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 Posted: Tue Feb 19th, 2019 07:53 am
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Papa Voo



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Alfredo Escalara





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 Posted: Tue Feb 19th, 2019 07:55 am
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Papa Voo



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Johnny “Bump City” Bumphus 


Dubbed "Bump City", Bumphus began his professional career as a hot prospect, winning his first 22 fights, including the Vacant WBA Light Welterweight Title with a decision win over Lorenzo Luis Garcia in 1984. Bumphus lost the belt to Gene Hatcher in June 1984 in Buffalo, New York. Hatcher scored an 11th-round technical knockout that had Hatcher knocking Bumphus down, then slipping and falling on a follow-up attempt, then throwing Bumphus down to the mat when both fighters clinched. A post-fight melee in the ring then ensued, as Hatcher was celebrating in triumph while the now-deposed champion was slugging away in frustration. The fight was named as Ring magazine's Upset of the Year for 1984. In 1987, Bumphus took on Lloyd Honeghann for the WBC and IBF Welterweight Title, but lost with 2nd round technical knock out. He retired after the loss, with a record of 29-2-0.Those in Tacoma's Hilltop area knew of the lure drugs had for Bumphus. Towards the end of his boxing career he developed an addiction to cocaine, which he briefly kicked. When he returned to Tacoma, through a series of bad friends and choices, he resumed taking drugs in 1989, becoming addicted to crack cocaine. In 1995, he spent a year in rehab, and then left Tacoma to work as a trainer for his former manager Lou Duva in West Palm Beach, Florida.

As a trainer, he has worked with Kassim Ouma and Emmett Linton.

Bumphus qualified at 139 pounds and was a member of the 1980 U.S. Olympic boxing team that died in the crash of LOT Polish Airlines Flight 007 in WarsawPoland, on 14 March 1980 en route to the USA vs. Poland Box-off as part of "USA vs. the World" event. Bumphus was not with the team. Among the USA Boxing teammates who were killed in the crash were Lemuel Steeples from St. Louis, Calvin Anderson from Connecticut, Paul Palomino - the brother of Carlos Palimino, George Pimental and the Olympic coach, Sarge Johnson.  Members of the team who were also not aboard included  Bobby Czyz, Akex Ramos and James Shuler.

Bumphus earned his place on the team with a win over Ronnie Shields. Bumphus did not compete in the Olympics, due to the  1980 Summer Olympic boycott. In 2007, he received one of 461 Congressional Gold Medals created especially for the spurned athletes.



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 Posted: Tue Feb 19th, 2019 02:12 pm
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I remember Bumphus being featured on TV Boxing prominently back then. "Bump City" was a kick ass nickname for any era.



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 Posted: Tue Feb 19th, 2019 05:30 pm
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Leonard vs. Duran (Part 1)


On June 20, 1980, Roberto Duran won the WBC welterweight title by defeating Sugar Ray Leonard by unanimous decision in 15 hard-fought rounds. The fight took place at the Olympic Stadium in Montreal. 1. Duran entered the bout 71-1 after a long career at the lightweight division.

Known as “The Brawl in Montreal,” the fight garnered much hype. This was Leonard’s first fight back in Montreal since he won his Olympic gold medal in 1976. His flashy personality and marketability had already made him a household name. Leonard won his WBC title belt after knocking Wilfred Benitez out in November 1979, and he defended it against Dave Green with a fourth-round KO in March 1980.


Duran, nicknamed “Hands of Stone,” developed a reputation as a dynamic, knockout puncher at the lightweight division. He unified the WBA and WBC titles at the lightweight in 1978 after knocking out WBC champ Esteban De Jesús. Duran vacated the titles the next year to move up to welterweight.


During the pre-fight press conference, Duran repeatedly insulted Leonard to get under his skin. This prompted Leonard to tell the media he would “kill” Duran during their fight.

The fight

Angelo Dundee, Leonard’s trainer, advised his fighter to box smart against Duran. Leonard, known for his quick movements and boxing prowess, elected to fight toe-to-toe with Duran, but that favored the Panamanian bruiser. In the early rounds of the fight, Duran repeatedly cornered Leonard and forced him into the ropes. Duran punished Leonard with body shots and appeared to be in control through the first half of the bout.
The tide slowly turned for Leonard around the 10th round, as he began to fight closer to his natural style and fatigue set in for Duran. The next round, however, Leonard again retreated to the corners and spent more than half the round on the ropes. The last three rounds were a slugfest in which both fighters landed hard shots, but neither fighter gave in. The post-fight decision left confusion because of a judge’s scoring error, but Duran won by unanimous decision 145-144, 148-147, 146-144.

The numbers
Duran was the aggressor early and often during the fight. He consistently cornered Leonard and kept him on the ropes, landing power shots while his opponent was stagnant. Leonard averaged five fewer jabs (three) per round in this fight than in his 16 other fights tracked by CompuBox.

Leonard made adjustments later in the fight, but Duran had built a large lead early. At one point in the third round, Leonard was on the ropes for 30 seconds and took 17 punches.

The aftermath


The loss was the first of Leonard’s career and a defining moment. Leonard gained some respect for his will to fight in Duran’s style, but he also lost because he fought to the strength of his opponent. On the flip side, it was arguably the biggest win of Duran’s storied career. The fight was one of the many battles between the top fighters of the era (Duran, Leonard, Hearns, Hagler). Duran and Leonard would go on to fight two more times, once in November 1980 and again in December 1989.


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 Posted: Tue Feb 19th, 2019 05:42 pm
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Leonard vs. Duran (Part 2) 


Sugar Ray Leonard vs Roberto Duran II, also known as the No Más Fight, is one of the most famous fights in boxing history. It took place on November 25, 1980 at the Louisiana Super Dome in New Orleans, United States and was the second of three bouts between the pair. It gained its famous name from the moment at the end of the eighth round when Durán turned away from Leonard towards the referee and quit by apparently saying, "No más" (Spanish for "No more").

Their first fight took place on June 20, 1980 in Montreal. Leonard was defending the wBC Welterweight Championship for the second time. Durán was the WBC #1 welterweight contender.

Leonard abandoned his usual slick boxing style and stood flat-footed with Durán. Leonard, angry with Durán over his numerous insults, wanted to beat Durán at his own game. The tactic resulted in a great fight but a losing effort for Leonard. Durán won by unanimous decision. The scores were 148–147, 145–144, and 146–144.


The rematch took place November 25, 1980 at the Superdome in New Orleans. Leonard used his superior speed and movement to outbox and befuddle Durán. "The whole fight, I was moving, I was moving," Leonard said. "And Voom! I snapped his head back with a jab. Voom! I snapped it back again. He tried to get me against the ropes, I'd pivot, spin off and Pow! Come under with a punch."

In Round 7, Leonard started to taunt Durán. Leonard's most memorable punch came late in the round. Winding up his right hand, as if to throw a bolo punch, Leonard snapped out a left jab and caught Durán flush in the face.

In the closing seconds of the eighth round, Durán turned his back to Leonard and quit, waving his glove and apparently saying to referee Octavio Meyran, "No más" ("No more" in Spanish). Leonard was the winner by a technical knockout at 2:44 of Round 8, regaining the WBC Welterweight Championship. Leonard led by a small margin of 68–66, 68–66, and 67–66 on the judges scorecards at the time of the TKO.

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 Posted: Tue Feb 19th, 2019 08:41 pm
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Papa Voo wrote: LOL

I also was not a Ray Leonard fan. I was rooting for Benitez in their bout.

Leonard’s comeback was disgusting. There was almost nothing that could stop them from creating their “boxing marketing” champion.
I wasn't either.  I can remember desperately rooting for Tommy Hearns and Duran.  
The 80's was definitely the last great decade for boxing imo. I don't even know who the heavyweight champ(s) is anymore.  I also don't care.  In the 80's there were numerous notable fighters at almost every weight class.  I boxed in the Army so I would watch them all with interest, especially the Welterweights.  

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 Posted: Tue Feb 19th, 2019 08:56 pm
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Boxing in the 80s was all about the middleweights/welterweights with all of the fighters already mentioned (Sugar Ray Leonard, Thomas "Hitman" Hearns, Roberto Duran, "Marvelous" Marvin Hagler, etc). Here in Maryland, Sugar Ray Leonard (from Palmer Park, MD) fights were all over the news stations.
In the 90s, I think the focus shifted to the heavyweights as Mike Tyson, Evander Holyfield, George Foreman, Lennox Lewis, Riddick Bowe, and other fighters main evented PPVs. These fighters all seemed to have controversial fights / close decisions which resulted in multiple rematches and led me to believe that boxing was rigged. My faith in boxing being a fair sport has never been restored - especially after the Mayweather vs. McGregor spectacle.

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 Posted: Tue Feb 19th, 2019 10:12 pm
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Featherweight Champion Salvador Sanchez 

Salvador Sanchez began boxing at age 16. 

Sanchez’s only defeat came at a young age to seasoned veteran Antonio Becerra who was Mexican bantamweight champion at the time. Sanchez kept fighting and moved up to the featherweight division and beat the likes of Felix Trinidad Sr.  Sanchez wirked his way to a title shot against featherweight workd champion Danny “Little Red” Lopez.  The 21-year old Sanchez took on the tough champion and knocked out Lopez in 13 rounds on February 2, 1980. 



February 2, 1980. Sánchez defended his title for the first time with a 15-round unanimous decision against Ruben Castillo (47–1). Thinking it was just a case of 'beginner’s luck' (as it was Sánchez's first world title fight ever), Lopez looked for a rematch and this he got, in Las Vegas. This time Sánchez defeated Lopez by 14th-round TKO. In his next fight, he defeated Patrick Ford (15–0).


On December 13, 1980, Sánchez defeated future champion Juan LaPorte by unanimous decision. Sánchez then defended his title against Roberto Castanon (43–1–0) and scored a win over Nicky Perez (50–3–0). Then undefeated World Jr Featherweight champion Wilfred Gomez (32–0–1) went up in weight and challenged Sánchez. Sánchez retained the crown by a knockout in round eight on August 21, 1981, in Las Vegas, and Gómez had to return to the Jr. Featherweight division.

With that victory, Salvador was an unknown to the casual boxing fan no more. He became a household name all over the United States that night.

In his next fight, he defeated Olympic medalist Pat Cowdellby split decision. His defense vs unheralded Jorge "Rocky" Garcia was the first fight featuring two featherweights ever to be televised by HBO. He beat Garcia punch after punch, but the challenger gave honor to his nickname, an unknown fighter who lasts the distance with the world champion.
On July 21, 1982, Sánchez faced future champion Azumah Nelson at Madison Square Garden. Nelson, a late substitute for mandatory challenger Mario Miranda, was unknown at the time however, and was expected to only go a few rounds with the champ. It was an intense battle, with Sánchez managing to drop his young charge in the 7th round. After that they engaged in violent exchange after violent exchange. In the 15th, Sánchez broke out finally, connecting with a serious combination that dropped the challenger almost outside the ring. Referee Tony Perez had to stop the fight seconds later. Azumah Nelson went on to have a glittering career and was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 2004.

Sánchez's dominance as featherweight champion was such that he held title defense victories over the next three fighters (LaPorte, Gomez, and Nelson) who won the WBC title after his death. He went 4-0, all by knockout, against fellow members of the International Boxing Hall of Fame (Danny Lopez twice-KO 13, KO 14-Wilfredo Gomez-KO 8-and Azumah Nelson-KO 15)

Death

As he was training for a rematch with Laporte set for September, he crashed on the early morning of August 12, 1982, while driving his Porsche 928 sports car along the federal highway from Santiago de Queretaro to San Luis Potosi, dying instantly.   At the time of his death, there were talks about a bout with Miranda, a rematch with Gómez or a challenge of world lightweight champion Alexis Arguello.  The latter was already off the table. There had been negotiations between the Sánchez and Argüello camps but they broke off when Argüello chose to campaign as a junior welterweight. Salvador Sánchez finished his career 44-1-1. Sánchez was posthumously inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1991.


***I enjoy going back and watching some of Sanchez’s matches on youtube.  Fast with power. 

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 Posted: Tue Feb 19th, 2019 11:02 pm
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Muhammad Ali vs Larry Holmes (WBC champion) 


October 2, 1980

On July 17, 1980, Ali and Holmes signed to fight on October 2 at Caesers Palace in Las Vegas. Promoter Don King said Ali would be paid $8 million and Holmes $6 million. Caesars Palace constructed a temporary 24,790-seat outdoor arena for the fight. The live gate was $6 million, a record for that time.


Due to concerns for Ali's health, the Nevada State Athletic Commission had the former champion examined at Minnesota's Mayo Clinic as a prerequisite to being granted a boxing license. Ali checked into the clinic on July 23, 1980. His neurological exam was conducted by Dr. Frank Howard, whose report contained the following information: Ali showed a slight degree of missing when he tried to touch his finger to his nose, he had difficulty in coordinating the muscles used in speaking, and he did not hop on one foot with expected agility. However, Dr. Howard determined that there were no specific findings to prohibit Ali from fighting. The Mayo Clinic report was forwarded to the Nevada State Athletic Committee, but it was not made public at that time. Based on the report, Ali was granted a boxing license in Nevada.


Ali weighed in at 217½ pounds, his lightest weight since he defeated George Foreman on October 30, 1974.

There were no knockdowns, but Holmes dominated the fight and was given every round by all three judges. Holmes won through a technical knockout after Ali's trainer Angelo Dundee stopped the fight after the tenth round. 

According to Ferdie Pacheco, Ali's former ring doctor, "All the people involved in this fight should've been arrested. This fight was an abomination, a crime."  Pacheco had earlier quit Ali's camp, in 1977, after Ali's fight with Earnie Shavers. Pacheco claims he had sent Ali's medical results to Angelo Dundee, Jabir Herbert Muhammad, Ali, and Veronica Porche Ali noting that "This is what's happening to you. If you want to continue, you have no shot at a normal life." Pacheco says he never received any response to his warning.  In 2012, Ali met Pacheco for the last time and told him "you was right", something he had said to Pacheco several times before. According to Pacheco after Ali's death in 2016:

The unnecessary punches he took wouldn't have stopped the Parkinson's. But I think it would not have compounded it as it has. Who knows, Ali may not have passed away now if he'd stopped when I asked. He may not have been trapped in a shell like he was for so many years.

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 Posted: Tue Feb 19th, 2019 11:14 pm
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Out of all my MSG memories, one of the biggest ones was having good seats to the Hagler vs. Hamsho title defense. Undisputed champion Hagler was at his peak. Hamsho was a legit top ten contender. The fight itself wasn't too competitive as Hagler stopped Mustafa in the 5th of 6th round.There really was something uniquely exciting in the air with fight night at the Garden.

John "The Beast" Mugabi was an incredibly exciting fighter and one of my favorites. He fought a very game fight against Hagler even though he was stopped.

Two Bronx boys were also at the top of my list for favorite fighters in Iran Barkley and Davey Moore. Unfortunately for Barkley he hung around WAY too long. I was almost in tears when Duran thumbed Davey in the eye at their MSG bout and took a lopsided victory against the Bronx kid. Davey was fighting in his own backyard but the Garden crowd was completely behind Duran. Davey was killed way too young in an automobile accident near his home.

A great heavyweight of the time was Michael Dokes. Built like a tank and seemed unbeatable with insane knockout power. Cocaine did him in professionaly.



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 Posted: Tue Feb 19th, 2019 11:19 pm
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The Beast was probably my favorite boxer of the 1980’s.  

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 Posted: Tue Feb 19th, 2019 11:25 pm
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John “The Beast” Mugabi 



Representing Uganda, Mugabi was the Silver medalist at the 1980 Olympic Games in Moscow, boxing in the Welterweight class. Mugabi lost to Andres Aldama of Cuba in the final.

John Mugabi started as a professional on December 5, 1980, by knocking out Oemer Karadenis in round one in Cologne. Soon after that win, Mugabi moved to London where he became acquainted with boxing promoter Mickey Duff, an expert in boxer marketing who landed Mugabi various fights in England and built his reputation there. Mugabi won eight fights in Europe. Searching for more formidable foes, John moved to Florida where he became a favourite of American TV networks with his sensational knockouts of contenders such as Curtis Ramsey, Gary Guiden, former world champion Eddue Gazo, Curtis Parker, Frank The Animal Fletcher, Nino Gonzalez and Earl Hargrove through a display of tenacity and ferociousness.'The Beast’ as he would become known (for his ferocious attacks and untamable style—bashing his prey with overhand rights and wild left hooks) was able to fluctuate his weight between middleweight and junior middleweight. Some people lose effectiveness by changing weight classes, but not Mugabi. He was able to knock out every opponent he faced to that point of his career.

Mugabi’s first victory of note came on May 2, 1982, when he took on veteran Curtis Ramsey. It was Mugabi’s 11th bout and he took care of the American in two rounds in Atlantic City, New Jersey. 1983 was a busy calendar year for the Beast. In that year he took on Gary Guiden, who had just come off of a Championship fight against Davey Moore; Mugabi stopped him in three. Many started speculating about Mugabi’s role in the future of the Junior Middleweight and Middleweight divisions. The fact Mugabi easily made the weight at both divisions made him more intriguing than most prospects. Nicaraguan, Eddie Gazo, a former WBA Junior Middleweight Champion provided Mugabi with his first real test. Gazo went rounds with Mugabi, but ‘The Beast’ ended things the way he always did. Mugabi was simply stronger and faster tactically overwhelming the busier Gazo. In the same year, Mugabi took on Curtis Parker a former Pennsylvania Golden Gloves amateur champion )The ‘meeting’ with Curtis Parker was on national television. Parker was an established fighter, but Mugabi’s destruction of Parker was savage. It was the first time that Parker had lost a bout by knockout.


In February 1984 Mugabi’s ability to take adversity was tested by James ‘Hard Rock’ Green. Mugabi slowly took control of the fight until it was stopped in the 10th round, with Mugabi declared the winner by technical knockout. The bout between ‘The Beast’ and Frank ‘The Animal’ Fletcher marked a quiet maturity that marked Mugabi’s transformation from being what had been dubbed a ‘banger’ with raw power to a refined tactical boxer. The Beast hurt his prey, gently testing with his jabs and then in the 4th round a couple of roundhouse punches and a haymaker travelling all the way from his waist caught Fletcher asleep—the fight ended with Fletcher’s body between the ropes.


On his way to becoming the number one contender for the middleweight title of each of the three major sanctioning bodies (WBA, WBC, and IBF),   Mugabi ran roughshod over the division and finished each of his opponents inside the distance. Mugabi's ferocity was captured by Phil Berger. Writing in the New York Times in 1986, Berger, commenting on Mugabi’s preparation for the Hagler fight noted the intensity of preparation that left his sparring partners in a 'woebegone condition' and further that some did not last long enough to draw their second paycheck and left Mugabi’s training camp ‘looking like extras from 'Night of the Living Dead'.


Because of his ability to fight both at junior middleweight and middleweight, fans began to talk about the possibility of him challenging either world light middleweight champion Hearns or world middleweight champion Hagler. Despite Mugabi being a mandatory contender for some time, a Hearns - Mugabi title match never materialised, as Hearns elected to move to Middleweight to challenge Marvelous Marvin Hagler. Considering his streak and Hagler's tough battle with Hearns on April 15, 1985, some felt Mugabi had a shot at doing what eleven men before him could not: wresting Hagler's undisputed world middleweight title from him. On March 10, 1986, Marvin ‘Marvelous’ Hagler rose to a very stiff challenge. A young, undefeated powerhouse was destroying every opponent in his path. John ‘The Beast’ Mugabi had won all of his contests by knockout—many spectacular; many in the first few rounds of the fight. He possessed incredible knockout power and provided the boxing world with an epic encounter.


The fight was the first televised by Showtime. Mugabi landed his share of blows to Hagler's head during the early rounds. The turning point came in the sixth round when Hagler landed many heavy blows and staggered Mugabi. Mugabi fought back gamely but his early knockout wins left him ill-prepared for a long, tough fight. In the end, it was Hagler who came out the victor, with a knockout in the eleventh round. Many boxing fans consider this to have been the toughest contest of Hagler's career.  Sugar Ray Leonard’s decision to come out of retirement and challenge Hagler for the Middleweight Championship was heavily influenced by Hagler's performance in the Mugabi fight.


After his first loss, Mugabi retired to Uganda and ballooned in weight to 190  lbs. In September 1986 he contacted Mickey Duff, stating that he was ready to fight again. Mugabi went down in weight and was given an opportunity by the WBC to win their world light middleweight title, vacated by Hearns. Once again many fans favoured him, this time against Duane Thomas, on December 5 of '86. However, Mugabi suffered a broken eye socket, the consequence of a punch in round three and the fight had to be stopped. Mugabi underwent optical surgery the next day to repair his injury.


Discouraged by two consecutive losses, Mugabi gained weight and did not fight for nearly fourteen months. In January 1988, he came back to fight Bryan Grant on the undercard of Mike Tyson's title defence against Larry Holmes. Mugabi won by quick knockout and set off on another knockout winning streak. He became number one contender for the WBC 154  lb title in August 1988 but could not land a fight with then-champion Donald Curry. After Curry lost his title in an upset in early 1989, Mugabi was given another opportunity to become world champion by the WBC. On July 8 of that year, Mugabi finally made his dream come true, knocking out Curry's successor Rene Jacquot in round one in Grenoble to become the WBC light middleweight champion.After two first-round knockout wins against Ricky Stackhouse and Carlos Antunes, Mugabi, who by this time was having difficulty making the weight limit of 154  lbs, put his title on the line against Terry Norris. When Norris downed the champion for the count with a right to the jaw, Mugabi received the dubious distinction as the second fighter, after Al Singer, to both win and lose a world title by the first-round knockout when he was defeated by Norris.Showing resilience, Mugabi resurfaced with two more wins and once again found himself fighting for a world title, facing Gerald McCellan on November 20, 1991, in London for the vacant WBO middleweight championship. Mugabi looked a shadow of his former self by this time, and once again came out on the losing end, again by a first-round knockout.

Mugabi took a five-year layoff in which he moved to Australia.In 1996, he came back for the first of an eight-fight comeback. He went on to claim the Australian middleweight championship by way of a 12th-round decision over Jamie Wallace. It only took John two fights before he was in line for a world title again. In his third fight back from the loss to Norris, Mugabi would challenge Glen Kelly. That November night in 1999, marked the decline of Mugabi’s illustrious boxing career as he was again knocked out in the eighth round. 
Mugabi resides in Australia where among other functions he trains fighters.

When Mugabi finally retired, he had a record of 42 wins, 7 losses and 1 draw, 39 wins by knockout.His 26 fight knockout win streak stands as one of the longest knockout streaks ever in boxing.


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 Posted: Tue Feb 19th, 2019 11:44 pm
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Hagler Tames The Beast

March 10, 1986


Hagler KO’s Mugabi in Round 11


    Mugabi had won all 26 of his professional fights by knockout.
    Hagler had made eleven successful title defenses, winning ten by knockout.
    The fight was originally scheduled for November 14, 1985, but it was postponed after Hagler suffered a back injury and a broken nose. His nose was broken by a headbutt while sparring with Zack Hewitt.
    Hagler made $2.5 million, plus a percentage of the revenue. Mugabi got $750,000.
    The fight was shown at 500 closed-circuit locations in the U.S. and Canada and was available to 3½ million homes on pay-per-view. 
    Showtime had delayed rights. It was the first boxing card aired on Showtime. 
    Hagler was a 3 to 1 favorite.
    Mugabi gave Hagler a tough fight and almost closed his right eye.
    Hagler hurt Mugabi in the sixth round and came close to finishing the challenger.
    Hagler put Mugabi down for the count in the eleventh round.
    After the fight, both fighters were urinating blood and were hospitalized.
    This was Hagler’s last victory.

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 Posted: Wed Feb 20th, 2019 12:19 am
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I distinctly remember the hype on TV for The Beast vs. Frank "The Animal" Fletcher. Huge Hype. I liked Mugabi a lot too.



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 Posted: Wed Feb 20th, 2019 12:50 pm
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Hagler won but that Mugabi fight took it all out of him.  

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