. I’m not doing this just for them. I want to do this because I love it and this is what I want to do with my life.’ We talked a lot about getting rid of external pressures and concentrating on what I can do internally to make myself better.”
Halladay’s work continued after the season. He made a presentation last month during the instructional league about the challenges he overcame to get back to the majors after his demotion. He told the players to look around the room. Everyone, Halladay said, is talented, but it is your mental preparation that will set you apart.
“You could see that he was talking from the heart,” said Steve Noworyta, the team’s assistant director of player development.
Last Monday’s lecture, the final lesson Halladay would give, was for a group of players from the Phillies’ strength and conditioning camp. He geared his speech toward working out. He talked of how important it is to give a full effort in the gym when no one is watching. He told them how to battle the mental grind of spring training when the days become monotonous and you just want the season to begin.
“He was just giving us a piece of what helped him,” said Connor Brogdon, a 22-year-old right-hander drafted last June. “He said when he was coming up that there was always an argument of what came first: success or confidence? He said he found out it was neither. It was preparation that came first. I’ll never forget that.”
Brogdon was in Spanish class last Tuesday — the Phillies offer language courses to their minor-leaguers at the Carpenter Complex — when he noticed a teammate on his phone.
Brogdon gave him a look, but the player said he was monitoring something serious on Twitter. Another teacher then entered the room and broke the news: Roy Halladay, who just a day earlier had taught in the same building, died after crashing his plane into the Gulf of Mexico.
Class ended immediately.
“It was instant silence,” Brogdon said. “We looked around at each other and were just at a loss for words. We all just packed up our things and left. We didn’t even say a word.”
Halladay’s time in this role was short. But his impact was large. The Phillies hoped that he would work with them for years. Maybe he would become their major league pitching coach. Or perhaps he would stay in his Clearwater office with that massage chair. Halladay had so much more to give.
“That’s what (stinks) the most. He was such a good person, and the whole place looked up to him,” Leftwich said. “It was so great to have him around. It will definitely be tough to go back for spring training and him not being there. We’re a strong group, and I know we’re definitely going to play in his honour.”




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