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 Posted: Tue Feb 26th, 2019 12:56 am
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Papa Voo



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The Weigh-In

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 Posted: Tue Feb 26th, 2019 12:57 am
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Slugfest

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 Posted: Tue Feb 26th, 2019 12:58 am
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Down goes Kim 

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 Posted: Tue Feb 26th, 2019 12:59 am
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Match over

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 Posted: Tue Feb 26th, 2019 01:01 am
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Tragedy In The Ring 


The suicides of Kim’s mother and referee Richard Harris makes the incident even more depressing.  

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 Posted: Tue Feb 26th, 2019 10:21 am
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Ray “Boom Boom” Mancini


Raymond Michael Mancini (born March 4, 1961), best known as Ray "Boom Boom" Mancini, is an American former professional  who competed from 1979 to 1992, and has since worked as an actor. He held the WBA lightweight title from 1982 to 1984. Mancini inherited his distinctive nickname from his father, veteran boxer Lenny “Boom Boom” Mancini who laid the foundation for his son's career. In 2015, Ray was inducted into the International Boxing Hall Of Fame.

Mancini, an Italian American, was born Raymond Michael Mancino in Youngstown, Ohio on March 4, 1961. Boxing played a prominent role in the Mancini family history. Mancini's father, Lenny Mancini (the original "Boom Boom"), was a top-ranked contender during the 1940s. Lenny Mancini's dream, however, was dashed when he was wounded during World War II. Although Lenny Mancini returned to boxing, limitations resulting from his injuries prevented him from fulfilling his potential.


Lenny inspired young Mancini to develop his boxing skills and encouraged him to train at a gym when he was quite young.

On October 18, 1979 he made his professional debut by defeating Phil Bowen with a first-round knockout. His whirlwind punching style caught the attention of network executives at several American television networks, and he became a regular on their sports programming. During this time Mancini defeated some notable boxers including former United States champion Norman Goins in March 1981. 

On April 30, 1980, Mancini defeated Bobby Sparks with a knockout at 1:28 in the first round for the regional Ohio State Lightweight title. Over a year later on May 16, 1981, Mancini won his first major title by defeating Jorge Morales for the WBC-affiliated NABF Lightweight championship when the referee determined that Morales could not continue after the 9th round. Two months later, he successfully defended the title against Jose Luis Ramirez after a unanimous decision. Mancini's first attempt at a world title came in his next bout on October 3 when he was pitted against Akexis Arguello  for his Word Boxing Council lightweight title. The event was selected by many (including The Ring and ESPN) as one of the most spectacular fights of the 1980s. Mancini gave Argüello trouble early and built a lead on the scorecards, but Argüello used his experience to his advantage in the later rounds and stopped Mancini in the 14th round.

Mancini would rebound from the loss to Arguello by winning his next two bouts, including a second (and last) successful defense of his NABF Lightweight title against Julio Valdez (10th-round TKO) which would earn him another chance at a world title.

On May 8, 1982, in a match held at The Aladdin in Las Vegas, he challenged the new World Boxing Association lightweight champion, Arturo Frias.  Fifteen seconds into the fight, Frias caught Mancini with a left hook to the chin and another combination made Mancini bleed from his eyebrow. Mancini recovered and dropped Frias right in the center of the ring with a combination. Dazed, Frias got back up but Mancini immediately went on the offensive and trapped Frias against the ropes. After many unanswered blows, referee Richard Greene stopped the fight at 2:54 in the first round, and the Mancini family finally had a world champion.

On November 13, 1982, a 21-year-old Mancini met 23-year-old South Korean challenger Duk-Koo Kim.   Kim had struggled to make the 135lb weight limit, and had to lose several pounds shortly before the fight. The title bout, at Caesers Palace in Las Vegas, was televised live at 1pm PST on CBS Sports.  It was, according to many observers, a fight filled with action. Mancini finally won by TKO in the 14th round. Moments after the fight ended, Kim collapsed and fell into a coma, having suffered a subdurao hematoma. He died four days later. The week after his death, the cover of Sports Illustrated magazine showed Mancini and Kim battling, under the title Tragedy in the Ring.


Mancini began the process of getting his life back together by once again putting on gloves. He went to Italy to face British champion George Feeney. Mancini won a 10-round decision.

He defended his title two more times. First, on September 15, 1983, he beat Peruvian challenger Orlando Romero by a knockout in nine rounds at New York’s Madison Square Garden to achieve a lifelong dream of fighting at that building, and then, on January 1984, in a bout with former world champion Bobby Chacon, which was broadcast on HBO, Mancini defeated Chacon after referee Richard Steele stopped the fight in the third round with blood dripping from Chacon's left eye.


In June 1984, Mancini, still recovering from the emotional trauma of Kim's death, fought Livingston Bramble to retain his title in BuffaloNew York.  This time however, Mancini came out on the losing end, defeated after 14 intense rounds. Mancini lost his title, but not before a fierce effort that resulted in an overnight stay at Millard Fillmore Hospital and got 71 stitches around one eye.


Mancini returned to the ring twice to attempt to regain his world title. In a rematch with Bramble, Mancini lost the fight by one point on all three judges' scorecards in a 15-round decision.  His next attempt came in March 1989, when he lost to Hector “Macho” Camacho in a split decision, Mancini had one final fight in April 1992, against former lightweight champion Greg Haugen. Mancini lost when referee Mills Lane stopped the fight in the seventh round.

Mancini retired officially in August 1985 at the age of 24.  However, he returned to the ring to fight Héctor Camacho in 1989 and had one final fight in 1992. A made-for-television movie based on Mancini's life aired in the 1980s.  The former champion was able to keep 75 percent of his $12 million in phrse money, which enabled him to pursue a broad range of interests in retirement.


Mancini has a son also called Ray who appeared in the YouTube reality series SummerBreak.


Mancini appeared in and produced a handful of films, and became a fight analyst for the Fox reality series Celebrity Boxing. Mancini, who as of 2007 resides in Los Angeles, owns the El Campeon Cigar Company and operates two movie production companies.


Mancini practices Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and holds a purple belt in the martial art.  He appeared in David Mamet’s MMA film Redbelt. He also appeared in the 2000 remake Body and Soul.


Mancini produced Youngstown: Still Standing in 2010, which premiered at the 34th Cleveland International Film Festival on March 24. The documentary film featured his hometown friend, actor Ed O’Neill and included Jim Cummings, Kelly Pavlik, Jay Eilliams, Andrea Wood and Mancini himself, among many other Youngstown natives and locals. John Chechitelli – another Youngstown native – directed and edited the 89-minute-long film. It recounts the history of Youngstown, Ohio from its founding in 1797 to the present.


Mancini is fluent in Italian. He and Orlando Romero reunited in 2013 at Lima,Peru.

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Last edited on Tue Feb 26th, 2019 04:38 pm by Papa Voo

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 Posted: Tue Feb 26th, 2019 04:26 pm
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Livingston Bramble 

Born 09/03/60
    Bramble defeated Ray Mancini by a fourteenth-round TKO to win the WBA Lightweight Championship on June 1, 1984. Bramble was a 4 to 1 underdog.  
    In his first title defense, Bramble defeated Ray Mancini by a fifteen-round unanimous decision on February 16, 1985. All three judges had Bramble winning by just one point. 
    In his second title defense, Bramble defeated Tyrone Crawley by a thirteenth-round TKO on February 16, 1986. Crawley was the WBA’s No. 1-ranked lightweight contender.
    Bramble lost the title in his third defense to former WBC  Lightweight Champion Edwin Rosario on September 26, 1986. Rosario, a 4 to 1 underdog, won by a second-round knockout. Entering the Rosario fight, Bramble had a record of 24-1-1. 
    Bramble boxed until 2003 and finished with a record of 40-26-3.Bramble has a record of 3-1 (2 KOs) in world title fights.
    Bramble has a record of 2-8-1 against former, current or future world titlists:  won against Ray Mancini (twice) Lost against Edwin Rosario, Freddie Pendleton, Charles Murray (twice), Roger Mayweather,  Kostya Tsyzu, James “Buddy McGirt, Rapheal Ruelas. Drew against Freddie Pendleton

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 Posted: Tue Feb 26th, 2019 06:49 pm
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My Dad and I were big boxing fans back in the 80s. Every Saturday afternoon, we would watch whatever boxing matches were being aired on the networks (ABC Wide World of Sports, NBC Sportsworld, CBS Sports Saturday). We were too poor to afford HBO.

Our local Boys Club was having a boxing demo / tournament at the local shopping mall on the morning of the Mancini vs Koo-Kim fight. My Dad and I went to the Boys Club tournament and liked what we saw. My Dad was all set to sign me up for the boxing program starting the following Saturday. I was so pumped!

We went home, had some lunch, and settled in to watch the Mancini vs. Koo-Kim fight. It was a heck of a fight. Koo-Kim was actually beating Mancini in the early rounds. Mancini started to beat the daylights out of the guy in the later rounds but Koo-Kim wouldn't go down. The referee finally stopped the fight after Koo-Kim had managed to pull himself to his feet after a brutal knockdown in the 14th round. Koo-Kim later collapsed in his corner, had to be stretchered from the ring, and lapsed into a coma. Four days later, Koo-Kim was reported dead.

My father changed his mind about letting me box after that fight. We would still watch the matches but "no son of his" would ever step into a boxing ring.

Last edited on Tue Feb 26th, 2019 06:49 pm by Big Garea Fan

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 Posted: Tue Feb 26th, 2019 07:34 pm
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Great story!  

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 Posted: Tue Feb 26th, 2019 09:46 pm
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Larry Holmes (The Easton Assassin)

Larry Holmes (born November 3, 1949) is an American former professional boxer who competed from 1973 to 2002. He grew up in Easton, Pennsylvania which gave birth to his boxing nickname of "The Easton Assassin".

Holmes, whose left jab is rated among the best in boxing history, held the WBC heavyweight title from 1978 to 1983, The Ring magazine and lineal heavyweight titles from 1980 to 1985, and the inaugural IBF heavyweight title from 1983 to 1985. He made 20 successful title defenses, placing him third all time, behind only Joe Louis at 25 and Wladimir Klitschko at 22. He also holds the record for the longest individual heavyweight streak in the modern boxing history. Holmes is one of only five boxers—along with Joe Frazier, Ken Norton, Leon Spinks and Trevor Berbick—to defeat Muhammad Ali; he is the only one to have stopped Ali.

Holmes won his first 48 professional bouts, including victories over Norton, Ali, Earnie Shavers, Mike Weaver,  Gerry Cooney, Tim Witherspoon,  Carl Williams, and Marvis Frazier, and falling one short of matching Rokcy Marciano’s career record of 49–0 when he lost to Michael Sptinks in 1985. Holmes retired after losing a rematch to Spinks the following year, but made repeated comebacks. He was unsuccessful in three further attempts (against Mike Tyson, Evander Holyfield and Oliver McCall) to regain the heavyweight title, the last in 1995. Holmes fought for the final time in 2002, against the 334lb Eric “Butterbean” Esch and ended his career with a record of 69 wins and 6 losses. He is frequently ranked as one of the greatest heavyweights of all time and has been inducted into both the International Boxing Hall of Fame and World Boxing Hall of Fame.

After compiling an amateur record of 19–3, Holmes turned professional on March 21, 1973, winning a four-round decision against Rodell Dupree. Early in his career he worked as a sparring partner for Muhammad Ali, Joe Frazier, Earnie Shavers, and Jimmy Young. He was paid well and learned a lot. "I was young, and I didn't know much. But I was holding my own sparring those guys", Holmes said. "I thought, 'hey, these guys are the best, the champs. If I can hold my own now, what about later?'"

Holmes first gained credibility as a contender when he upset the hard-punching Earnie Shavers in March 1978. Holmes won by a lopsided twelve-round unanimous decision, winning every round on two scorecards and all but one on the third. Holmes's victory over Shavers set up a title shot between Holmes and WBC Heavyweight Champion Ken Norton in Las Vegas on June 9, 1978.

The fight between Holmes and Norton was a tough, competitive fight. After fourteen rounds, each of the three judges scored the fight dead even at seven rounds each. Holmes rallied late in the fifteenth to win the round on two scorecards and take the title by a split decision.

In his first two title defenses, Holmes easily knocked out Alfredo Evagilista and Ossie Ocasio. His third title defense was a tough one. On June 22, 1979, Holmes faced future WBA Heavyweight Champion Mike Weaver, who was lightly regarded going into the fight sporting an uninspiring 19–8 record. After ten tough rounds, Holmes dropped Weaver with a right uppercut late in round eleven. In the twelfth, Holmes immediately went on the attack, backing Weaver into the ropes and pounding him with powerful rights until the referee stepped in and stopped it. "This man knocked the devil out of me," Holmes said. "This man might not have had credit before tonight, but you'll give it to him now.”

Three months later, on September 28, 1979, Holmes had a rematch with Shavers, who got a title shot by knocking out Ken Norton in one round. Holmes dominated the first six rounds, but in the seventh, Shavers sent Holmes down with a devastating overhand right. Holmes got up, survived the round, and went on to stop Shavers in the eleventh.

His next three defenses were knockouts of Lorenzo Zanon, Leroy Jones, and Scott LeDoux
On October 2, 1980, at Caesers Palace in Las Vegas, Holmes defended his title against Muhammad Ali, who was coming out of retirement in an attempt to become the first four-time World Heavyweight Champion. Holmes dominated Ali from start to finish, winning every round on every scorecard. At the end of the tenth round, Ali's trainer, Angelo Dundee, stopped the fight. It was Ali's only loss without "going the distance" for a judges' decision.  After the win, Holmes received recognition as World Heavyweight by The Ring magazine.

Ali blamed his poor performance on thyroid medication which he had been taking, claiming that it helped him lose weight (he weighed 217½, his lowest weight since he fought George Foreman in 1974), but it also left him drained for the fight.

Holmes seemed to show signs of regret, or at least sadness, in punishing Ali so much during the fight. He appeared in a post-fight interview with tears in his eyes. When asked why he was crying, he said that he respected Ali "a whole lot" and "he fought one of the baddest heavyweights in the world today, and you cannot take credit from him."

After eight consecutive knockouts, Holmes was forced to go the distance when he successfully defended his title against future WBC Heavyweight Champion Trevor Berbick on April 11, 1981. 
In his next fight, two months later, Holmes knocked out former Undisputed World Heavyweight Champion Leon Spinks in three rounds. On November 6, 1981, Holmes rose from a seventh-round knockdown (during which he staggered into the turnbuckle) to stop Renaldo Snipes in the eleventh.

[size=On June 11, 1982, Holmes defended his title against Gerry Coney, the undefeated #1 contender and an Irish-American. The lead-up to the fight had many racial overtones. Holmes said that if Cooney wasn't white, he would not be getting the same purse as the champion (both boxers received $10 million for the bout).  Although Cooney tried to deflect questions about race, members of his camp wore shirts that said "Not the White Man, but the Right Man."   In their fight previews, Sports Illustrated] and Time put Cooney on the cover, not Holmes. President Ronald Reagan had a phone installed in Cooney's dressing room so he could call him if he won the fight.  Holmes had no such arrangement. Lastly, boxing tradition dictates that the champion be introduced last, but the challenger, Cooney, was introduced last.  

The bout was held in a 32,000-seat stadium erected in a Caesar's Palace Parking lot, with millions more watching around the world. After an uneventful first round, Holmes dropped Cooney with a right in the second. Cooney came back well in the next two rounds, jarring Holmes with his powerful left hook. Holmes later said that Cooney "hit me so damned hard, I felt it—boom—in my bones."  Cooney was tiring by the ninth, a round in which he had two points deducted for low blows. In the tenth, they traded punches relentlessly. At the end of the round, the two nodded to each other in respect.  Cooney lost another point because of low blows in the eleventh. By then, Holmes was landing with ease. In the thirteenth, a barrage of punches sent Cooney down. He got up, but his trainer, Victor Valle, stepped into the ring and stopped the fight.  

After the fight, Holmes and Cooney became close friends.

Holmes' next two fights were one-sided decision wins over Randall “Tex” Cobb and ex-European champion Lucien Rodriguez. On May 20, 1983, Holmes defended his title against Tim Witherspoon, the future WBC and WBA Heavyweight Champion. Witherspoon, a six to one underdog and with only 15 professional bouts to his name, surprised many by giving Holmes a difficult fight. After twelve rounds, Holmes retained the title by a disputed split decision.

On September 10, 1983, Holmes successfully defended the WBC title for the sixteenth time, knocking out Scott Frank in five rounds. Holmes then signed to fight Marvis Frazier, son of Joe Frazier, on November 25, 1983. The WBC refused to sanction the fight against the unranked Frazier. They ordered Holmes to fight Gregg Page, the #1 contender, or be stripped of the title. Promoter Don King offered Holmes $2.55 million to fight Page, but the champion didn't think that was enough. He was making $3.1 million to fight Frazier and felt he should get as much as $5 million to fight Page.

Holmes had an easy time with Frazier, knocking him out in the first round.  The following month, Holmes relinquished the WBC championship and accepted recognition as World Heavyweight Champion by the newly formeed the Intermational Boxing Federaton. 

Holmes signed to fight Gerrie Coetzee, the WBA Champion, on June 15, 1984 at Caesar's Palace. The fight was being promoted by JPD Inc., but it was canceled when Caesar's Palace said the promoters failed to meet the financial conditions of the contract. Holmes was promised $13 million and Coetzee was promised $8 million. Even after cutting the purses dramatically, they still couldn't come up with enough financial backing to stage the fight.  Don King then planned to promote the fight, but Holmes lost a lawsuit filed by Virginia attorney Richard Hirschfeld, who said he had a contract with Holmes that gave him right of first refusal on a Holmes-Coetzee bout. Holmes then decided to move on and fight someone else.

On November 9, 1984, after a year out of the ring, Holmes made his first defense of the IBF title, stopping James “Binecusher” Smith on a cut in the twelfth round. In the first half of 1985, Holmes stopped David Bey in ten rounds for his 19th title defense. 
His next against Carl “The Truth” Williams was unexpectedly tough. The younger, quicker Williams was able to out-jab the aging champion, who was left with a badly swollen eye by the end of the bout. Holmes emerged with a close, and disputed, fifteen-round unanimous decision.

On September 21, 1985, Holmes stepped in the ring looking to equal Rocky Marciano’s  49-0 career record and to make his twentieth successful title defense. His opponent was looking to make history as well. After winning the undisputed championship at light hewvyweight, Michael Spinks decided to move up in weight and try to become the second fighter after Bob Fitzsimmons to win titles at both light heavyweight and heavyweight. An elder statesman who had tried for these latter honors, Archie Moore, predicted an easy win for Holmes: "I'm afraid Larry will chew him up. Michael may be faster than Larry, but you can only go so fast."  Despite the assessment, it indeed would be Spinks whose historical destiny would be fulfilled, albeit controversially, as he defeated Holmes via unanimous decision to become the first reigning light heavyweight champion to win the heavyweight title.  After the fight, a bitter Holmes said, "Rocky Marciano couldn't carry my jockstrap."

Holmes had a rematch with Spinks on April 19, 1986. Spinks retained the title with a disputed fifteen-round split decision. The judges scored the fight: Judge Joe Cortez 144–141 (Holmes), Judge Frank Brunette 141–144 (Spinks) and Judge Jerry Roth 142–144 (Spinks.). In a post-fight interview with HBO, Holmes said, "the judges, the referees and promoters can kiss me where the sun don't shine—and because we're on HBO, that's my big black behind."

On November 6, 1986, three days after his 37th birthday, Holmes announced his retirement.

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 Posted: Tue Feb 26th, 2019 10:39 pm
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Larry Holmes vs. Muhammad Ali


Octiber 2, 1980





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 Posted: Tue Feb 26th, 2019 10:40 pm
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Pitiful ending to a legendary career


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 Posted: Wed Feb 27th, 2019 12:18 am
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Shavers punching power is legendary. Holmes said that Shavers hit him so hard in that fight that it woke him up almost immediately as he hit the canvas. A little less on the blow and he would have been out cold.



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 Posted: Wed Feb 27th, 2019 01:21 am
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Renaldo Snipes vs. Larry Holmes


November 6, 1981


“Imminent Danger”


    The fight was billed as "Imminent Danger." 
    Holmes was such a heavy favorite that there was no betting line on the fight. 
    Holmes was paid $1.1 million, while Snipes got $175,000. 
    There was a crowd of 14,103 at the Civic Arena. 
    The fight was televised live in prime time on ABC-TV. 
    Early in the seventh round, Snipes dropped Holmes with a right. Holmes got up quickly and fell face first into a neutral-corner turnbuckle.  
    Forty-five seconds into the eleventh round, a Holmes right sent Snipes reeling sideways into his corner. Holmes moved to him quickly. Two rights and a hook to the body pinned Snipes to the corner. Holmes hammered three powerful rights to the head. As he was loading up to throw a fourth, Ortega stopped the onslaught. 
    While Holmes and Snipes were being interviewed by Howard Cosell after the fight, Holmes' brother Jake got into a fight with Snipes' manager, who thought the fight was stopped prematurely. Snipes then went after Holmes, and Cosell ducked for cover. During the melee, which was joined by a host of security guards, Snipes was pushed back against the Rev. Jim Williams, his trainer, who wielded a pair of scissors he intended to use to snip the tape from Snipes' hands. Instead, the scissors accidentally opened a deep cut in Snipes' left forearm that required 40 stitches.


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 Posted: Wed Feb 27th, 2019 01:33 am
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I remember a lot from this event because it was in Pittsburgh. Leading up to the fight, it was viewed as just a tune-up for Holmes to keep fresh for his build up to meet Cooney. Larry looked bad falling into the turnbuckle and Snipes was standing toe-to-toe with him.  
I remember the crowd turning into an all-out Snipes cheering section as the fight got into the later rounds.  

I still think the ending of the match was somewhat controversial for the punishment that had been witnessed upon both fighters earlier in the match.  But, Holmes was measuring up Snipes before every punch before it was stopped which made it look bad. 

I still laugh at the scrum that occurred during the post-fight interviews with Cosell, of course, stirring the pot. 


Here is the link to the fight and the post-fight scrum. 

Myron Cope doing the ring announcing!!! 

https://youtu.be/giWnDfmk_iE

**Date on youtube video is incorrect. 

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