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 Posted: Tue Jul 31st, 2018 05:32 pm
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DaNkinator



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Principal_Raditch wrote: Trunp doesn't like the fact that Jews are more successful than him financiallyIt's not relegated to just Jewish folk. 

Last edited on Tue Jul 31st, 2018 05:32 pm by DaNkinator

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 Posted: Wed Aug 1st, 2018 01:32 am
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srossi
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Hours after attacking the Koch brothers, Trump is attacking 3D printed guns, which manages to assail both the first and second amendments all in one tweet. Few politicians in history have gone this full-on libtard in one day, and Republicans are still sucking his micro-penis. Hillary is a million times the conservative that Trump is, and has a bigger dick too.

Last edited on Wed Aug 1st, 2018 01:37 am by srossi



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 Posted: Wed Aug 1st, 2018 02:17 pm
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DaNkinator



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The heat is on. His skin is crawling.

Trump doesn't even give a shit about using Twitter to publicly obstruct justice by calling for Sessions to end the Meuller probe.

Last edited on Wed Aug 1st, 2018 02:17 pm by DaNkinator

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 Posted: Fri Aug 3rd, 2018 05:11 pm
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KGB

 

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srossi wrote: KGB wrote: I see you added more to your quote, but I'm afraid I'm still not convinced. If all things were equal then maybe the Cato people would have a point, but the example they came up with is horribly simplistic and has no application in the real world. First and foremost, it assumes the Chinese turn around and spend in the international market every dollar that they rake in from Americans, which is simply not the case. They sit on it and use it to fund their massive military buildup, a buildup that will continue to threaten American interests for a long time. France isn't going to threaten us or our allies militarily but China is. Any idea what the cost of a war with China would be? Any idea what the cost would be if they shut down shipping lanes in the Far East? We're funding their ability to do so. So why should we look at things from the globalist POV when there's far more urgency in bringing one country, China, to heel?

I didn't really add more to the quote, cut & paste just never works here the first time around and I always have to do it in pieces or edit it to make it readable.  What's there now is the full article.  

And what you're saying is that Cato is wrong, Bob Higgs of The Independent Review is wrong, all of the most respected minds in conservative economics for decades are wrong.  But you hate tariffs but you're spending your entire day doing mental gymnastics over why we need them.  But they're bad.  But they're good this time.  But no one is flip-flopping on tariffs.  But everyone still hates them while defending them.  But the free market needs to be allowed to work.  But the free market won't work this time.  Because tariffs are bad but they're good.  OK then.  And you want individual names as if the mounds of Facebook comments on Fox News and the Senate votes themselves aren't proof enough.  Like this right here from Bob Corker: 

https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/politics/2018/06/12/sen-bob-corker-angrily-confronts-gop-refusing-allow-vote-tariffs/695943002/

“I can’t believe it!” said Corker, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. “I would bet that 95 percent of the people on this (Republican) side of the aisle support intellectually this amendment – I would bet higher than 95 percent – and a lot of them would vote for it if it came to a vote.”

“But no, no, no!” Corker continued. “Gosh, ‘we might poke the bear’ is the language I’ve been hearing in the hallways …. ‘The president might get upset with us as United States senators if we vote on the Corker amendment, so we’re going to do everything we can to block it.’”

This is Bob Corker who scored 80% on American Conseravtive Union's 2017 ratings of Congressmen.

Regarding tariffs, since you don't seem capable of grasping my position, I'm not sure they're the right way to go in practice but I do think they need to be on the table as a negotiating tactic.  If it comes to actually enacting them, it needs to be done very selectively.  Yes, I prefer free markets to solve inequalities, but you (and the Cato people) seem to be implying that by enacting tariffs we'd destroy a currently existing free market and I think it's foolish to describe our trade relationship with nations like China as "free".  And since it's not free, the potential exists for one party to gain at the expense of another.  Self-interest dictates that we look for some means of redress. 
 
You've stated definitively that tariffs never work, yet I've given you examples, in this country and others, where they have been of great benefit.  Care to address that or are you afraid of flip-flopping?
 
Just today I came across an article about why the circumstances are correct for tariffs with China.  Again, I'm not sure I'm sold on it, but I -- unlike you -- am trying to look at this from both sides given the data and the facts of realpolitik.
 
Economists do not think of capital spending in terms of real-world numbers.  They think of it as a concept in their models that self-equilibrates.  There isn't an economist from Harvard to Stanford or anywhere in between who knows this chart.  Believe me: I have worked with these people.  If you as a reader are in business or in academe, try me out...


Economists think mercantilism can never work, thus Trump attacking it as practiced by China is a fool's errand or worse.  This is based on the early 19th-century Theory of Comparative Advantage developed by David Ricardo.  It states that among trading parties, even if one party's production costs are greater in all goods than the other party's, the first party should focus on those goods where it has a comparative advantage – i.e., where its own cost of production is lower.  If the two countries then trade, both will improve their welfare.  If, under these conditions, a country practices mercantilism, it impoverishes itself.  This is a substantial insight.


But it depends on a key assumption: that capital is fixed.  Ricardo's example was that the British should raise sheep and the French should make wine, and they should trade these goods with each other.  The example was based on climate, the ultimate in fixed capital.
 
With capital mobile, as it is now, mercantilism works.  By forcing a trading partner to move its assets, technology, know-how, intellectual property, and R&D to the mercantilist country in order to participate in its market, a country can build itself up at the expense of its trading partner.  Following its accession to the WTO, China has been strip-mining the U.S. economy of high value-added industries and high-wage jobs by doing this.


This is not due to any hatred of the U.S., but rather to advancing its own interests.  It is a double loss for us because what happens is that as industry moves to China, we end up buying goods from China on borrowed money.  The goods wear out, but the debt still needs to be repaid, and we have less of a production base to repay it.  (emphasis mine)


If mercantilism is the game China wants to play then why on earth are we beholden to principles that bind us to the free market?  If you or the Cato Institute have some other route by which we make China play by the same rules, I'm all ears. 
 
 
 https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2018/08/why_is_trump_fighting_the_trade_war.html#ixzz5N8SkXcAl








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 Posted: Fri Aug 3rd, 2018 06:12 pm
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srossi
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We're still doing this?  Listening to you cite "examples" of how tariffs work is like listening to Sanders supporters prattle on about how socialism works.  They have "examples" too, until it falls apart.  Venezuela looked great for 2 1/2 weeks there.  We already have seen Trump reach into taxpayer pockets to subsidize farmers who are getting fucked over by his tariffs, and it's like week one. 

And I grasp your position as clearly an anyone can grasp the Republican position on this.  You hate tariffs but they work (then why would you hate them?), and it's not about the tariffs per se anyway, it's about the negotiation because no one in history has ever thought to negotiate before Trump. 

Last edited on Fri Aug 3rd, 2018 06:13 pm by srossi



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 Posted: Mon Aug 6th, 2018 06:13 pm
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Just peaking in to ask KGB about his thoughts on the conspiracy that Trump's campaign worked with the Russians after he admitted to it out in the open?

Should be rich...

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 Posted: Mon Aug 6th, 2018 06:27 pm
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srossi
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DaNkinator wrote: Just peaking in to ask KGB about his thoughts on the conspiracy that Trump's campaign worked with the Russians after he admitted to it out in the open?

Should be rich...

This is a real Facebook post on CNN, which I will post here to save KGB time (although, to his credit, KGB would have fewer spelling errors):

"Nothing has changed here. He said he didnt know about the meeting occuring. He knows it did now, AND he was intially told that it was to meet this lawyer about child adoption, then she was supposed to have dirt on Hillary, which she didnt. Then the meeting ended. So whats new here?"



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 Posted: Tue Aug 7th, 2018 03:44 pm
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This Manafort trial is fascinating stuff. Gates has testified that Manafort had up to 15 offshore accounts that they embezzled through.

A key comment was that a Russian citizen with ties to Russian intelligence had signatory authority over some of the President's campain manager's accounts in Cyprus.

Think about that...Manafort took the job running Trump’s campaign at zero salary in 2016 — the same year that he was so broke that he committed bank fraud to obtain desperately needed loans; the same year he emailed Deripaska to say he hoped his role in the campaign could help make them whole.

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 Posted: Wed Aug 8th, 2018 08:28 pm
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srossi
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http://reason.com/blog/2018/08/08/tariffs-kill-another-126-jobs

The latest casualties from President Donald Trump's trade war are 126 jobs at a plant where televisions are built.

Element Electronics announced Monday that it would close its facility in Winnsboro, South Carolina. Layoffs will begin in October, the company told the state's Department of Employment and Workforce in a letter. (The letter was obtained by The State, a newspaper based in Colombia, South Carolina.)

"The layoff and closure is a result of the new tariffs that were recently and unexpectedly imposed on many goods imported from China, including the key television components used in our assembly operations in Winnsboro," said the letter.

The jobs lost in Winnsboro are unlikely to be replaced quickly. Even before the tariffs hit, Fairfield County (where Winnsboro is located) was struggling: It recently lost a textile mill that employed more than 200 people, and the planned construction of a nuclear power plant was canceled. In May, the most recent month for which data is available, Fairfield County had the highest unemployment rate in South Carolina.

Trump's tariffs, which are really just taxes on imported goods, are likely to cause the most pain in places like Fairfield County. Large, successful businesses are not immune to the consequences of trade barriers, but they have more ways to deal with suddenly higher production costs than small companies that were already struggling to stay afloat.

And the president is not done with his assault on South Carolina's manufacturing sector. If Trump follows through with a threat to impose tariffs on automobiles and the parts used to build them, it could wreck havoc on the state's economy. In comments submitted last month to the U.S. Commerce Department, which is studying the possibility of placing tariffs on cars and car parts, Germany-based BMW said those import taxes could force it to reduce production and cut jobs at its Spartanburg, South Carolina, plant. That facility employs about 10,000 workers and is BMW's largest manufacturing facility in the world. The trickle-down effects of tariffs could jeopardize another 35,000 jobs at American companies that supply parts for that plant, BMW warned.

Just the threat of those auto tariffs is hurting the state. The Swedish automaker Volvo has paused plans to hire 4,000 additional workers at its production facility near Charleston, citing uncertainty over American trade policy.

South Carolina is quickly becoming a microcosm for the national debate over tariffs. It's a state that Trump won by more than 14 points in 2016, but it's also a place where agriculture and industry—the two sectors of the economy most likely to take a hit from the trade war—are vitally important. Unlike most other East Coast states, South Carolina lacks major cities that serve as hubs for major financial services or tech firms. It's a state that has benefited tremendously from international automobile manufacturers' production facilities, but it's also a state where the loss of a television manufacturing plant can derail a small town.

Trump has said his trade war of choice would be "good and easy to win." Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross has shrugged off tariff-caused job losses as mere "hiccups" along the road to making America great again. In places like Winnsboro, South Carolina, those comments probably ring especially hollow.

Last edited on Wed Aug 8th, 2018 08:29 pm by srossi



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 Posted: Thu Aug 9th, 2018 12:12 pm
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Lots more of those.  McConnell doesn't seem to care that it's happening to the bourbon/whiskey industry in his own state.  And I live on the Indiana side of Louisville, where a lawn equipment manufacturer has had to close and lay off 75 people and a boat manufacturer closed and let go of nearly 400 jobs.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2018/07/30/after-trumps-farmer-bailout-manufacturers-ask-what-about-us/?utm_term=.c5c2012ffced
Jane Hardy, the chief executive of a company that makes lawn-care equipment, says she had to lay off 75 employees this summer because of President Trump’s trade war. As she fights to keep her southern Indiana business going, Hardy is one of several manufacturers warning the White House that, unless they see relief from the tariffs soon, job losses will mount and factory closures are likely.
Trump has repeatedly said he would protect American farmers in the trade war, last week setting aside $12 billion to help them, but he is facing pressure to extend aid to other industries if the tariffs remain in place or get extended to more products.
Extending those bailouts would be an expensive proposition. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce on Monday estimated the total price tag could hit $39 billion if Trump compensated the losses across all industries. It would take $7.6 billion to help car and automobile parts manufacturers alone, the Chamber said, calling it a “slippery slope” for Trump to determine who gets help and who doesn’t. The Chamber has been a vocal critic of the tariffs.
Critics of Trump’s trade policy are calling on him to de-escalate the trade war rather than try to bail out the businesses hurt by it. But if the trade fight continues and the midterm elections draw near, the White House stands to face pressure, including from Republicans, to extend more government aid.
That’s particularly true in states with contested races — including in Indiana, where Sen. Joe Donnelly (D) is trying to hold his red state seat against a GOP challenge.
Hardy’s company, Brinly-Hardy, has been in business since 1839. It survived recessions and the Civil War, but it might not survive a prolonged trade war. Hardy buys steel from U.S. companies, but Trump’s tariffs on foreign steel have caused domestic prices to rise, as well. Steel costs have jumped 33 percent since the start of the year, and Hardy says her costs are up even more. She was hit again by Trump’s first round of tariffs on Chinese products that went into effect in early July, another hefty cost eating into her bottom line. Other products she imports and says she can’t get domestically are on a list for a second round of tariffs on China likely to go into effect later this summer.
“We are collateral damage in this effort,” Hardy said. “We’re going to be in the same situation as the farmers of needing to save U.S. manufacturing.”
Trump and his top advisers insist this is short-term pain and that the end result will be a better trade situation for all U.S. companies. They point to the strong economy as a sign Trump’s policies are working, but the longer the tariffs stay in place, the more the negative impacts are likely to grow.
“We’ve seen tens of thousands of factories shut down as a result of failed trade policies of the past. The president is fighting for these workers and all those affected across the country," said a White House spokeswoman. She said Trump is a “free trader” and that the aid for farmers was “specific retaliation we were responding to.”
Small and mid-size companies are especially vulnerable to the tariffs because they are not able to absorb costs or shift production overseas as easily as larger companies. Hardy feels caught in a bind: If she raises her prices, foreign competitors will undercut her.

Instead, she cut almost 40 percent of her 200-person workforce, most of whom are blue-collar production workers at the Brinly-Hardy plant in southern Indiana. It was the same tactic Mid-Continent Nail, the largest U.S. nail manufacturer, used earlier this summer when it laid off dozens of workers in Missouri because of Trump’s tariffs on Mexican steel. Mid-Continent has warned it may have to close its doors by Labor Day. Hardy is trying to stay optimistic, but if the tariffs are still in place by Thanksgiving, she will probably face devastating choices.
“We’re all in this together — farmers and manufacturers. I think everyone needs relief from this and certainty, one way or another,” said Joseph Cohen, the founder of Snow Joe, a company that makes snowmobiles and other lawn and garden equipment in New Jersey and employs about 300 U.S. workers. Cohen warned the White House last week that the tariffs are harming his business and may force him to halt a major expansion he has been planning that would add 100 workers.
Even larger companies are starting to take a hit or raise prices on consumers, making the impact of the tariffs more visible to Americans across the country. Harley-Davidson is moving some production overseas because of the tariff fight with Europe, Whirlpool blamed losses on the tariffs, and Coca-Cola and Caterpillar say they are raising prices because of higher steel and aluminum costs.
“The global steel costs have risen substantially, and in particular in the U.S., they have reached unexplainable levels,” said Whirlpool chief executive Marc Bitzer when the company reported disappointing earnings. Trump put tariffs on foreign washing machines in January thinking it would boost the fortunes of companies like Whirlpool, but the steel tariffs have canceled out the benefits.
Many in the business community, including Hardy, Cohen and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, have been urging Trump to stop the trade war before the damage becomes more widespread. Most farmers and farm advocacy groups have also told the administration they want “trade, not aid.” But Trump celebrated the success of his steel tariffs last week at an event in Illinois, saying his strategy is working and that jobs are returning.
“This is the time to straighten out the worst trade deals we’ve ever had in the history of our country,” Trump said last week at a U.S. Steel plant in Granite City, Ill., adding that steel is a “special industry to me.”
These tariffs, he says, will force trading partners to negotiate, at which time Trump hopes to extract concessions, including lower tariffs on U.S. products sold overseas. His administration argues it has already had a victory with the European Union, which sent top officials to the White House last week to begin working on a trade deal.
China, Europe, Canada and other nations have responded to Trump’s trade actions with retaliatory tariffs directed at businesses in parts of the country that have hotly contested midterm election races. Many GOP lawmakers are concerned that headlines like the job losses from the nail company in Missouri and the lawn equipment business in Indiana will hurt the party at the polls.
"We appreciate the administration lowering the temperature with the E.U., but . . . I don’t have a solution yet for my bourbon industry,” said Rep. Garland “Andy” Barr (R-Ky.) who met with some of Trump’s top economic advisers last week to share his concerns about the tariffs other countries have put on Kentucky bourbon.
“I also stressed that there are a lot more jobs at Toyota Motor Manufacturing in Kentucky that are negatively impacted by these steel tariffs than there are at the aluminum smelters and the steel production facilities in Kentucky,” Barr said last week.
Rep. Bill Huizenga (R-Mich.) had similar worries about how the tariffs are harming auto parts companies in his home state and said he expressed those last week in a meeting with Trump’s top economic advisers.
“This is not just uncomfortable; it’s painful, and it’s damaging when my auto suppliers are supplying both domestic and foreign badge cars,” Huizenga said.
On Monday, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross compared the trade actions to “going on a diet” where it is “no fun at the beginning” but is worth it in the end. Top officials also stress that companies, especially manufacturers, can apply for exclusions from the tariffs. But that process has been slow and cumbersome, many business owners say, and there is a massive backlog in processing the applications.
Nearly 29,000 requests have come in to the Commerce Department for exclusions from the steel and aluminum tariffs, according to Ross. The vast majority of the applications were for relief from the steel tariffs, yet the department has made decisions about only 1,317 steel applications so far, according to the American Iron and Steel Institute, which has been tracking the process. Just under half of the decisions have been denials, meaning companies will still have to pay the 25 percent steel tariff.
“Timing is critical,” said Hardy, who is in the process of applying for exclusions for her company. “If things don’t get resolved before our next seasonal selling cycle this fall, it could be difficult for us.”
Look, as a know liberal, I get that social issues were a lot of his bread and butter for riling up his base.  The opportunity to stick it to non-whites was too good to pass up.  But I have always leaned right on fiscal issues.  And he made that a pretty big part of his rallying cry also.  But what I see out here is him killing jobs and industries, running up the deficit, personally making a huge profit off of the office he holds and setting us back decades.  Where is all of the winning?  He's screwing over his base from behind while they eat his shit with a huge smile on their faces.

Last edited on Thu Aug 9th, 2018 12:19 pm by DaNkinator

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 Posted: Thu Aug 9th, 2018 10:06 pm
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Whiner. You'll take your winning and like it!



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 Posted: Tue Aug 21st, 2018 07:15 pm
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Cohen has entered a plea agreement and is scheduled before a federal judge at 4pm today.

Possible that a verdict will be reached in the Manafort trial today or tomorrow.

Get the popcorn ready. The Orange rager looks to be having a bad day.

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 Posted: Wed Aug 22nd, 2018 02:22 pm
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Tick tock bitches.

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 Posted: Wed Aug 22nd, 2018 02:32 pm
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srossi
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DaNkinator wrote: Tick tock bitches.
I don't know what you think is going to happen.  Trump isn't getting impeached in this environment no matter what.  The Dems need to focus their energy om winning elections. 



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 Posted: Wed Aug 22nd, 2018 02:56 pm
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And if they win the house, very real possibility that he gets impeached.

But I'm not expecting that, just hopeful. Sure, that's probably naive of me, but it is what it is.

But he's been implicated in crimes. He won't serve a second term, he's fucked the GOP and they spread their asses wide and took it with a smile on their faces. And once he's out, he can indicted.

I keep seeing you and others keep saying that this or that won't happen, and yet it just keeps getting worse for him and his entire administration. I'll just sit back and continue to watch and keep my "I told you sos" to myself for now.

Last edited on Wed Aug 22nd, 2018 03:02 pm by DaNkinator

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