WowBB Forums Home 
WowBB Forums > Sports And Wrestling > Sports Talk > 2011 NFL Draft -- LIVE "IN GAME" Thread

 Moderated by: Ron, brodiescomics, beejmi  
AuthorPost
beejmi
The Big Kahuna


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Philly
Posts: 41572
Status: 
Offline
The NFL draft begins tonight at 8 PM EST. As he does "every year" Papa Voo will be both hosting and covering the draft for us.

Feel free to chime in with questions or thoughts as we go along.

There is still plenty of questions? Will Carolina take Cam Newton #1? Will this be "the year of the trade"? Who moves up, who moves down -- hard to tell as the teams themselves have been lying about their intentions for weeks now.

As always my thanks to Papa Voo for the time, energy and effort he puts into this. We couldn't possibly even begin to cover the draft as well as "we" do without his contributions.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Pete Prisco's Mock

http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/fullnflmockdraft-PetePrisco

 

Mike Maycock, NFL Draft guru, has never completed a mock draft until this year.

http://www.nfl.com/draft/2011/mock-drafts/mike-mayock/60103?module=HP_cp2

 

Mike Maycock is predicting a rather unique draft due to the circumsntances surrounding the NFL.  His quote about this weekend's draft.

"Maycock believes that due to the uncertainty of the NFL, the lack of a free agency period normally held prior to the draft and no ability to sign undrafted free agents, will lead to the most draft day trades in the history of the draft."

 

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Okay, this looks to be the year of many teams needing starting QBs, but there may not be any true franchise QBs in this draft class, except for maybe a hidden gem like Tom Brady from many years ago. 

Let's get the first question out there.....if you are the Carolina Panthers, do you take Cam Newton with the No. 1 overall pick? 

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
The "fascinating" selection of the First Round revolves around the "best athlete" in the First Round.....Patrick Peterson, CB, LSU.   The current positioning looks as though that Peterson could slide down the board as far as the No. 6 position with Cleveland.  With this slide, we could hear the phones ringing as he slides down each position, it is being reported that down in Dallas, Jerry Jones is just frothing at the mouth to get to a pick to select Peterson. 

I think teams would be stupid to draft for need and let this guy slip by.

Benlen



Joined: Sun Oct 21st, 2007
Location: Milpitas, California USA
Posts: 13280
Status: 
Offline
Papa Voo wrote: Okay, this looks to be the year of many teams needing starting QBs, but there may not be any true franchise QBs in this draft class, except for maybe a hidden gem like Tom Brady from many years ago. 

Let's get the first question out there.....if you are the Carolina Panthers, do you take Cam Newton with the No. 1 overall pick? 

Panthers are shitty at almost all positions. They might as well try to improve at the QB position. Jimmy Clausen is a piece of shit. I say they take Newton with the number one.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Benlen wrote: Papa Voo wrote: Okay, this looks to be the year of many teams needing starting QBs, but there may not be any true franchise QBs in this draft class, except for maybe a hidden gem like Tom Brady from many years ago. 

Let's get the first question out there.....if you are the Carolina Panthers, do you take Cam Newton with the No. 1 overall pick? 

Panthers are shitty at almost all positions. They might as well try to improve at the QB position. Jimmy Clausen is a piece of shit. I say they take Newton with the number one.

I think it boils down to if Newton is a franchise QB.  If he is not thought of in that respect, then I go defense and get a stud who is not as risky as Newton.

CanadianHorseman



Joined: Fri Nov 2nd, 2007
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia Canada
Posts: 14026
Status: 
Offline
I wouldn't be surprised to see Dallas trade down from # 9 and pick up an extra 2nd and/or 3rd round pick. Most figure that the Cowboys will finally start rebuilding their O-line and that the best 2 OL prospects ( Tyron Smith from USC and Anthony Castonzo ) will be available later on in the 1st round. I also would not be surprised to see Dallas try to add another 1st round pick and select CB Prince Amukamara from Arkansas.

I posted this in another thread but here's a chart from Pro Football Weekly on which round they think each player should get picked.

http://www.profootballweekly.com/2011/04/06/pfws-exclusive-draft-value-chart-4





Last edited on Thu Apr 28th, 2011 11:26 pm by CanadianHorseman

beejmi
The Big Kahuna


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Philly
Posts: 41572
Status: 
Offline
Papa Voo wrote:

Let's get the first question out there.....if you are the Carolina Panthers, do you take Cam Newton with the No. 1 overall pick? 


I don't know if he's the answer and I mean if you are taking someone number one they should be "the answer" (or you should at least believe that) Kind of odd to have the #1 and be in a no-win situation.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
beejmi wrote: Papa Voo wrote:

Let's get the first question out there.....if you are the Carolina Panthers, do you take Cam Newton with the No. 1 overall pick? 


I don't know if he's the answer and I mean if you are taking someone number one they should be "the answer" (or you should at least believe that) Kind of odd to have the #1 and be in a no-win situation.

I think he has better skills than Vince Young, but I am unsure of how well he will adapt to the NFL.   I think the question marks outweigh the positive aspects when associated with the overall No. 1 pick. 

Last edited on Thu Apr 28th, 2011 11:20 pm by Papa Voo

foolio



Joined: Mon Dec 10th, 2007
Location: Jacksonville, Florida USA
Posts: 719
Status: 
Offline
I'm going to be highly disappointed if the Buffalo Bills don't draft Von Miller with the 3rd pick. We need to bolster our pass rush, which Miller will definitely do. Plus, Miller can drop back into coverage when need be.

freebirdsforever2001
Fantasia is running wild!


Joined: Tue Jul 8th, 2008
Location: Pittsgrove, New Jersey USA
Posts: 20758
Status: 
Offline
foolio wrote: I'm going to be highly disappointed if the Buffalo Bills don't draft Von Miller with the 3rd pick. We need to bolster our pass rush, which Miller will definitely do. Plus, Miller can drop back into coverage when need be.

Heard Denver likes Him alot.

Married Jo



Joined: Fri Dec 21st, 2007
Location: Hickory NC
Posts: 6760
Status: 
Offline
The Panthers are going to take Cam Newton and fuck up big time...the only positive with taking him is IMO they will suck again so bad next year, they still could have a shot at getting Luck in the 2012 draft.

BTW, NFL network is showing an interview Deion did with Cam. Two things stand out. One, if the cameras weren't on, I'm fairly certain Primetime would have dropped to his knees and just gave Newton the blowjob of his life. Two, Newton just said one of the dumbest things I've ever heard from an athlete. Talking about Peyton Manning and Brady, he said, and I quote, because I just rewound the DVR to make sure I got exactly what he said:

"Two people they always talk about, as far as preparing for each game, Tom Brady and Peyton Manning, you have to respect them, but one thing that I always look at, and no offense to these guys or those guys is that's not god-given..preparation is not God given.."

No shit dumbass...God given talent has never won a single NFL game, PREPARATION ALWAYS overcomes talent...always...

beejmi
The Big Kahuna


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Philly
Posts: 41572
Status: 
Offline
I wonder if some of these picks get traded next week. Example. Arizona makes deal for Kolb. Arizona drafts whoever Philly wants. Trade announced next week.

brodiescomics



Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 3322
Status: 
Online
Chat room is open if anyone wants to talk shit, football, etc.

http://client11.addonchat.com/sc.php?id=288995

beejmi
The Big Kahuna


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Philly
Posts: 41572
Status: 
Offline
Carolina has been on the clock since week ten last year and I don't think they're sure who to take.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Goodell booed out of the buidling.....great!

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
No. 1 Pick--Cam Newton goes to the Carolina Panthers

 

Strengths:

Newton has a rare blend of height, strength and speed. Fierce competitor and emotional leader. Flashes the ability to zip the ball into tight spots. Has a quick, over-the-top delivery. Puts a ton of revolutions on the ball and can make all the throws. Frequently evades the rush for second-chance opportunities. Threat to pick up large chunks when he tucks.

 

Weaknesses:

Not proficient at going through his progressions or making NFL reads. Doesn't anticipate receivers getting open, must see them in a window. Inconsistent accuracy due to poor footwork and falling away to avoid a big hit. Despite athleticism, needs to improve his drop mechanics and the finer points of pocket mobility. Numerous off the field issues worth investigating.

Last edited on Fri Apr 29th, 2011 01:23 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Who would you compare Newton to in regards to any other past QBs?

 

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Denver on the clock.

 

De-Fense!!

Last edited on Fri Apr 29th, 2011 01:14 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Denver makes Von Miller their selection. 

Miller is a OLB out of Texas A&M.

 

Miller's role in the A&M defense over the past three years has been fairly simple: get after the quarterback on almost every play. The 2010 Butkus Award winner as the nation's best linebacker has been a thorn in the side of passers and offensive linemen since he arrived in College Station.

 

 

Last edited on Fri Apr 29th, 2011 01:23 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Buffalo takes Marcell Dareus, NT, Alabama with the No. 3 Pick overall.



Pass rush: Good initial quickness off the snap. Doesn't possess the burst upfield to cross the tackle's face and turn the corner. Quick enough, however, to split the gap and collapse the pocket from the interior. Explosive hands to disengage from blocks. Needs a clear lane to close, but shows a late burst toward the ball when he has it. Flashes some legitimate pass-rush technique, including a swim move and good inside rip. Possesses surprising lateral agility and balance to track down elusive quarterbacks.


Run defense: Stout at the point of attack. Plays with good leverage and can anchor to create a pile. Cognizant defender who works hard to keep containment. Good lateral agility and balance to slide while fighting blockers. Long arms and good strength to lock-out. Explosive hands to disengage. Won't shed the block until he reads where the ballcarrier is going. Good effort laterally and downfield in pursuit. Surprising speed for a man his size.


Explosion: Can provide an explosive initial punch to jar the offensive lineman back onto his heels. Powerful and quick hands to shed blocks. Flashes some explosiveness as a hitter, needing little momentum to rock the ballcarrier.


Strength: Thick lower body, which helps him anchor well against the run. Powerful bull rusher with good hand strength to disengage quickly. Good upper-body strength to pull down ballcarriers while occupied with a blocker.
Tackling: Shows surprising lateral agility and balance to break down against elusive athletes. Isn't always capable of making the tackle in the open field himself, but often does a good enough job of forcing elusive ballcarriers to dance in an effort to elude him that secondary defenders are able to get there and help make the play. Good strength for the pull down tackle inside. Good effort laterally and downfield in pursuit. Will lay out for the diving tackle, showing good hand-eye coordination to trip up the ballcarrier. Flashes some explosiveness as a hitter.


Intangibles: Suspended by the NCAA for the first two games of the 2010 season when it was discovered that he'd accepted inappropriate benefits from an agent. Endured a troubled childhood. Father died when Dareus was six, leaving mother to support six children. Dareus has lived with others throughout much of his life, including an assistant coach in high school and a sponsor family while in college.

I like this pick for Buffalo.  They stayed away from this below-average group of QBs.

Last edited on Fri Apr 29th, 2011 02:00 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
The Bungals take A.J. Green, WR, Georgia

 



Release: Quick, active hands to slap away defenders attempts at press coverage. Good lateral agility and impressive acceleration to elude and gain an early advantage. Hits top speed quickly and shows rare balance and explosiveness to gain separation against shorter, quicker defenders.


Hands: Unquestionably his best attribute. Long arms, big, soft hands and excellent body control to contort and make the highlight-reel catch, including seemingly impossible one-handed grabs. Rarely allows the ball into his pads, snatching the ball out of the air and securing it quickly when he is anticipating taking a bit hit. Has proven the ability to absorb a pop and maintain control.


Route running: An underrated element of his game and a reason why Green appears better suited than most rookies to make an immediate impact in the NFL. Doesn't rely on his size and speed to generate separation from cornerbacks, though he's a terrific jump-ball threat and has the straight-line speed to work the deep part of the field in the NFL. Possesses surprising balance and burst out of his breaks considering his size. Plants his foot and can explode on the slant route, shielding defenders from the ball. Good hesitation and acceleration for double-move routes.


After the catch: Possesses good vision and the lateral agility to cutback against the grain, though his long legs limit his shiftiness. Accelerates quickly and has the straight-line speed to ruin pursuit angles. Surprisingly strong runner. Fights through arm tackles.


Blocking: Looks to help out his teammates by securing blocks downfield, but has only marginal strength and physicality in this area.


Intangibles: Suspended for the first four games of the 2010 season for selling a jersey to an agent. Recipient of Neel Family Football Scholarship. Member of the Summer 2009 Honor Roll. Respected by teammates and coaching staff. Voted Team MVP following the 2010 season.

 

The Bengals made a good selection here.  They need to clear out the trash they had at the WR position.  Palmer may now want to come back and play in Cincinnati. 

 

Arizona is on the clock.

Last edited on Fri Apr 29th, 2011 02:06 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Does Arizona take Patrick Peterson or could we be ready for a trade?

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Arizona takes Patrick Peterson, CB, LSU,  with the No. 5 pick. 

 



Read & React: Possesses good instincts for the position. Reads his man and will sneak a peek at the quarterback, showing the anticipation necessary to make the big play. Can get over-aggressive and bite on double-moves, though he shows good straight-line speed to recover and possesses excellent ball skills. Could come up more aggressively when he reads run, as he's content with allowing teammates to make the tackle, but isn't afraid to come up in run support when he has to.


Man Coverage: Rare fluidity and straight-line speed for a defender of his size. Quick feet and balance when backpedaling and when he switches to a side shuffle technique. Rarely uses his hands to jam the receiver, opting instead simply to turn and run with his opponent. Will occasionally misjudge the speed of his opponent when in off-man coverage, allowing the receiver to eat up too much of the cushion. Easily flips his hips and shows very good burst out of his breaks (especially considering his size) to mirror the receiver. Good acceleration and has a burst to close. Good route-recognition. Good body lean and use of the sideline to ride wideouts out of bounds. Excellent size, overall physicality and competitiveness for jump-ball situations. Times his leaps well and can high-point the ball due to excellent hand-eye coordination.


Zone Coverage: Good recognition for zone coverage, but will drift out of position when he's reading the eyes of quarterbacks, resulting in some big-play interceptions, but also in allowing receptions when savvy passers bait him. Quick feet and balance to change directions. Good route anticipation. Switches off his target quickly when he sees the quarterback throwing elsewhere. Closes on the ball quickly.


Closing/Recovery: Some concern over what his time in the 40-yard dash will be, but shows very good field speed and possesses a second gear of acceleration to close on the ball. Locates the ball quickly and has the long arms to break up passes (or even make the interception) when it appears that he is beaten. Has good, but not elite burst to break downhill out of his cuts, making him susceptible to comeback routes against bigger receivers who challenge him vertically (see Alabama, Texas A&M). Among best attributes is his size, leaping ability and ball skills on fade and go-routes against bigger receivers. Matches up well in jump-ball situations. Isn't afraid to get physical in these confrontations, but because he's going for the ball, doesn't draw the flag. Very good ball skills. Times his leap well, showing a good vertical and possesses the long arms and soft, strong hands to pluck the ball out of the air. Excellent return skills once he has the ball in his hands.


Run Support: When not in press coverage, reads run quickly and either provides the contain to push the runner back inside or makes the tackle himself. Focuses on his primary target - the receiver - when he's in press coverage and can be a step slower to recognize run. Trusts his teammates to make the play, showing good strength and toughness to fight through blocks, but not always the sense of urgency scouts would prefer. Good effort in pursuit. Takes good angles to the ball and has the speed to run down the ballcarrier.


Tackling: Reliable open-field tackler. Breaks down well in space to make the stop against elusive athletes. Willing to take on the bigger ballcarrier and does a nice of wrapping his arms securely around the legs to make the effective stop. Good effort in pursuit. Not an explosive hitter, but plays his size, strength and long arms help him knock down ballcarriers quickly.


Intangibles: Confident, almost cocky demeanor on the field. Possesses the short memory of all great cornerbacks. Extremely competitive. Seems to relish the battles against top receivers in man coverage. Campaigned to be used on special teams and even offense while at LSU due to his natural playmaking skills. Good bloodlines. Cousins of NFL cornerback Bryant McFadden and wide receivers Santana and Sinorice Moss. Characterized as "freak" athlete.

 

Arizona made a great selection even though this was not considered a "need."

 

Uh-oh, here comes the Cleveland Brownies!

Last edited on Fri Apr 29th, 2011 02:07 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Teams needing QBs are not being teased into taking a QB from this year's mediocre group.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Cleveland trades No. 6 pick to Atlanta.  It is believed that the Falcons want Julio Jones, but Gruden is laying the smack down on Jones.  Could it be a reach?  Some of have compared him to former Detroit WR Charlie Rogers.

Benlen



Joined: Sun Oct 21st, 2007
Location: Milpitas, California USA
Posts: 13280
Status: 
Offline
Papa Voo wrote: Cleveland trades No. 6 pick to Atlanta.  It is believed that the Falcons want Julio Jones, but Gruden is laying the smack down on Jones.  Could it be a reach?  Some of have compared him to former Detroit WR Charlie Rogers.
falcons gave up way too much to move up 21 spots

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Atlanta takes Julio Jones, WR, Alabama

Ryan gets his big-time WR.

Release: Good initial burst off the line of scrimmage. Long-strider with good build-up speed to eat up the cushion against corners playing off-man coverage. Excellent size and strength to defeat press coverage. Good use of hands to ward off defenders and has enough lateral agility and burst off the line to gain an immediate advantage.
Hands: Inconsistent. Drops too many passes due to a lack of concentration - usually when he's trying to make a defender miss before wrapping the ball up securely. Isn't a consistent "hands" catcher and allows too many passes into his pads, resulting in drops. Flashes the ability to extend and make the highlight-reel reception. Willing to run routes across the middle and take a big hit to make the catch.


Route running: Made his biggest gains in this area as a junior. Improved consistency with his route-running. Doesn't possess elite speed or the explosion out of his cuts, but has learned to sink his hips and plant firmly to generate improved separation on short and intermediate routes. Is able to get away with less than ideal route-running due to his size and physicality. Much stronger than most collegiate receivers and won't be pushed around by NFL defensive backs. Deceptive deep speed to challenge over the top.


After the catch: Among his better areas. Runs with a long stride but also possesses good agility to elude defenders in open quarters and the acceleration to run away from defenders. Rare strength to break free of tackles and gain yardage after the catch. Good vision to set up his blocks downfield due to experience as kick and punt returner.


Blocking: Among the better downfield blockers of the 2011 receiver class. Good size, strength and competitiveness. Keeps his head on a swivel and looks to help his teammates.


Intangibles: Proved his toughness by playing through various injuries over his career, including a broken hand in 2010. Highly decorated prep athlete rated the No. 1 overall prospect in the country by some scouting organizations. Involved with several local community service projects including the Santa America Foundation and local Optimist International club.


Compares to: David Boston, ex-Cardinals, Chargers -- Jones has enough deep speed to make plays downfield with the size, intensity and strength to overwhelm defensive backs as a run-blocker and possession receiver.

 

San Fran up.

Last edited on Fri Apr 29th, 2011 02:08 am by Papa Voo

Benlen



Joined: Sun Oct 21st, 2007
Location: Milpitas, California USA
Posts: 13280
Status: 
Offline
Hope Niners move down but they might take Fairley

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Benlen wrote: Papa Voo wrote: Cleveland trades No. 6 pick to Atlanta.  It is believed that the Falcons want Julio Jones, but Gruden is laying the smack down on Jones.  Could it be a reach?  Some of have compared him to former Detroit WR Charlie Rogers.
falcons gave up way too much to move up 21 spots

They get Atlanta's first round pick this year and the following for next year:

  • Browns trade the No. 6 pick to the Falcons for first- and fourth-round picks in 2012 draft.

Benlen



Joined: Sun Oct 21st, 2007
Location: Milpitas, California USA
Posts: 13280
Status: 
Offline
Alton Smith

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Julio Jones has a lot of question marks surrounding him. I would have pulled the trigger for a trade for A.J. Green but not Jones.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Aldon Smith, DE, Missouri goes to San Francisco

 



Pass rush: Great length and upper-body development with room to grow and become a top-notch pass rusher. When given the green light to attack the passer, he is able to turn the corner or quickly go outside-in to get a more direct path to the QB. Uses strength to get movement in his bull rush; able to release with his hands to harass a scrambling passer. Moves inside to a three-technique spot on some plays to take advantage of his quickness, as well as his height, to disrupt passing lanes (seven pass breakups in 2009-2010). Jumps over and uses his hands to beat cut blocks.


Run defense: Potentially strong edge run defender as 4-3 end or 3-4 linebacker. Stays balanced out of his stance, extends his arms to keep distance, able to shed to get to the ball on either side of the block. Good backfield awareness. Willing to lower his shoulder and stand his ground against pulling guards and moving tight ends. Gets down the line while engaged to be involved on inside runs. Beats reach blocks to get into the backfield.


Explosion: Still more potential than practice as a pure outside pass rusher, but shows glimpses of explosive ability on the edge. Pops his man with big swipes to get past blockers. Brings a punch in his bull rush, sometimes knocking back even strong college tackles.


Strength: Plays stronger than his height/weight numbers indicate. Does not give up room when holding the line. Violent with his hands, able to push aside blockers when rushing the passer or shedding to chase ballcarriers. Still requires time in pro strength and conditioning to gain 15-20 pounds before becoming a three-down player as a 4-3 defensive end.


Tackling: Uses his long, strong arms to wrap up quarterbacks and ballcarriers in the backfield; can chop down hard to force fumbles. Speedy chase tackler who closes well for his size due to that length, hustle, and straight-line speed. Misses tackles when leaving his feet early or short-arming (ducking his head and not fully extending.)
Intangibles: Right fibula fractured against San Diego State in October 2010; fracture

was high enough above ankle and below the knee so it could heal on its own without surgery. Returned just three weeks later and played hurt for the rest of the season. Only a redshirt sophomore, which is a positive given his upside, but some might view as negative given his relative lack of experience.


Compares to: Jarvis Moss, Raiders -- Scouts figured Moss' length and speed off the edge would be difficult for offensive tackles to handle, and despite his uneven career to date, will value Smith's similar build because of the importance of pass rushers.

Last edited on Fri Apr 29th, 2011 02:06 am by Papa Voo

LAF



Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location:  
Posts: 4596
Status: 
Offline
LOL @ Jake Locker going #8

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Surpise!  Surprise!

Jake Locker, QB, Washington, goes to Mike Munchak and the Tennessee Oilers.

 

Accuracy: Showed significant improvement in 2009, though still a work in progress in this area. Has to do a better job of setting his feet before making the throw. Too often forces receivers on short and intermediate routes to slow or reach wide to collect his throws. Flashes surprising touch down the seam and in hitting the back on swing passes, though he needs to gain consistency here. Proved most accurate in critical situations, drilling a variety of pro-style throws (comebacks, crossing routes and deep-outs) when Washington faced some of its best competition or in situations with the game on the line.


Arm Strength: Possesses ideal arm strength. Drives the ball on short and intermediate routes. In fact, may need to learn to more consistently throw with touch for shorter routes, as he too often zips passes through his targets' hands. Can stretch the defense deep and throw 60-plus yards with a tight trajectory. Experienced playing in poor weather and has the arm strength to slice through strong winds. Reportedly has been clocked at 95 mph by baseball scouts.
Setup/Release: Well versed taking the snap from under center and out of the shotgun. Good foot speed, balance and agility for the quarterback position, but is still developing the nuances of setting his feet before releasing the pass. Has an efficient, over-the-top delivery and delivers the ball with velocity.
Reading Defenses: May have regressed as a senior in this area after improving significantly from his sophomore season (under Tyrone Willingham) to his junior season (first under Sarkisian). Has a tendency to stare down his primary option. Can be too aggressive and will throw the deep ball into double-coverage.


On the Move: A true dual-threat quarterback. Has 4.5 speed, but plays faster due to his vision, and his long strides in the open field are deceptive. Has some wiggle to make defenders miss and seems to enjoy the physical aspect of the game. Had to be reined back by Sarkisian (and previously, Willingham) for his willingness to drop his shoulder and take on the defender for additional yardage. Dangerous thrower on the move, demonstrating good velocity and improving accuracy when rolling to his right or left. Has a tendency to forget his mechanics when throwing on the move, however, leading to some of his passes drifting high or wide of his intended target.


Intangibles: In addition to his durability and consistency concerns, scouts also have to worry if Locker will remain in football. He's a dual sport athlete who has twice been drafted by MLB's Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. Signed a six-year deal with the Angels in 2009, though part of the agreement is that Locker will pursue a career in football over baseball. Technically considered a walk-on at UW as the Angels are paying for his scholarship costs. Highly respected by the coaching staff, teammates and fans. Gutty, determined. Named a team captain in 2009 and 2010. Honored with the Guy Flaherty Most Inspirational Award, the UW's oldest and most prestigious team honor, following the 2009 season.


Compares to: Donovan McNabb, Redskins -- He has an ideal combination of athleticism, arm strength and intangibles, and Locker, like McNabb, can make the highlight reel play despite being only a moderately accurate passer.

 

 

Not a bad pick, but I think they could have probably traded down and got him later.

Classic roll-out style QB.  They need some stability down there in Tennessee.

 

Here comes Jerry and the Boys.

Last edited on Fri Apr 29th, 2011 02:00 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
LAF wrote: LOL @ Jake Locker going #8
Be thankful that Buffalo did not jump into that party.

Benlen



Joined: Sun Oct 21st, 2007
Location: Milpitas, California USA
Posts: 13280
Status: 
Offline
LAF wrote: LOL @ Jake Locker going #8
Third rounder. Denver screwed up.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
With the No. 9 pick overall, dem Dallas Cowboys select Tyron Smith, USC, OT

 

 
Pass blocking: His best trait. Flashes very good initial quickness and gains good depth with his initial kick-slide. Plays on the balls of his feet with good forward and lateral balance. Shuffles his feet laterally to mirror the defender. Has the long arms and strong hands to lock onto the defender. Loses focus and relies too much on his agility to remain in front of the pass rusher. Becomes susceptible to swim moves when he doesn't use his hands aggressively. Has the agility to handle converting to the left side.
 
Run blocking: Good positional blocker. Quick off the snap and can catch and turn his opponent away from the play. Does a nice job of walling off his target, but needs to get stronger and keep his feet churning to drive his opponent out. Too often gets stood up by defenders, creating a pile that the ballcarrier must run around, rather than clearing a hole for the play to run through. Isn't afraid of contact and can drive the defender off the ball in short-yardage situations with his initial push, but isn't yet strong enough to finish blocks consistently.
 
Pulling/trapping: Good mobility to pull and lead the toss-sweep. Good balance and straight-line speed getting to the second level. Struggles to hit the brakes and re-direct and allows his arms to flail at the defender, which could draw holding calls at the next level.
 
Initial Quickness: Inconsistent with his initial get-off. Capable of being the first off the snap, as he often is when he anticipates a blitz to his side or has to get out in front of a sweep play, but can also be among the last off the snap.
 
Downfield: Good athleticism and effort to make downfield blocks. Looks for someone to hit and will peel back if necessary to pop a defender giving chase. Good overall athleticism, but struggles changing direction and therefore must do a better job anticipating where the defender is going to be, rather than allowing him to rush past.
 

Intangibles: Only three years removed from high school. Occasionally moved to left tackle during games, but all 24 of his career starts were at right tackle. Missed the Boston College game in 2009 due to an academic suspension. Missed the 2010 Notre Dame game with a sprained knee. Played on special teams, blocking two kicks in 2010 (Washington State, Arizona State). Not yet a finished product. Turned 20 on Dec. 12.

 

Redskins on the clock

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Good pick for the Cowboys, but they will need to find out where to play him.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Redskins......What in the hell do they pick?

brodiescomics



Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 3322
Status: 
Online
Happy with the Cowboys going O-Line. My guess is Colombo is gone.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Redskins trade pick to Jacksonville.  Redskins need help all over...it does not matter to them.

 

Jacksonville Jaguars select QB, Blaine Gabbert

Accuracy: Regularly shows the ability to place the ball on his target's numbers, though most of his best throws came within 10 yards of the line of scrimmage because of the Missouri spread offense. Throws darts to either side of the field on short timing routes and passes between the hashes. Gives his receivers a chance to make a play after the catch on crossing routes, leading them perfectly when he's comfortable in the pocket. Inconsistent throwing outside the hashes, however, making some fantastic throws on out routes and sailing many others above the head of open receivers or coming up short on touch throws over the top. Also inconsistent on short throws when under pressure.
 
Arm Strength: Has a solid NFL arm and throws a tight spiral, giving him the capability to stretch the field horizontally and vertically. Threads the ball between the corner and safety against cover-two and needles the ball through tight windows over the middle. Flashes nice touch on seam throws to the tight end. Needs to throttle down a bit more consistently; will overthrow passes in close proximity and sail sideline patterns.
 
Setup/Release: Looks the part of a pocket passer, standing tall in the pocket. Usually has a quick release, almost whipping the ball out. Winds up and double-clutches on occasion, but still releases the ball quickly. Completes downfield passes with traffic around him, but will short-arm throws and panic with pressure coming straight at him. Generally balanced, sometimes throwing from his back foot. Pats the ball to keep rhythm on long throws. Does not feel backside pressure well. Can get happy feet against a strong defense, though he will re-set his feet and deliver at times. Almost always in the shotgun formation, must master the traditional snap from center. When not taking one step back and firing a short throw, gets a bit long with his final drop step making it difficult to transition back forward and leaving him susceptible to pass rush.
 
Reading Defenses: Will take time to transition to the NFL because he runs the typical spread offense. Only reads one receiver on many plays, or even half of one side of the field. Stares down receivers and defenders read him easily. Does not look for secondary receivers, tends to take off instead. Fails to see blitzes coming consistently, even when they aren't disguised.
 
On the Move: Nice athlete for a quarterback his size, makes plays outside the pocket and able to pick up more than a first down on the run. Shows some elusiveness in the pocket, but chooses to run outside rather than step up to find a receiver. Falls forward for first downs, but must learn how to push the pile on sneaks. Willing to throw the ball away if nothing is available. Good mobility outside the pocket, but gets inconsistent in his accuracy and makes some poor decisions because he gets impatient. Is not overly elusive, will not escape NFL pockets and tackles as easily as he is able to do in college. Needs to learn how to slide.
 
Intangibles: Respected leader in the locker room. Has the confidence to win over the huddle. Willing to put in the time in the film room to master the offense. Very competitive, gives full effort on the field.
 

Compares to: Sam Bradford, Rams -- Finding an appropriate comparison for Gabbert is difficult, as his arm and mobility outclasses former No. 1 picks Alex Smith and Eli Manning. Not as accurate or productive as Bradford, it is intriguing to consider what Gabbert's stats would have been on those 2007-08 Oklahoma squads.

 

David Garrard days are over....let's see if likes playing with a QB in waiting to take over.

Decent pick for the Jaguars....Garrard was way overrated.

CanadianHorseman



Joined: Fri Nov 2nd, 2007
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia Canada
Posts: 14026
Status: 
Offline
Papa Voo wrote: Good pick for the Cowboys, but they will need to find out where to play him.
He'll play on the left side so Doug Free can move over to the right. Not a glamorous pick by any means but still a good solid pick by Dallas. It would have been nice if they could have traded down a few picks and still been able to pick Smith while adding another 2nd round pick. Now if Dallas can get UCLA Safety Rahim Moore at # 38 then I'll be very happy.

brodiescomics



Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 3322
Status: 
Online
Texans take J.J. Watt. Willams and Watt. Nasty.

brodiescomics



Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 3322
Status: 
Online
CanadianHorseman wrote: Papa Voo wrote: Good pick for the Cowboys, but they will need to find out where to play him.
He'll play on the left side so Doug Free can move over to the right. Not a glamorous pick by any means but still a good solid pick by Dallas. It would have been nice if they could have traded down a few picks and still been able to pick Smith while adding another 2nd round pick. Now if Dallas can get UCLA Safety Rahim Moore at # 38 then I'll be very happy.

Looks like they were looking for a trade, but couldn't pull the trigger.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Houston is up next with the 11th pick, and I did not know they had Wade Phillips as their new D-coordinator.  Where hasn't this guy been a defensive coordinator?  Pittsburgh?

 

Houston takes J.J. Watt, DE, Wisconsin

 

 
Pass rush: Relentless rushing the passer in obvious passing situations whether lined up inside or outside. Gets extra attention from opponents. Most dangerous when anticipating the snap and swimming over guards/centers inside. Spins off blocks to get outside after initial contact or pushes through doubles inside. Gets his hands into throwing lanes, using his height and length to knock down or affect passes. Nimble feet allow him to twist inside. Bounces back after initial contact, keeps his balance to find the ballcarrier. Knocks tight end off route before making his rush. Often lined up outside the tackle, can bull-rush and get corner at times against college right tackles but needs to continue improving his flexibility to beat NFL blockers.
 
Run defense: Active against the run. Able to stack and shed to get to outside runs, and is strong and agile enough to move down the line to be involved in inside runs. Displays some nice change-of-direction ability for his size to mirror ballcarriers trying to elude. Gives very good effort containing misdirection and bootlegs on the edge, though quicker NFL ballcarriers will beat him to the edge. When inside, has quickness to penetrate and gets his hands up quickly to maintain distance from the blocker but fails to keep his body square to the line and gets pushed out of the play.
 
Explosion: Flashes quickness off the snap and willingness to pop and knock back opponents. Able to penetrate gaps with a nice first step and works through double-teams with aggressiveness when lined up inside. Has enough closing speed to explode into ballcarriers and force fumbles. Doesn't have the typical explosive first step of most rush ends because of his girth and lack of ideal height. He is considered an explosive player on every down because he has arguably the strongest punch and most effective hands in the class.
 
Strength: Flashes strength to shed blocks and bull through double teams, but must gain muscle in both his upper and lower body to hold his ground at the next level. Can be pushed off the line by double teams, typically when turned sideways. Works with his hands against blockers, looks to potentially be good in this area. Can play too high when lined up inside to win the leverage battle.
 
Tackling: High-effort tackler with long arms and growing strength. Gets low despite his height to mirror and wrap up ballcarriers. Quarterbacks do not want to feel his explosive tackling in the backfield. Doesn't leave his feet, though he stretches to make a lot of ankle tackles other linemen couldn't make.
 
Intangibles: Excellent character and work ethic. Won the Lott IMPACT Award for integrity, maturity, performance, academics, community and tenacity among college defenders. Began the Justin J. Watt Foundation to help schools fund athletic programs, does quite a bit of community work. Academic All-Big Ten in 2009 and 2010. Brother Derek is scheduled to play football at UW in 2011.
 

Compares to: Adam Carriker, Redskins -- People were impressed with Watt's combine performance, but scouts saw very similar results from Carriker four years ago. Carriker seemed to fit Washington's 3-4 scheme well in 2010, so Watt's career might get off on the right foot if he can find a similar situation.

 

Minnesota is up next at the 12th position. Maybe they will announce Favre is coming back, AGAIN!

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Whatever happened with the Okoye guy that the Texans drafted in the first round severla years ago?  He was supposedly a raw, can't miss talent. 

brodiescomics



Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 3322
Status: 
Online
Still with the Texans. He is a DT which is not a very glamorous position. He basically eats blockers to let Cushing kill people.

LAF



Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location:  
Posts: 4596
Status: 
Offline
LOL @ Christian Ponder

The Bills may get Luck next year by default with these horrible 1st round selections this year

foolio



Joined: Mon Dec 10th, 2007
Location: Jacksonville, Florida USA
Posts: 719
Status: 
Offline
I wanted Ponder for the Bills, but I figured he'd be available with the 34th pick in the 2nd round.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
First big surprise and possible REACH

 

The Minnesota Vikings take Chsitian Ponder, QB, Florida St.

 
Accuracy: Zips the underneath routes with good accuracy; consistently hitting receivers in stride to best take advantage of teammates' athleticism in FSU's use of quick slants and screens. Keeps his deep-outs low and outside, away from the defender and where only his intended target can make the play. Occasionally forces the receiver to adjust on deeper passes, as his lack of dominant arm strength can cause the ball to float.
 
Arm Strength: Doesn't own a Matthew Stafford-type howitzer, but has plenty of arm strength to make every NFL throw. Good zip on underneath routes; showcasing enough drive to push the ball through tight windows for the quick slant. Good timing and accuracy make up for a lack of a dominant arm for the deep-out. Effective deep-ball thrower; able to launch the ball 50-plus yards with velocity and trajectory.
 
Setup/Release: Quick setup and a compact, over-the-top delivery. Good footwork. Willing to take a hit to set his feet and step into his throw. Experienced under center and operating out of the shotgun. Passes have a tight spiral, making his throws easy for his wideouts to track and catch easily.
 
Reading Defenses: Some legitimate concerns in this area. Has to do a better job of looking off the defender, as he has a tendency to stare-down his primary target. Doesn't always feel the pressure coming when he makes his progressions, especially if his primary target is unexpectedly covered up. Made some critical mistakes late in games throughout his career, including several times in 2010.
O
n the Move: Mobile quarterback with the vision, agility and straight-line speed to escape the pocket and scramble for positive yardage. Can be too aggressive and leave himself vulnerable to absorbing big hits by electing not to slide. Has a good sense in the pocket. Willing to step up into the pocket or scramble wide, allowing defenders to rush by as he keeps his eyes downfield. Good body control to throw on the move, making him an effective dual threat out of the bootleg. Squares his shoulder and has plenty of arm-strength to drive the ball into mid-range openings in the defense. Can freeze the defender with an effective pump-fake. Knows where the first down marker is and fights hard for the required yardage, showing determination and better than expected leg-drive. Not afraid to get his jersey dirty as a runner or even as a blocker/tackler.
 
Intangibles: Carries himself like an NFL quarterback. Highly respected team captain who takes his role as a leader seriously. Comfortable leading vocally or by setting the example on and off the field. Earned his Master's Degree in finance and is working on his doctorate. Durability concern. Missed the final three games of the 2009 season with a grade-3 separation of his throwing shoulder and suffered more injuries to this throwing arm (including undergoing two surgeries on his elbow) in 2010. Father, David, played linebacker at Florida State from 1980-83.
 

Compares to: Tony Romo, Cowboys -- Like Romo (undrafted), Ponder's lack of ideal size and struggles with durability are enough to push him down the board. But his arm strength, accuracy, mobility and intelligence could make him a very effective pro quarterback if he can improve in critical situations.

 

From Favre to Ponder!

What made them pull the trigger that early, maybe nobody would trade with them.

 

Detroit....next!

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
foolio wrote: I wanted Ponder for the Bills, but I figured he'd be available with the 34th pick in the 2nd round.

I agree....this was a little early.

brodiescomics



Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 3322
Status: 
Online
Lions need O-Line.

LAF



Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location:  
Posts: 4596
Status: 
Offline
The Lions seem to have switched from draft a WR every year to draft a DT every year

brodiescomics



Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 3322
Status: 
Online
Wow. The Lions D-Line is officially SICK! Too bad Stafford will probably be dead by Week 6.

Last edited on Fri Apr 29th, 2011 02:24 am by brodiescomics

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
With the 13th pick, the Detroit Lions select DT Nick Fairley, Auburn

 
Pass rush: Explosive initial burst off the snap. Good flexibility and balance to "get skinny" and penetrate gaps. Uses his hands well to slap away blockers' attempts to get their hands on him. Possesses a rare combination of long arms and quick feet, helping him avoid cut blocks. Good swim move. Locates the ball quickly and has the lateral agility to redirect. Good short-area closing burst. Good effort in pursuit. Surprising speed for a man of his size.
 
Run defense: Relies on his quickness to penetrate gaps and make plays behind the line of scrimmage more than his strength to hold up at the point of attack. Long, relatively thin limbed for the position and can be knocked off the ball due to his lack of an ideal anchor. Good flexibility to twist through double-teams. Locates the ball quickly and pursues well laterally.
 
Explosion: Quick burst to penetrate gaps. Can shock his opponent with his quickness, strong initial punch and quick hands to disengage. Has an explosive burst to close when he sees a playmaking opportunity and can make the eye-popping collision without needing much space to gather momentum.
 
Strength: Good, but not elite strength, especially in his lower body. Has a tendency to come up at the snap and can be pushed back because of it. Possesses very good natural strength, however, including in his core as he can twist through double teams. Very good hand strength to rip through blocks. Good strength for the pull-down and trip-up tackle.
 
Tackling: Possesses a good closing burst and brings his hips to supply the big hit. Good strength for the drag tackle. Willing to lay out and has good hand-eye coordination to trip up the ballcarrier running away from him.
 

Intangibles: Former high school basketball player who shows surprisingly quick feet. An ascending talent, but is nonetheless labeled as a player with some true bust potential, as there are concerns about his work ethic. Carries a little bit of extra weight around his middle and is more "country" strong than weight-room defined. Has developed a reputation as a dirty player; repeatedly flagged in 2010 for late hits and there have been instances when he has speared ballcarriers with his helmet, banged into their lower legs purposely and pushed off downed players to lift himself up. One of nine siblings.

 

How about them Lions!!  They may string two good drafts in a row!!!

 

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
brodiescomics wrote: Wow. The Lions D-Line is officially SICK! Too bad Stafford will probably be dead by Week 6.

Yep.  At least there is some consistency and vision in what this coach wants to do.  Defense!  Defense!  Defense!  They do need to strengthen those corners, though.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
DE Robert Quinn, North Carolina, goes to St. Louis at the 14th pick.

 

Pass rush: Inconsistent off the snap. Is often among the last linemen off the ball, though he has such an explosive burst he can still beat the tackle with speed even when late and can leave his opponent grasping at air when he anticipates the snap correctly. Possesses a rare combination of burst and flexibility to dip under the reach of the tackle. Good agility and balance to turn the corner and has very good closing speed. Possesses a good rip move and the footwork to jab-step outside and cut back inside to split the gap; otherwise shows surprisingly little technique.
 
Run defense: Too light to hold up at the point of attack on rushing plays designed to go directly at him. Possesses good upper-body strength and explosive hands to shed blocks, but can be engulfed and driven off the ball. Doesn't do a good enough job keeping contain, too often slicing inside and losing his gap integrity when he incorrectly judges the speed of the ballcarrier. Good lateral agility, flexibility and balance to change direction and pursue. Good straight-line speed and effort to pursue.
 
Explosion: Perhaps his best asset. Can explode off the snap and fly by offensive tackles. Opponents have to gameplan around his burst off the edge. Good use of hands to pop the offensive lineman and shed the block. Arrives with a bang as a tackler. Forced eight fumbles in only two seasons.
 
Strength: Improving in this area and has the frame to handle an additional 10-15 pounds of muscle without a significant loss in quickness or speed. Good, not great strength at the point of attack. Lacks the sand in his pants to hold up against the run, though he does wrench himself free when he has space to operate. Good strength to drag down the ballcarrier.
 
Tackling: Good lateral agility and balance to break down in space and make the open-field tackle. Generally wraps up, though he'll go for the strip and miss tackles. Only average instincts but gets to the football quickly when he locates it.
 

Intangibles: Fluid athlete who appears capable of handling the transition to outside linebacker in a 3-4 scheme. Was occasionally asked to drop into coverage while at UNC. Despite his 2010 suspension, those close to the UNC program describe Quinn as a quality person and teammate and are endorsing him to NFL teams. Had his senior season at Ft. Dorchester High School shortened due to brain surgery to remove a benign tumor. Was originally told that the tumor and resulting surgery could end his football career. Has had no known complications following the surgery. Didn't start his first career game but did start the other 25 in his two seasons.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Please Miami do not take Mike Pouncey!!!

LAF



Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location:  
Posts: 4596
Status: 
Offline
Papa Voo wrote: Please Miami do not take Mike Pouncey!!!

They do.

I guess as a guard, because I remember him sucking really bad at Center this past year for Florida. Nearly pissed away a couple games early in the year with bad snaps.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Dammit!

The Miami Dolphins take OG Mike Pouncey, Florida


Pass blocking: Provides a quick initial punch before easing out of his stance. Good balance and lateral agility to mirror the defender. Strong, active hands and long arms allow him to keep his opponent controlled. Can get a little high with his pad level, but shows impressive flexibility and core strength in being able to anchor against a quality bull rush. Struggled early in the year snapping the ball with accuracy out of the shotgun and getting his hands up quickly in pass protection. Has the agility to move back outside to guard.


Run blocking: Quick off the snap. Latches on, shows very good upper-body strength and lateral agility and can turn the defender away from the ballcarrier. Plays with good pad level and shows some nastiness in his game. Looks to drive his assignment downfield or into the turf.


Pulling/trapping: Good initial quickness out of his stance when pulling. Keeps a tight line around linemates, showing good balance and foot speed to get around the edge. Has light feet for a big man and can locate and get to his target in the open field. Effort isn't always consistent sustaining blocks at the second level. Effective trap blocker. Good initial quickness to turn and seal off the defender.


Initial Quickness: Efficient and athletic out of his stance, quickly gaining the advantage over his opponent. Typically gets in the first punch in pass protection.


Downfield: Has the balance and sure feet to be effective as a downfield blocker, but is a bit inconsistent in his effort. Flashes some nastiness, showing a willingness to make the emphatic block to try and intimidate his opponent.


Intangibles: Nearly identical twin brother Maurkice was Florida's starting center each of the past three seasons and was selected No. 18 overall pick of the 2010 NFL Draft by the Pittsburgh Steelers. Prior to Maurkice leaving Florida early for the NFL, the twins made most of their decisions together. Maurkice wasn't willing to sign with Florida until they offered Mike a scholarship, for example. The twins selected Florida over Florida State, Clemson, Miami (Fla.) and Michigan.





Last edited on Fri Apr 29th, 2011 02:41 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Miami is building a good o-line, but they need some weapons inlcuding a QB.

Washington is up next.  Oh boy!

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
With the 16th pick, the Washington Redskins take Ryan Kerrigan, DE, Purdue

Pass rush: Hustle pass rusher with the size to contribute on either side of the line. Not a threat to turn the corner because he is a bit stiff in the hips, but anticipates the snap well and flashes the occasional burst to pressure tackles up the field. Defeats tight ends on the line and running backs in the backfield with his hands and strength. Capable of putting his blocker on skates to take him back into the pocket. Provides secondary rush, keeps his eyes in the backfield and will chase down quarterbacks if they hang onto the ball too long. Does not have an exceptional closing burst, but his height and length make it difficult to see over or pass around him. Drops into coverage on occasion and hustles to plays but lacks great agility in space. Lacks counter pass-rush moves.

 
Run defense: Intelligent, assignment-sure run defender. Keeps arms extended to stack tackle to contain on the edge, though he could shed more consistently. Works hard to get down the line if the play is run away from him. Recovers quickly from cut blocks using his hands to keep his balance, but will lose the ball in the process. Presses double teams, will not give up on a play. Good overall build and has improved his functional strength. Better tackles can control him off the snap, though he will overpower or shed tight ends on run plays when one-on-one. Lacks speed to keep containment against quicker backs if he takes a step inside.
 
Explosion: Is not a quick-twitch athlete but has enough explosiveness from his stance to challenge strong-side tackles as a pass rusher. Keeps his hips low and delivers a strong punch into his blocker's chest, giving him a strong bull rush and the ability to keep his distance from tackles on the edge.
 
Strength: A taller defensive end, he plays with good leverage on the edge and gets under the pads and moves tackles into the backfield. Moves with blockers on the edge to prevent plays getting outside. Must improve using his hands to consistently disengage from blocks to make plays.
 
Tackling: Secure tackler inside and when chasing downfield. Excellent hustle to track down receivers and running backs downfield on short throws. Long, strong arms make it difficult for ballcarriers to elude his tackles. More of a drag-down tackler than explosive, but brings enough pop to force fumbles when attacking the quarterback. Lacks elite speed and has only adequate change-of-direction agility for his size; he might struggle to corral quick and elusive NFL backs.
 

Intangibles: Team captain and unquestioned leader of the defense. Off-the-charts work ethic on the field and weight room, equally excelling at both. Exceptional student-athlete, has garnered multiple Academic All-Big Ten and All-American honors during his career. Full name is Patrick Ryan Kerrigan. Father played football at Ball State. He had surgery on broken foot after 2009 season, which he also aggravated during spring practices in 2010.

 

Half-way through the First Round

 

The Patsies are up next.

Benlen



Joined: Sun Oct 21st, 2007
Location: Milpitas, California USA
Posts: 13280
Status: 
Offline
Papa Voo wrote: Please Miami do not take Mike Pouncey!!!
hahahahah

Count Grog
Hall Of Famer


Joined: Sun Oct 21st, 2007
Location: Fuquay Varina, NC, USA
Posts: 15603
Status: 
Offline
Papa Voo wrote: First big surprise and possible REACH

 

The Minnesota Vikings take Chsitian Ponder, QB, Florida St.

 
Accuracy: Zips the underneath routes with good accuracy; consistently hitting receivers in stride to best take advantage of teammates' athleticism in FSU's use of quick slants and screens. Keeps his deep-outs low and outside, away from the defender and where only his intended target can make the play. Occasionally forces the receiver to adjust on deeper passes, as his lack of dominant arm strength can cause the ball to float.
 
Arm Strength: Doesn't own a Matthew Stafford-type howitzer, but has plenty of arm strength to make every NFL throw. Good zip on underneath routes; showcasing enough drive to push the ball through tight windows for the quick slant. Good timing and accuracy make up for a lack of a dominant arm for the deep-out. Effective deep-ball thrower; able to launch the ball 50-plus yards with velocity and trajectory.
 
Setup/Release: Quick setup and a compact, over-the-top delivery. Good footwork. Willing to take a hit to set his feet and step into his throw. Experienced under center and operating out of the shotgun. Passes have a tight spiral, making his throws easy for his wideouts to track and catch easily.
 
Reading Defenses: Some legitimate concerns in this area. Has to do a better job of looking off the defender, as he has a tendency to stare-down his primary target. Doesn't always feel the pressure coming when he makes his progressions, especially if his primary target is unexpectedly covered up. Made some critical mistakes late in games throughout his career, including several times in 2010.
O
n the Move: Mobile quarterback with the vision, agility and straight-line speed to escape the pocket and scramble for positive yardage. Can be too aggressive and leave himself vulnerable to absorbing big hits by electing not to slide. Has a good sense in the pocket. Willing to step up into the pocket or scramble wide, allowing defenders to rush by as he keeps his eyes downfield. Good body control to throw on the move, making him an effective dual threat out of the bootleg. Squares his shoulder and has plenty of arm-strength to drive the ball into mid-range openings in the defense. Can freeze the defender with an effective pump-fake. Knows where the first down marker is and fights hard for the required yardage, showing determination and better than expected leg-drive. Not afraid to get his jersey dirty as a runner or even as a blocker/tackler.
 
Intangibles: Carries himself like an NFL quarterback. Highly respected team captain who takes his role as a leader seriously. Comfortable leading vocally or by setting the example on and off the field. Earned his Master's Degree in finance and is working on his doctorate. Durability concern. Missed the final three games of the 2009 season with a grade-3 separation of his throwing shoulder and suffered more injuries to this throwing arm (including undergoing two surgeries on his elbow) in 2010. Father, David, played linebacker at Florida State from 1980-83.
 

Compares to: Tony Romo, Cowboys -- Like Romo (undrafted), Ponder's lack of ideal size and struggles with durability are enough to push him down the board. But his arm strength, accuracy, mobility and intelligence could make him a very effective pro quarterback if he can improve in critical situations.

 

From Favre to Ponder!

What made them pull the trigger that early, maybe nobody would trade with them.

 

Detroit....next!

I would have rather seen Ryan Mallet or the kid from Nevada.  Ponder never impressed me.  But better than what we got

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
The NE Patriots take Nate Solder, OT, Colorado



Pass blocking: Solder's length and athleticism makes him a prototypical pass protector on the blind side. Very difficult to get around when he bends his knees and is smooth in his lateral movement. Resets his hands quickly after initial contact, manages to anchor after a strong initial bull rush. Agile and long enough to combo block down and still push blitzing linebackers around the pocket. Also handles twists and stunts well. Cuts quickly to allow bubble screens to his side. Plays with a narrow base at times, which causes him to lose balance or cross his feet when engaged on outside rushes. Takes short, choppy steps after kick slide, has trouble cutting off quick ends from turning the corner and resorts to diving at their legs. Also gives up the inside lane too frequently. NFL-caliber ends can get under his pads and drive him back on occasion because of his height and inconsistent knee-bend.


Run blocking: Very willing and able run blocker on the edge with exceptional mobility for his size. Good get-off and upper-body strength allows him to latch onto defensive ends and stand-up defenders and take them out of the play. Despite his height, he plays with leverage at the point of attack and can widen his base to anchor. Nimble and quick, he seals his edge easily, gets out in front of screens well, and can block multiple defenders to wall off the back side. Quicker defenders can get under his pads, however, and disengage to move down the line and stop inside runs.


Pulling/trapping: Does not work behind the line very often from the left tackle spot, but his combination of size and mobility should allow him to do so at the next level. Effective getting around the tight end to take out targets on the outside. Can drop his hips to negate defenders at the second level. Has flexibility to get his hands on the inside defender, though his height can make it difficult to stay with smaller, quicker defenders when he doesn't first lock on.


Initial Quickness: Gets off the snap fairly well for his size, but is inconsistent with his kick-slide and hand quickness, which could cause problems for him against better NFL ends. Able to deliver a pop as a drive blocker, stopping defensive ends in their tracks or even pushing his man off the line of scrimmage.


Downfield: Exceptional feet and agility make him a threat to take out defenders in space. Very quick getting to the second and third levels. Locates targets well downfield, keeps his feet moving to gain the correct angle and hands strong and active to latch onto linebackers and move them out of the play. Will throw a shoulder into a defender at times instead of sustaining the block.


Intangibles: Owns the work ethic to become a Pro Bowl offensive tackle. In the spring of 2009, he was awarded the John Wooten Award for outstanding work ethic and the offensive line's Iron Buffalo Award for hard work, dedication, toughness and total poundage lifted in the weight room. Needs to become more of a vocal leader on the field, though he does play with attitude and competitiveness and is not afraid to go through the whistle and talk to defenders on the field. Very good student, had a 3.93 GPA in high school and was one of 16 National Football Foundation Scholar-Athletes in 2010. Brother, John, played linebacker at Stanford.


Compares to: Robert Gallery, ex-Raiders -- Solder is not coming into the draft with the hype Gallery did out of Iowa in 2004, but their size and athleticism are remarkably similar. The fact Gallery ended up a guard for the Raiders, even though he's a Pro-Bowl caliber one, can't settle well with teams considering Solder for their open left tackle spot.


Last edited on Fri Apr 29th, 2011 02:52 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
SD with the 18th pick takes Corey Liuget, DT, Illinois

 

Pass rush: Tough for many college interior linemen to handle one-on-one in pass protection. Quick enough to beat lesser linemen off the snap at three-tech, uses his hands to free himself from block when there is enough space to do so. Gets his man on skates or pushes through a block (or double) to the quarterback to get pressure. Also strong and quick enough to play on the nose in obvious passing situations. Recovers from strong punch to run through a gap immediately. Does not have elite closing speed, but his hustle and ability to stay low make him difficult to escape within or outside the pocket.
 
Run defense: Stout defender who plays with a strong base. Penetrates into the backfield with quickness. Lines up at three and five-technique spots. Capable of stack-shed inside or outside. Gets past reach blocks on inside runs with quick feet and strength to keep blocker on his shoulder. Usually keeps his head up to find the ball. Lacks acceleration to keep outside containment as a five-technique. Not consistent defeating cut blocks with his hands.
 
Explosion: Not elite in his first step, but has enough to be a pass rush and penetrating run-stopper inside. Ballcarriers feel every bit of his strength when he tackles them, and blockers are bruised up with his punching and swiping throughout the game.
 
Strength: His ability to play multiple positions not only comes from his quick feet, but also his strength. Lands a big punch into the chest of his man, swipes with aggression to move the blocker aside. Uses his low center of gravity to his advantage, getting leverage to stack one-on-one and shed to either direction when playing two-gap at nose tackle. Senses zone block, uses blocker's inertia against him with a strong push to get into the backfield. Usually anchors well against single and double blocks, but can get moved by NFL-caliber linemen.
 
Tackling: Strong upper body, hustle, and good length make him an excellent tackler. Engulfs running backs in the backfield when able to penetrate. Built low to the ground, displays excellent change of direction ability to stay in front of backs cutting against the grain. Hustles 10-15 yards downfield to make or help on tackles. Adds himself to piles when able. Lacks elite closing speed to chase down backs from behind. Tends to run out of steam when playing a lot at the end of games.
 

Intangibles: Coaches say Liuget is a leader in the locker and meetings rooms. Chose Illinois over southern schools because of head coach Ron Zook. Wished to transfer after two years in Champaign due to home sickness; mother said he would not be welcome home if he transferred.

 

Giants on the clock....Costanzo?

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Anybody surprised that Prince Amukamara is still on the board?

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
No real surpises so far other than Ponder being selected by Minnesota.

Last edited on Fri Apr 29th, 2011 03:01 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
19th pick and the Giants select Prince Amukamara, CB, Nebraska

 

The football player formerly known as Prince was the biggest slide so far in the 1st Round.

 

Read & React: Strong instincts with very quick reactions. Reads the quarterback's eyes and anticipates routes, closing quickly to jump underneath routes. Gets into the flat in a hurry to attack screen plays and outside runs. Inconsistent biting on double moves and pump fakes, will get overly aggressive during the course of a game and give up the deep ball.
 
Man Coverage: Perfect NFL press-cover corner with his combination of size, strength and speed. Is patient in man coverage, reading the receiver's move and reacting quickly. Quick feet and smooth hips to turn and run, maintains contact with most any receiver down the sideline. Closes well when playing off the line, attacks midsection and wraps to tackle. Capable of playing very physically, especially in the five-yard area. Has the lateral movement to shadow jerk routes. Maintains cushion in his backpedal.
 
Zone Coverage: Owns the prototypical man-press build but has the closing speed and physicality to excel in zone coverage. Excellent anticipation of underneath throws, cuts under receivers to make a play on the ball with exceptional hand-eye coordination. Comes off deep routes to support shorter patterns to his side. Secure tackler who rarely gives up yards after the catch. Has dropped interceptions not thrown in his breadbasket. Fair foot speed in his backpedal, but needs to stay over his feet instead of leaning backward.
 
Closing/Recovery: Excellent closing speed for his size. Changes from pedal to forward motion quickly, plants hard and has a burst to the ball. Inconsistent recovery speed if frozen by double move, can get back into the play (and make a play on the ball) but quicker receivers seem to maintain separation.
 
Run Support: Has the size and aggressive nature to excel in run support. Willing cut tackler, gets into the thigh of the running back. Good strength to rip off receiver blocks, could be more consistent using his hands to disengage. Sticks his nose into piles and can stand up running backs coming with a head of steam.
 
Tackling: Excellent strength for the position, effective wrapping up receivers after the catch or cutting down backs in run support. Breaks down in space to avoid missed tackles. Will attack the shoulder pads of running backs to bring them down or force them out of bounds. Very effective cut tackler whether attacking the thighs of running backs or violently taking out the legs of receivers in the open field. Even when he does not bring down the ballcarrier, he gets enough to slow him down giving help time to arrive. Helps teammates finish off tackles in space. Could be more consistent getting off receiver blocks.
 

Intangibles: Spiritual man, involved with Fellowship of Christian Athletes. Has matured greatly since arriving on campus, applying himself on the practice field and the film room more diligently since 2009. Parents are from Nigeria.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
The 20th overall pick and the TB Bucs take Adrian Clayborn, DE, Iowa

 

Pass rush: Strong pass rusher able to rips off blocks with violent hands to get the corner. Good closing speed to the quarterback, even after absorbing a big punch from offensive tackles off the snap. Able to break down in space to get his hands on ballcarriers. Tight ends and fullbacks have little chance to handle his strength and strong punch on the edge. Will pause his pass rush to knock a running back off his route into the flat and continue on his path to the quarterback. Pass rush comes from strength and hustle, not an explosive first step that allows him to turn the corner. Does not have counter rush moves and will not be able to swipe aside most starting NFL tackles. Appeared less sudden and relentless in 2010.
 
Run defense: Active and stout run defender who stays square to the line of scrimmage and often gives a second and third effort. Plays with leverage, able to stack tackles and shed in either direction using strong hands to get to the ballcarrier -- even if pushed off the line a bit by stronger tackles. Feels cut blocks, keeps his eyes up and uses his hands well. Uses his hands to use tackles' momentum against them. Flows through traffic, keeps his feet moving, and separates from linemen with active hands on inside runs. Lowers his shoulder to anchor against pulling guards behind the line to help linebackers stay free. Consistently keeps contain on his side of the line, especially against mobile quarterbacks, and is able to change direction to chase down backs going for the sideline. Lack of height allows larger tackles to engulf him.
 
Explosion: Doesn't have the typical explosive first step of most rush ends because of his girth and lack of ideal height. He is considered an explosive player against the run and pass, because he has one of the strongest punches and most effective hands in the class.
 
Strength: Uses his low center of gravity and strong upper and lower body to play with great leverage. Consistently leverages blockers and disengages from blocks with strong and violent hands. Lacks height to block field goals but provides good push and penetration inside; also a factor on punts as protectors cannot handle his strength and quickness.
 
Tackling: A solid tackler who is very active and stays square and low, but his technique is not always sound. Strong arms allow him to be explosive when coming straight on and force fumbles by ripping or simply creating a big impact. Punches blockers in space to keep them from latching on, stays alive to make a play. Doesn't have great length and will often slip or bounce off ballcarriers; his initial impact might be strong enough to bring down college running back, but NFL runners might have more success staying alive.
 

Intangibles: Unquestioned emotional leader of the Iowa defense on and off the field. Named a permanent team captain and praised by coaches for his character and work ethic. Teams will check out nerves in his right arm and neck to ensure the Erb's Palsy he suffered at birth is a non-issue. Charged with assaulting an Iowa City taxi driver in January 2009 after reportedly confronting a taxi driver who honked his horn in a traffic jam. Pled guilty to misdemeanor disorderly conduct in March 2010, but was not suspended by Iowa coaches because they felt the situation required only minor internal penalties.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Cleveland makes trade with KC

 

The Cleveland Stains with the 21st selection takes Phil Taylor from Baylor, DT

 

Pass rush: Though his job is usually not to provide primary pass rush, he can push the pocket with strength and flashes quickness off the snap and a swim move to get past lesser centers. Gives good effort to reach the quarterback if he sits in the pocket too long. Tries violent hands to shed blocks. Not very effective on inside twists, though he can take out the left tackle when twisting outside to free up the defensive end. Once stood up by initial contact, it's tough for him to re-start his rush.
 
Run defense: Shows excellent strength and mobility as a run defender. Plays with leverage against double-teams and keeps his shoulders square to the line of scrimmage. Pushes back his man and spins off single and tandem blocks with balance to make the play. Moves down the line well, stays low despite his height to wrap up shorter backs. Willing and able to reach the sideline, takes deep angles to prevent huge runs. Defeats cut blocks and maintains balance to track down ballcarriers. Gets low in short-yardage and goal-line situations. Does not dominate smaller centers. At his best when used in a rotation.
 
Explosion: Explodes from four-point stance into blockers, consistently getting push up front. Gets off low and quick near goal line to set the line backwards. Despite his size, flashes the quickness to penetrate the "A" gap. Requires double-teams to keep him out of the backfield.
 
Strength: Huge frame and upper-body development give him the strength to be a 3-4 nose tackle at the next level. Moves offensive linemen to either side with relative ease when covering two gaps. Forces fumbles with one hand punching at the ball while ballcarrier comes through the hole. Uses leverage to hold the line against double teams.
 
Tackling: Running backs get swallowed up when crossing his path, and he can separate the ball from a ballcarrier with pure strength. Stays low despite his height and will capture backs from behind if they have not yet hit their stride. Chase and hustle are impressive for his size, will chase backs down the line, help linebackers make stops at the second level, and takes deep angles to chase down running backs 20 yards down the sideline.
 
Intangibles: Sprained his knee in 2007 preseason at Penn State, losing starting job to future first-round pick Jared Odrick. Charged with felony aggravated assault during a fraternity function at a Penn State student union in October 2007; the charge was eventually dropped. Really turned up his game the second half of 2010; scouts could see that as maturity or wonder if he can maintain that level of play.
 

Compares to: Kris Jenkins, Jets -- Big and powerful, Taylor projects nicely as an interior player in both the 4-3 and 3-4 alignments. If teams are convinced that the off-field concerns that prompted his transfer out of Penn State are a thing of the past, he could wind up a first-round pick.

 

The Colts up next.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
With pick 22, the Indy Colts select Anthony Castonzo, OT, Boston College

 

Pass blocking: Good initial quickness out of his stance. Gains depth efficiently in his kick-slide. Plays with good balance, moving on the balls of his feet with his knees bent and shoulders square. Shows good lateral agility to slide and mirror the pass rusher. Appears to be quick enough for the cut-block on quick throws. Prototypical long arms to grasp the pass rusher and has improved his strength to control. Can struggle with leverage and be walked back into the pocket by short, stout pass rushers able to get into his chest. Lacks the sand in his pants to anchor sufficiently.
 
Run blocking: Gets a good initial push, but loses the leverage battle quickly and struggles to sustain. Gives good effort and has made significant improvement in this area over the past three seasons. Has a tendency to get his hands too far outside the numbers, but with greater strength would have more control. Relies on positioning and technique and lacks the power to drive defenders off the ball, despite improvement in this area. Flashes some leg drive when he gets under the pads of an opponent.
 
Pulling/trapping: Has above-average straight-line speed and is surprisingly effective changing direction and hitting a moving target blocking in space. Technically refined trap blocker, though his lack of bulk and ideal strength make him less effective. Good athleticism overall. Should continue to improve in this area.
 
Initial Quickness: Good initial quickness off the snap. Eases out of his stance into pass protection and is typically able to secure the edge. Can be beaten by pure speed rushers able to turn him and get under his reach. Gains an initial advantage in the running game due to his quickness and is often able to turn and seal his defender from the action.
 
Downfield: Lacks ideal balance and strength, but not effort, in blocking downfield. Works to sustain. Has made improvements in this area over his career.
 
Intangibles: Has started all 53 games of his career, tying the Boston College all-time record. Was the first true freshman to start the season opener on the offensive line in 10 years. Enrolled as a biochemistry major in the College of Arts & Sciences and was an Illinois State Scholar in high school. Won the Scanlan Award, BC's highest honor, after his senior season. Goal is to one day conduct cancer research.
 

Compares to: Marc Colombo, Cowboys - The Boston College uniforms, nearly identical size and similar combine results all make it difficult to not project Castonzo having a similar career to Colombo. However, that makes some teams wonder if Castonzo has a future as a long-term starting left tackle.

 

Iggles up next....Where do they go?  OL?   DB?

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Why was that guy wearing a Jets jersey carrying around a replica championship wrestling belt around his shoulder in the audience?  Dork!

The Ultimate Sin
Hall Of Famer


Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location: Parts Unknown, Sri Lanka
Posts: 9860
Status: 
Offline
Papa Voo wrote:
brodiescomics wrote: Wow. The Lions D-Line is officially SICK! Too bad Stafford will probably be dead by Week 6.

Yep.  At least there is some consistency and vision in what this coach wants to do.  Defense!  Defense!  Defense!  They do need to strengthen those corners, though.


It also means they won't go after Haynesworth as rumored. Now Ochocinco is the current rumor.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Danny Watkins, OG, Baylor goes to the Philly Eagles with the 23rd selection

 

 

Pass blocking: Excellent college left tackle despite his lack of experience. Sits into a good posture after his kick-slide. Comes out to meet the defensive end, mirrors opponents' lateral movement. Anchors against large defensive ends by extending his arms and widening his base. Escorts speed rushers around the pocket with arm-bar and nice footwork. Excellent cut-blocker, gets low quickly and takes man out totally out of the play. Still learning to protect inside lane. Must consistently keep feet moving to sustain after initial contact and prevent secondary rush.
 
Run blocking: Adept positional blocker, has good strength and attitude to seal his man inside or outside. Plays with a wide base, uses his strong legs to get forward movement. Aggressive and sticks to defenders once latched on; extends arms to push defender back or even put him on the ground. Gets under his man's pads when drive-blocking, keeps his hips low and feet moving. Still learning how to explode from three-point stance. Occasionally lunges to reach his man or is shed by violent hand play.
 
Pulling/trapping: Usually not asked to pull or trap from the left tackle position, but his agility gives him a real chance to succeed moving behind the line and into space. Can hit a target when going to the second level and NFL linebackers will meet him to attack the ball inside. Will take to coaching to find inside target and open holes.
 
Initial Quickness: Lacks the elite initial quickness of typical early-round picks, but combines fair athleticism with very good technique so it does not affect his ability in pass protection. NFL defenders might take advantage with their exceptional outside speed. Gets out of a drive-blocking stance quickly and should improve with time.
 
Downfield: Has the athleticism to reach linebackers at the next level, and gives the effort to reach multiple defenders in space. Sustains once engaged with upper- and lower-body strength. Might not hit his target due to indecision and being a step slow.
 
Intangibles: Older prospect (turned 26 during 2010 season) with maturity and work ethic. Full of personality, referred to as "gregarious" in the team's media guide. Canadian national who played hockey and rugby in high school; has two fake front teeth as a result of his work as a hockey enforcer. Worked as a firefighter during and after high school, originally looked into Butte JC because of their firefighting academy. Very raw, only four years of playing experience.
 

Compares to: Logan Mankins, Patriots -- While perhaps not an elite athlete, Watkins' prototype size, strength and nasty, physical play inside should make him an immediate contributor at the pro level despite having just four years of football experience. Like Mankins, Watkins could surprise as a late first-round pick.

 

Saints on the clock....Does Ingram go here?

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
The Ultimate Sin wrote: Papa Voo wrote:
brodiescomics wrote: Wow. The Lions D-Line is officially SICK! Too bad Stafford will probably be dead by Week 6.

Yep.  At least there is some consistency and vision in what this coach wants to do.  Defense!  Defense!  Defense!  They do need to strengthen those corners, though.


Now Ochocinco is the current rumor.

Bad, very bad.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Da Saints with the 24th pick goes with Cameron Jordan, DE, California

 

Pass rush: Only moderate initial quickness off the snap. Doesn't possess the top-end speed to be more than a marginal pass rusher in the NFL. Relies on his power and technique to pressure the pocket. Has a strong club move and rip and swim moves. Has the hand strength to knock away the initial punch of the pass blocker and often supplies his own punch to drive his opponent into the pocket. Good use of leverage and very good strength for the bull rush. Locates the ball and shows a late burst to close when opportunities are presented. Has long arms but is still developing recognition and timing to get his hands up. Has only five passes broken up in 50 games.
 
Run defense: Stout run defender. Understands gap responsibilities in the 3-4 defense. Has the long arms to keep defenders away from his chest and the bulk to anchor. Locates the ball quickly and pursues hard. Good balance and appears more agile in run defense forcing the back wide to the sideline than he is as a pass rusher. Good effort in lateral and downfield pursuit.
 
Explosion: Flashes an explosive initial burst but is inconsistent in this area. Doesn't have the speed or flexibility as an edge rusher to take full advantage of his spotty suddenness, but can shock his opponent when he times the snap correctly. Shows a late burst to close on the ballcarrier, resulting in big collisions. Forced four career fumbles.
 
Strength: Arguably his greatest asset. Possesses very good upper- and lower-body strength to remain as a five technique defensive end in the 3-4 or a base (left) defensive end for the 4-3 alignment. Comes off the snap low and hard and has the bulk to create a pile. Can drive his opponent into the pocket with his bull rush and slide off to make the tackle when the ballcarrier is near.
 
Tackling: Good strength for the drag-down tackle. Will lower his shoulder and bring his hips for the big collision. Strong enough that he can slip off blockers and find the ball. Doesn't have great balance or flexibility to break down in the open field to tackle elusive ballcarriers but his long arms and good hand-eye coordination help him to at least trip up the target.
 
Intangibles: High-effort player. Plays to the whistle and pursues hard. Good bloodlines. Father, Steve Jordan, was a six-time Pro Bowl tight end during 13 seasons with the Minnesota Vikings. Suspended for 2008 season opener after an arrest for suspicion of a DUI -- the only game he missed at Cal. Played in 50 of 51 games, including 32 starts. Characterized by teammates as a "locker-room clown" and a "just a big kid at heart." Had his maturity questioned by coaches early in his career, though he emerged as more of a leader since.
 

Compares to: Cory Redding, Ravens -- The long, athletic Redding played well in Baltimore's 3-4 after struggling at times as a strong-side end early in his career; Jordan should be fortunate enough to use his strength and quickness in a three-man front right away.

 

Seattle up...QB?

Last edited on Fri Apr 29th, 2011 03:44 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Seattle is trying to move down. 

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Seattle at 25 goes with James Carpenter, OT, Alabama

Not that much of a reach, but sort of surprising due to the needs of Seattle.

Positives: Impressive athlete. Excellent technique, decent knee bend and good hand placement. Can sink hips and generate power. Slides feet and extends arms well in pass protection. Has power in hands and can move defenders. Can run and hit second-level targets. Good ability to anchor, seal, trap and pull. Well-schooled in an NFL-style offense. Tough and durable, never missing a start.
Negatives: Lacks the elite foot quickness needed for the NFL left tackle position. Somewhat stiff in hips and hence doesn't change directions well. Frame is good except legs are a bit long. Vulnerable to double moves, especially inside. Pass protection set is somewhat high. Can be late off snap, mostly with a lot of crowd noise. Dives too much.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Do you smell the stench filtering in?  The Ratbirds are on the clock.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
The Ravens have passed on their selection?

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
KC grabs WR Jonathon Baldwin, WR, Pitt



Release: Gets off the line quickly considering his long, lanky frame. Presses corners when they play off -- which was commonplace at Pitt -- forcing them to turn their hips. Stutters around his man to get the sideline and separate when let free off the line. Locked up in press by smaller corners, however, must learn to use his hands to get off jam.


Hands: Capable of making sensational catches but dropped catchable passes when the team needed plays. Can snag high throws using height and vertical leap, also lays out for passes using great length. Fails to high-point jump balls consistently, too often waiting until they fall into his chest. Senses when big hits are coming.


Route running: Runs most of the route tree. His specialty is the nine route, but is also used on shallow and intermediate crosses. Willing to sit down in the zone over the middle. Gives head fake to get inside position on skinny post and seam. Could tighten up his footwork, rounds into and out of crossing routes instead of plant-and-driving. Must prove the quickness to run jerk routes inside.


After the catch: One of the areas in which he needs work. Gets the most out of plays when on the run, eluding oncoming defenders by allowing them to slide past. Long arms allow him to hold off smaller defenders. Flashes the balance to keep running after high-pointing a pass down the sideline. Height and average strength takes away his ability to elude NFL-caliber tackles in short areas. Jumps when unnecessary, taking away run-after-catch chances. Takes circuitous routes on comeback routes.


Blocking: Shows promise as a blocker with better effort. Usually takes aggression to the defender, churning his legs to push him back 10-15 yards at times. Has the length to hold off his man. Lacks flexibility to mirror NFL defensive backs and is very inconsistent moving his feet to sustain throughout the play.


Intangibles: Scouts will have questions about his attitude and maturity. Charged with misdemeanor indecent assault, harassment and disorderly conduct in May 2009 after an incident involving a female student on campus shuttle bus; charges eventually dropped. Father was a defensive lineman for the Panthers in the early 1980s. His cousin, Charles Fisher, played defensive back at West Virginia in the late 1990s and played in the NFL.


 

Baltimore was working out a trade and this why they passed on the 26th pick.

 

With the 27th pick, the Ravens select Jimmy Smith

Read & React: Reads the body language of receivers and keeps his eyes in the backfield to detect what's coming. Reacts quickly to throws in his area to his assignment or another receiver. Likes to attack the run but gets overaggressive, biting hard on play-action fakes. Some of his quick reactions are negated by his inability to get off blocks.
 
Man Coverage: Physical press corner. Not afraid to extend his hand (usually his left) at the line of scrimmage to keep receivers from getting into his route. Maintains contact throughout the five-yard area. Lined up against opponents' biggest receiver, playing outside and in the slot. Flashes good feet in his pedal, but could be lower and more balanced. Must keep his feet moving as receivers approach when playing off; they eat up his cushion quickly. Flips open to trail even if he plays outside leverage and the receiver runs inside. Uses long arms to reach in front of receivers to knock away passes without interfering. Uses strength and good timing to dislodge the ball from his man while he tries to secure the catch. Fast enough to stop quick screens behind the line when playing off. His hands for the interception are improving, but work needs to be done. Needs to tighten up his footwork when transitioning from pedal to plant-and-drive.
 
Zone Coverage: Good awareness in zone coverage. Comes off receivers leaving his area to pick up underneath routes. Stays between two receivers on the outside if he sees his safety help has been taken away by seam routes, but will end up in no man's land occasionally not trusting over-the-top help. Attacks receivers in front of him. Size makes him difficult to for receivers to avoid after the catch. His height and vertical make throwing over him and in front of safeties perilous.
 
Closing/Recovery: Combines speed with length to close on the ball. Good recovery speed for his size, can flip his hips and wrap up receivers in trail coverage. His height and ability to find the ball in the air prevent quarterbacks from challenging over the top. Undercuts crossing routes by closing hard and extending; also takes chances NFL quarterbacks can exploit.
 
Run Support: Owns prototypical size to be a run stopper on the edge. Effective as a wrap-up or cut tackler. Knows to chase at a deep angle to prevent touchdowns on runs to the opposite side of the field. Usually gets outside position to force plays to linebackers, showing quickness to move around his man, but needs to be more violent with his hands to disengage from the blocks of larger receivers to make tackles.
 
Tackling: Physical tackler with NFL size and excellent length to wrap, but must get more consistent in the open field. Able to knock away passes and force fumbles while he wraps up receivers. Must drop his hips and break down more quickly attacking ballcarriers on the run, as they can elude him with a quick move or slip off when he tries to tackle shoulder pads.
 
Intangibles: Maturing player taking over as a leader on the field, directing teammates. Began studying film before his junior season. Missed first two games in 2008 due to injury. Suffered concussion against Baylor in 2010.
 

Compares to: Antonio Cromartie, Jets - Smith possesses similar size and length to help neutralize bigger playmaking wide receivers on the outside.


 

Last edited on Fri Apr 29th, 2011 04:10 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
NE just traded the 28th pick to the NO Saints, so expect them to select Mark Ingram.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
It's official, da Saints take Heisman winner and Alabama RB Mark Ingram with the 28th pick

 

Inside running: Possesses the deal frame for running between the tackles. Quickly presses the line of scrimmage and has the burst to get to and through the hole. Keeps his shoulders squared to the line and runs hard with a low center of gravity. His feet churn through contact and allow him to play bigger on short-yardage runs. Good awareness of the first-down marker. Has the leg drive and forward lean to finish runs falling forward. Instinctive runner with a good feel for when to bounce off blocks and set up cutback lanes. Can plant and drive to capitalize on a crease. Good vision and acceleration to get into the secondary. Does not possess elite stopwatch speed, but has enough to break free for long gains. Excellent ball security -- two fumbles in his career.
 
Outside running: Possesses good but not great speed to get to the edge. Best attributes as an outside runner are his vision to identify opening holes and the burst and power he shows coming out of decisive cuts. Doesn't waste time running laterally unless he sees he has the corner. Can make defenders miss in tight quarters with good lateral agility, but isn't a dancer.
 
Breaking tackles: Surprisingly powerful runner with a low center of gravity. He keeps his legs churning through contact. Won't wow with his ability to run over defenders, but is tough to bring down. Defenders have a hard time lining up a clean shot on him despite his broad frame and he shows good shiftiness when cornered. Capable of absorbing or delivering a big hit and maintaining his balance. Defenders have to wrap him up.
 
Blocking: Cognizant pass blocker. Is willing to take on the hard-charging defender and shows good effort and physicality to gain a stalemate. When trying to cut defenders he often gets too low, allowing defenders to easily leap over him.
 
Receiving: Reliable receiver out of the backfield with soft hands and good flexibility to extend and pluck the ball. Secures the ball quickly. Good vision for the screen game and he has the patience to set up blocks, rather than run past them.
 

Intangibles: Son of former New York Giants wide receiver Mark Ingram, who is serving time for fraud and money laundering. The first running back to win the Heisman and the national championship in the same season since Tony Dorsett (Pittsburgh, 1976). Won the Derrick Thomas Community Award following 2010 spring practice.

Last edited on Fri Apr 29th, 2011 04:19 am by Papa Voo



 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline
LOL Mark Ingram looks exactly like Ice Cube.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
nyhack56 wrote: LOL Mark Ingram looks exactly like Ice Cube.
LOL

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
The 29th pick by the Chicago Bears snatches Gabe Carimi, OT, Wisconsin

 

Pass blocking: Has the elite agility and nimble feet to protect the quarterback's blindside. Very difficult to turn the corner against because of his lateral movement and solid footwork. Also protects the inside lane well. Delivers a strong hand punch capable of knocking back an opponent, and is able to recoil and extend again. Uses his length to block his man with one hand and knock an edge blitzer off his path with the other. Quick to cut on bubble screens and reverses, though he could get more of his man's legs to be truly effective. Bends at the waist while engaged; usually holds on to prevent secondary rush but will also end up on the ground too often.
 
Run blocking: Known as an athletic pass protector, but is a strong blocker for the Badger run game. Has strong upper and lower body builds despite his height. Plays with leverage against stout defensive ends and tackles on the edge, can get under their pads and churn his legs to move them down or off the line. Effective combo blocker, gets a hand on a tackle and still manages to push ends out of the play on strong-side runs. Leans or bends at the waist to latch on at times, will get shed and lose his balance.
 
Pulling/trapping: Usually not asked to pull or trap from the outside, but down-blocks often and has the quickness and footwork to move behind the line. Gets his quick hands out in front to get a piece of inside defenders before moving to the MIKE linebacker. Can sustain blocks in space because of his length and nimble feet.
 
Initial Quickness: Elite first step in his kick slide and lateral movement, does not get beat off the edge very often. Also explodes off the ball on run plays, is capable of driving his man back a few yards. Defenders will take advantage of the quickness to take him upfield or knock him off balance, however.
 
Downfield: Excellent footwork and agility to get downfield. Reaches linebackers at the second level and defensive backs further downfield equally well. Knows the proper angle to cut off defenders from the ballcarrier. Good lateral movement once engaged, gives effort to sustain against smaller defenders. Tends to bend at the waist and punch instead of moving after initial contact.
 
Intangibles: Solid player with strong work ethic, as well as football and general intelligence. Received multiple Academic All-American and All-Big Ten awards. Missed three games in 2008 with right MCL sprain, but played through maladies in 2009: slight tear in right MCL scarring, left AC joint (shoulder) sprain, H1N1 virus. Fasted for 24 hours before 2008 game against Iowa in observance of Yom Kippur.
 

Compares to: Michael Roos, Titans -- Roos might have been a first-round pick, as Carimi is projected to be, if he had played at Wisconsin instead of Eastern Washington. Like Roos, expect Carimi to get a shot on the left side because of his toughness despite lacking exceptional athleticism.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Here come the J-A-C-K-A-...whoops....J-E-T-S!

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
The Jets with the 30th pick select Muhammed Wilkerson, DT, Temple

Pass rush: Overwhelms college tackles with size and strength, then chases down quarterbacks with his length and nimble feet. Lacks a quick first step, but flashes a swim move and closing speed to the passer. Feels cut blocks, keeps his hands involved and watches for the quick throw in his direction. Must improve his hand usage to consistently get off blocks inside. Eats up multiple blockers on inside twists to free up other defensive linemen. Effective bull-rushing college tackles when coming from outside the tackle, but rarely pushes back interior linemen. Not sudden or flexible enough to get the corner.
 
Run defense: Agile five-technique who lines up on either side of the formation. Patient and keeps his eyes in the backfield to contain; very solid in his outside assignment. Comes off outside path or double teams inside to spin/shed, catching back running through the hole. Uses shoulder to hold off blockers while slanting into the backfield. Not exceptional change-of-direction agility but his length allows him to get a hand on ballcarriers trying to get through the hole. Not a dominating interior player despite his size. NFL blockers will win the leverage battle until he gets stronger and more physical inside.
 
Explosion: Has the potential to be very explosive off the snap, but comes off a bit slow and must use his strength to pop into the chest of blockers. Can utilize his strength and length to hit hard and squeeze the football from a ballcarrier.
 
Strength: Flashes strong hands, playing with leverage, and the ability to push off linemen to make tackles. Gets stood up at the line too often instead of bull-rushing his man backward or pushing his way through the double-team.
 
Tackling: Tall, thick frame and long arms make him difficult to avoid in tight quarters and to shed once latched on. Gets a lot of tackles with hustle, keeps his feet moving when chasing from behind. Lacks superior straight-line speed but gives excellent effort to the sideline. Must drop his hips to bring down more elusive pro ballcarriers.
 

Intangibles: Plays a lot of snaps given his size but gives good effort throughout the game. Attended Hargrave Military Academy. Temple's defensive MVP in 2010. No known character issues.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
The Pittsburgh Stillers select Cameron Heyward, DE, Ohio State

Pass rush: Though not a true outside pass-rush threat, he will pressure the quarterback no matter where he lines up. Lines up on either end, as well as at the five-technique and uses quickness off the snap and excellent length to split double-teams, get inside of linemen when man-up, or push back guards into the pocket. Agile enough to be effective on twists from the outside. Running backs and tight ends are no match against Heyward in pass protection. Tough one-on-one matchup for guards inside due to his lateral quickness, hustle and club move. Corrals and punishes quarterbacks in the backfield, closing quickly and exploding into the tackle. Inconsistent disengaging from blocks; better left tackles can stand him up and latch on with impunity. Can be pushed back with an initial punch but keeps coming to provide a strong secondary rush. Not a great threat to turn the corner from the edge. Forces tackle up the field and can spin inside to prevent scrambles or pressure quarterbacks stepping up into the pocket. Has the length to affect passing lanes when unable to reach the passer but could get his hands up more often.
 
Run defense: Strong against the run whether lining up against guards or tackles. Crashes down to close gaps. Can spin off of blocks when runners cut back against the grain. Crashes down on inside runs, using length to get into a play. Good punch to knock his man back, attacks the ball when it is in his area. Maintains edge discipline to prevent bootleg plays on his side of the field. His height can be used against him -- he fails to get low on occasion and loses leverage against stronger guards and double teams. Susceptible to cut blocks, though he is athletic enough to recover and get back into the play. Too strong for tight ends to handle one-on-one and uses leverage and hands to blow through edge blocks. Only adequate backfield awareness, will be sucked in on misdirection and lacks great change-of-direction agility.
 
Explosion: Excellent quickness off the snap, splits double teams with ease and provides a rare pop into his blocker's pads to knock him back. Will be first man off the ball when pinning his ears back on the rush. Very difficult for slower linemen to match his combination of strength and explosiveness, makes beating them look easy.
 
Strength: Flashes great upper-body and hand strength, dominating most college linemen with leverage and burst, but does not consistently overwhelm better players. Does not have exceptional muscle definition in his arms. Plays tall inside and lacks a great anchor to maintain his ground against NFL-caliber double-team blocking.
 
Tackling: Solid tackler; can be explosive and always gives good effort. Leans when closing on the ball to ensure contact and his long arms allow him to wrap consistently. Good hustle downfield on screens. Also follows plays down the line and can chase to the opposite sideline. Best when attacking plays in front of him. Though he can redirect well for his height and size, he doesn't change direction easily and lacks the immediate burst to play on the edge in the NFL.
 
Intangibles: He has a great attitude, work ethic and immense talent. Well-liked by his teammates and coaches, he has fun playing the game. Hustles without wearing down much during the game. Returned for his senior season because he enjoyed college and wanted to win a national championship. Father, the late Craig "Ironhead" Heyward, was a star running back in college and the NFL. Stepfather is Cory Blackwell, a star basketball player for the Wisconsin Badgers in the 1980s who played one season for the NBA's Seattle Sonics.
 

Compares to: Marcus Spears, Cowboys -- Long, strong and experienced in both fronts, don't expect Heyward to post big sack totals, but he'll hold up well at the point of attack, especially as a five-technique defensive end in the 3-4 alignment.

 

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
The Green Bay Packer close out the First Round with the 32nd Pick and taking Derek Sherrod, OT, Mississippi State

Pass blocking: Good initial quickness. Eases out of his stance and has the lateral agility and balance to mirror the defender. Good hand strength and has long arms that he uses to latch onto and control his opponent. Generally plays with good knee-bend and leverage, but can lose his anchor when he tires. Can become fundamentally lazy and lean into the defender; gets knocked off-balance and gives up the inside lane. Should improve in this area with greater focus on his technique, but has an upside-down triangle build due to broad shoulders and relatively narrow hips, making him top-heavy and susceptible to being overpowered. Among his better attributes is his recognition. Recognizes the blitz coming and gets a good initial pop on his primary target (defensive end) before passing him off to the guard and working his way outside to catch the rushing linebacker or stunting defensive tackle.
 
Run blocking: Comes off the ball too high and lacks the pad level and power to consistently knock defenders off the line. Good quickness and hand strength to turn and seal off defenders from the play. Good recognition to release from double-team and get out to the second level. Scouts would like to see him finish blocks with more authority before releasing.
 
Pulling/trapping: Good initial quickness to release to the second level, but has only average agility to re-direct in the open field. Locates his target, but has to do a better job of anticipating where the defender is going. Isn't fluid enough to change direction and hit the moving target. Too often extends his arms, "catching" the linebacker, which could result in penalty flags when playing against NFL-caliber athletes. Good trap blocker due to his initial quickness, big frame and recognition.
 
Initial Quickness: Good, though not elite, initial quickness off the snap. Has the agility and long arms to handle most right defensive ends (and thus remain at left tackle), but due to the fact that he is a bit top-heavy and lacks elite balance, is susceptible to quick jab-steps outside and spin or counter moves back to the inside. Is quick enough in the running game to turn and seal off the defender, creating a wall from which the running back can bounce off from.
 
Downfield: Gives good effort to block downfield. Above-average straight-line speed, though his average balance keeps him from being as effective at the second level as his speed and size would indicate. Gets in the way of defenders and has the wingspan to alter their path, but struggles re-directing his charge.
 

Intangibles: Was one of 16 players to win the storied National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame (NFF) Award, which includes a post-graduate $18,000 scholarship. Earned his degree in business with a 3.54 GPA. Is the third Bulldog to win the award and the first since 1989. Team leader voted a captain in 2010. A four-year member of the M-Club, MSU's student-athlete community service organization, he has spent considerable time with the youth of Mississippi. He has served breakfast at Sudduth Elementary School, participated in Sudduth's Kids Fair and read to local students to promote literacy. He has also organized a Thanksgiving food drive.

Road Warrior Yajuta



Joined: Sat Jul 3rd, 2010
Location: D'Iberville, Ms, USA
Posts: 4798
Status: 
Offline
Damn the Saints gave up this year's 2nd round pick and next year's 1st round pick to take Ingram.  I am not sure what to think.  Maybe the injury to Ivory is more severe than we know. Maybe they are going to cut Bush and his high salary. They just signed Thomas to a 4 year deal.  Someone in their backfield is going to go. 

Oh man, Detroit's Interior Line is going to be devastating. Suh and Fairley? Unfucking real, they will be a badass tandem.  Can they be blocked at all?

Last edited on Fri Apr 29th, 2011 04:41 pm by Road Warrior Yajuta

Angelic Assassin



Joined: Mon Dec 27th, 2010
Location: Driving Through Philly, Home Of Losers., Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 6023
Status: 
Offline
beejmi wrote:
Carolina has been on the clock since week ten last year and I don't think they're sure who to take.

I just got home and right at the bottle of page one I'm spilling my beer laughing. OTC since week 10! Priceless!

Back to the thread to see who all got picked. See what new Raiders will be on the next Super Bowl Championship Team, lol!

Road Warrior Yajuta



Joined: Sat Jul 3rd, 2010
Location: D'Iberville, Ms, USA
Posts: 4798
Status: 
Offline
Ironhead's son made the 1st round. I loved watching his Dad play so I hope he has a good career.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Not too much out of the ordinary in the First Round of the NFL Draft in 2011.  There were no major reaches like we usually see from teams like the Raiders or the Browns.  That's right.....Oakland did not have a First Round pick this year. LOL 

Any thoughts?

What did you think of your team's picks?

We should see a pretty deep 2nd and 3rd rounds this year. 

Road Warrior Yajuta



Joined: Sat Jul 3rd, 2010
Location: D'Iberville, Ms, USA
Posts: 4798
Status: 
Offline
Angelic Assassin wrote: beejmi wrote:
Carolina has been on the clock since week ten last year and I don't think they're sure who to take.

I just got home and right at the bottle of page one I'm spilling my beer laughing. OTC since week 10! Priceless!

Back to the thread to see who all got picked. See what new Raiders will be on the next Super Bowl Championship Team, lol!
Raiders gave up their 1st round pick to get Seymour last year.

Angelic Assassin



Joined: Mon Dec 27th, 2010
Location: Driving Through Philly, Home Of Losers., Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 6023
Status: 
Offline
Road Warrior Yajuta wrote:
Angelic Assassin wrote: beejmi wrote:
Carolina has been on the clock since week ten last year and I don't think they're sure who to take.

I just got home and right at the bottle of page one I'm spilling my beer laughing. OTC since week 10! Priceless!

Back to the thread to see who all got picked. See what new Raiders will be on the next Super Bowl Championship Team, lol!
Raiders gave up their 1st round pick to get Seymour last year.


Remembered that after I posted but at least I can hold my head up high and say at least the Raiders didn't make a "bad" pick in the 1st Round! I'm sure they won't let you all down and they'll pick some mutt first chance they get.

Road Warrior Yajuta



Joined: Sat Jul 3rd, 2010
Location: D'Iberville, Ms, USA
Posts: 4798
Status: 
Offline
I hear ya. The Raiders are my other team, and they have had some bad ones.  Davis is fucking senile now. 

CanadianHorseman



Joined: Fri Nov 2nd, 2007
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia Canada
Posts: 14026
Status: 
Offline
Road Warrior Yajuta wrote: I hear ya. The Raiders are my other team, and they have had some bad ones.  Davis is fucking senile now. 

Just Win Baby !!!!!!!!!!!!


Big Garea Fan

 

Joined: Wed Mar 4th, 2009
Location:  
Posts: 2721
Status: 
Offline
Papa Voo wrote: Redskins......What in the hell do they pick?
Can the Redskins draft a new owner??

beejmi
The Big Kahuna


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Philly
Posts: 41572
Status: 
Offline
I don't know most of the players but it is interesting to see what position the teams drafted. I  get the vibe that teams went for "the best available according to our ratings" this year as opposed to drafting for a particular position (Tennessee being the obvious exception) more this year than in the past.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
That Falcons trade with Cleveland still has me scratching my head.

 

The Falcons swapped their First Round pick with the Brownies. They went from the 27th pick to the 6th pick.

The Falcons also surrendered this year's Second Round pick and this year's Fourth Round pick.

Then, they also give Cleveland their First Round and Fourth Round picks next year.

 

That seems like a little much for Julio Jones.  He was not even considered the best receiver in the Draft, but maybe the Falcons have better information, and he becomes one of the top receivers in the league.

Last edited on Fri Apr 29th, 2011 11:35 am by Papa Voo

khawk
Hall Of Famer


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Canada
Posts: 15726
Status: 
Offline
Did that Bowers kid get drafted? It seemed to come off the to the analysts as surprising that he didn't go early in the draft, and by glancing quickly here I didn't see his name listed.

stingmark



Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location: Cop City, California USA
Posts: 9390
Status: 
Offline
Papa Voo wrote: brodiescomics wrote: Wow. The Lions D-Line is officially SICK! Too bad Stafford will probably be dead by Week 6.

Yep.  At least there is some consistency and vision in what this coach wants to do.  Defense!  Defense!  Defense!  They do need to strengthen those corners, though.


Agree with both of you. They need some o line help, if they want Stafford to remain upright during the season? I get the whole "Gotta have the best D" thing, and we're getting to that, but, they need to address the O line real soon. Draft guys keep saying they need to draft CB's, we need to also get some O linemen too, or Stafford's going down again.

 

JB5



Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 1018
Status: 
Offline
khawk wrote: Did that Bowers kid get drafted? It seemed to come off the to the analysts as surprising that he didn't go early in the draft, and by glancing quickly here I didn't see his name listed.


Not yet. He's fallen because of serious questions about his knee. May need Microfracture surgery.

Still hear Buffalo may take him at 34.

cdewar19

 

Joined: Mon Feb 22nd, 2010
Location: In The Ruins Of CanadInns Stadium, Manitoba Canada
Posts: 1621
Status: 
Offline
Locker at #8 still has me scratching my head. Tennessee picked the white Vince Young to replace Vince Young. Ponder went too high at #12, but I think he turns out to be the best QB of the bunch. Strong arm, accurate passer, has mobility, and is very smart.

BruiserBrodyMania



Joined: Tue Jul 27th, 2010
Location:  Monsters Of The Midway
Posts: 871
Status: 
Offline
cdewar19 wrote: Locker at #8 still has me scratching my head. Tennessee picked the white Vince Young to replace Vince Young. Ponder went too high at #12, but I think he turns out to be the best QB of the bunch. Strong arm, accurate passer, has mobility, and is very smart.
I was surprised that Locker went ahead of Gabbert. Yeah Ponder was a reach. I guess the Vikings panicked with all the QB's coming off the board.

freebirdsforever2001
Fantasia is running wild!


Joined: Tue Jul 8th, 2008
Location: Pittsgrove, New Jersey USA
Posts: 20758
Status: 
Offline
nyhack56 wrote: LOL Mark Ingram looks exactly like Ice Cube.
I'm very surprised that New England didn't go after Ingram. They could use a decent RB.

freebirdsforever2001
Fantasia is running wild!


Joined: Tue Jul 8th, 2008
Location: Pittsgrove, New Jersey USA
Posts: 20758
Status: 
Offline
JB5 wrote: khawk wrote: Did that Bowers kid get drafted? It seemed to come off the to the analysts as surprising that he didn't go early in the draft, and by glancing quickly here I didn't see his name listed.


Not yet. He's fallen because of serious questions about his knee. May need Microfracture surgery.

Still hear Buffalo may take him at 34.

Heard that His career may only last 3-4 years because of His Knee.

freebirdsforever2001
Fantasia is running wild!


Joined: Tue Jul 8th, 2008
Location: Pittsgrove, New Jersey USA
Posts: 20758
Status: 
Offline
Papa Voo wrote: Not too much out of the ordinary in the First Round of the NFL Draft in 2011.  There were no major reaches like we usually see from teams like the Raiders or the Browns.  That's right.....Oakland did not have a First Round pick this year. LOL 

Any thoughts?

What did you think of your team's picks?

We should see a pretty deep 2nd and 3rd rounds this year. 

Not as fun as it should've been because of the labor dispute. I usually watch the entire draft, but this is the 1st year in recent memory in which I could care less about it. Alot of trades didn't go down because of not being able to trade current players.

freebirdsforever2001
Fantasia is running wild!


Joined: Tue Jul 8th, 2008
Location: Pittsgrove, New Jersey USA
Posts: 20758
Status: 
Offline
Papa Voo wrote: That Falcons trade with Cleveland still has me scratching my head.

 

The Falcons swapped their First Round pick with the Brownies. They went from the 27th pick to the 6th pick.

The Falcons also surrendered this year's Second Round pick and this year's Fourth Round pick.

Then, they also give Cleveland their First Round and Fourth Round picks next year.

 

That seems like a little much for Julio Jones.  He was not even considered the best receiver in the Draft, but maybe the Falcons have better information, and he becomes one of the top receivers in the league.

Mike Holmgren schooled the Falcons on this. The Browns have alot of options for the next several years due to this trade.

freebirdsforever2001
Fantasia is running wild!


Joined: Tue Jul 8th, 2008
Location: Pittsgrove, New Jersey USA
Posts: 20758
Status: 
Offline
I think the Giants got the best value in the draft with Prince Amukamara. Very good pick by the G-Men.

clawmaster
Hall Of Famer
 

Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: The Bowels Of East Central Illinois
Posts: 48216
Status: 
Offline
freebirdsforever2001 wrote: I think the Giants got the best value in the draft with Prince Amukamara. Very good pick by the G-Men.
Short arms like Chris Benoit. Giants might have drafted a murderer. :tongue:

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
A little late getting started, but I was going to bunch the picks together anyway. 

33. NE - Ras-I Dowling, CB, Virginia

34. Buffalo – Aaron Williams, CB, Texas

35. Cincy – Andy Dalton, QB, TCU

36. San Fran – Colin Kaepernick, QB, Nevada

37. Cleveland – Jabaal Sheard, DE, Pittsburgh

38. Arizona – Ryan Williams, RB, Virginia Tech

39. Tennessee – Akeem Ayers, OLB, UCLA

40. Dallas – Bruce Carter, OLB, North Carolina

41. Wash – Jarvis Jenkins, DT, Clemson

42. Houston – Brooks Reed, OLB, Arizona

43. Minn – Kyle Rudolph, TE, Notre Dame

44. Detroit – Titus Young, WR, Boise St.

45. Denver – Rahim Moore, FS, UCLA

46. Denver – Orlando Franklin, OT, Miami (FLA)

47. St. Louis – Lance Kendricks, TE, Wisconsin

48. Oakland – Stefen Wisniewski, C, Penn St.


 

NE came out swinging  with the selection of CB Ras-I Dowling.  Dowling's stock was raising at a rapid rate.  

Cleveland is another team that seems to be attempting to build a solid foundation with a strong defense.  Jabaal Sheard is underrated to me; he may turn into a real force in the NFL.  Even though I do not like the Stains, so far, it has been a good draft for "Big Baby" Holmgren.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Dowling had high interest from the Steelers and the Lions, but it was Beli-cheat who came out as the winner in that sweepstakes.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Colts building that line of protection around "Golden Boy" Peyton with two OTs with the first two picks:

Anthony Castonzo, OT (1st pick)


Ben Ijalana, OT, Villanova (2nd pick)

Last edited on Sat Apr 30th, 2011 12:47 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
49. Indy – Ben Ijalana, OT, Villanova

50. SD - Marcus Gilchrist, CB, Clemson

51. Tampa - Da’Quan Bowers, DE, Clemson

52. Giants - Marvin Austin, DT, North Carolina

53. Chicago - Stephen Paea, DT, Oregon St.

54. Philly - Jaiquawn Jarrett, FS, Temple

 

 

Tampa decided to roll the dice with Da'Quan Bowers and his suspicious knee.  It is going to be boom or bust.  For a 2nd Round pick, unless the latest medical reports were catastrophic, I would take the risk on him. 

 

I really like Philly pick of Jarrett.  I think this is a good steady defender who needs to improve on his cover skills and techniques, but he will fit in well playing the run and blitzes for the Iggles.

BruiserBrodyMania



Joined: Tue Jul 27th, 2010
Location:  Monsters Of The Midway
Posts: 871
Status: 
Offline
Awesome man that the Bears got Stephen Paea. The 2 guys I wanted the Bears to get they got so far. I didn't think Paea would be around that long to fall to them.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
BruiserBrodyMania wrote: Awesome man that the Bears got Stephen Paea. The 2 guys I wanted the Bears to get they got so far. I didn't think Paea would be around that long to fall to them.


 With Tommie Harris gone, this looks a very good pick. 

 

Pass rush: Doesn't provide much in terms of a pass rush. Is able to split gaps due to his burst off the snap, but doesn't have quick feet or agility to chase down the quarterback. Relies on his bull rush to knock interior linemen into the pocket and flush the passer into the arms of teammates. Lacks the height and arm length required in consistently altering passing lanes.


Run defense: Is quick enough to surprise his opponent with a burst through the gap, but will make his NFL millions due to the fact that he is a natural run plugger due to his short, squatty build and rare upper- and lower-body strength. Can be knocked off the ball when double-teamed, but flashes the ability to split them and is rarely pushed far before he's able to plant his legs in the ground and create a pile. Doesn't have the lateral agility and balance to beat runners to the sideline, but hustles in pursuit.


Explosion: Fires off the snap low and hard, flashing a sudden burst that surprises opponents. Burst is short-lived and only extends to his ability to go straight upfield. With his strength and bowling ball-like frame, Paea can explode into the ballcarrier if he gets a running start.


Strength: Ranks as one of the country's strongest players, reportedly boasting a 600-pound squat, 500-pound bench press and the ability to churn out 44 repetitions of 225 pounds. Is even stronger than his weight-room numbers indicate due to his natural leverage. Doesn't disengage from blockers as well as his strength would indicate due to the need to refine his hand technique and average lateral agility.


Tackling: Stays squared and low to knock down the ballcarrier near the line of scrimmage. Flashes explosive hitting ability, with a proven ability to knock the ball free. Tied the OSU record with four forced fumbles in 2009. Good upper-body strength to drag down ballcarriers as they attempt to go past him. Doesn't have the speed or change of direction to offer much in pursuit.


Intangibles: High-effort player was voted a team co-captain in 2009, in his second year in the program as a junior. Proved his toughness in 2008 by playing the final month of the regular season despite a painful bursa sac injury in his knee. Born in New Zealand, grew up in Tonga and dreamt of becoming a professional rugby player. Learned the English language after moving to the United States at age 16.


Last edited on Sat Apr 30th, 2011 01:21 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
55. KC - Rodney Hudson, C, Florida St.

56. NE - Shane Vereen, RB, Calfornia

57. DET - Mikel LeShoure, RB, Illinois

58. Baltimore - Torrey Smith, WR, Maryland

59. Cleveland - Greg Little, WR, Cleveland

60. Houston - Brandon Harris, CB, Miami (FLA)

61. SD - Jonas Mouton, OLB, Michigan

 

 

There are some interesting picks in this group.

 

Hudson should become an anchor for KC at the center position.

 

NE's pick of Vereen seems to be heir apparent for Kevin Faulk.  Not a short yardage or grinder type of RB, but the guy loves catching passes out of the backfield.  Another young weapon for Tommy boy, especially on 3rd down.

 

Detroit got their big bell-ringer for a running back to compliment Best in the backfield.  Nothing fancy, but LeShoure is strong and does not go down easily.

 

The Shitbirds (Ravens) infused some speed to their wide receiving corps with Torrey Smith.  He compares to Mike Wallace of the Steelers. The guy is not a great route-runner but he can turn on the jets and fly.

 

Cleveland goes for WR Greg Little, a 230 lbs. WR. Very raw, but the guy has natural athletic abilities.  Some character issues are there, also.  If he turns it around, he could be a player like Anquan Boldin.

 

Last edited on Sat Apr 30th, 2011 01:36 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
62. Miami – Daniel Thomas, RB, Kansas St.

63. Pittsburgh – Marcus Gilbert, OT, Florida

64. Green Bay – Randall Cobb, WR, Kentucky

 

 

These are the final three picks for the 2nd Round of the NFL Draft.

 

I think the only intriguing pick is Green Bay's selection of WR Randall Cobb. I thought he was a very talented receiver and that he would have been drafted earlier in the round. 

 

Not too thrilled with the Steelers pick of OT Marcus Gilbert.  Guy has alot of negatives...inconsistent and plays soft.   They will need to put a fire under his big ass, if he is going to contribute.

 

 

End of Round 2

 

 

I will not posting all picks as they occur, maybe quick run-down after each round.

 

Feel free to post your opinions, your excitement, your frustrations, etc.  as the rounds go by.

 

Last edited on Sat Apr 30th, 2011 04:46 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
In Round 3, the NE Patsies select Ryan Mallett, QB, Arkansas.

Is he the Chosen One to learn from the Great Tom and carry the torch for the Patriots into it's next era of winning and cheating in the NFL? 



Ryan Mallett


Accuracy: Flashes very good accuracy on short and intermediate throws. Consistently hits the receiver in stride on crossing routes, slants and post patterns. Shows good touch and ball placement for the fade route. Throws with a flat trajectory on deep routes, showing only moderate accuracy on deep throws overall. Can make the "wow" throw and there isn't an NFL route he can't hit. Accuracy nosedives, however, when he is forced to move his feet, as his long legs prevent him from re-setting quickly and he throws with just his arm. When his feet aren't set, Mallett whips the ball, leading to passes sailing high and others diving low, making his throws difficult for receivers to predict or track and set up for yardage after the catch.


Arm Strength: Mallett's greatest trait. Possesses as strong an arm as there is in the country. Can fit the ball through closing windows, making him capable of completing throws most cannot. Drives the ball on the deep out and can zip the back shoulder throw against tight coverage. Has a tendency to get overly confident with his arm and will attempt to make ill-advised throws into coverage. Has learned to take some speed off when needed.


Setup/Release: Takes most of his snaps out of the shotgun, though he has shown the ability to drop back from center. Gains depth due to the length of his gait rather than foot quickness. Though his long arm makes for an awkward-looking windup, Mallett possesses a fluid, over-the-top release that generates momentum, resulting in the ball exploding out of his hand. Steps into his throws when he has room in the pocket, but loses accuracy when forced to rely solely on his arm.


Reading Defenses: Excellent height to see over the top of his linemen and read defenses. Good field vision, showing the ability to check down from his first and second options to drop passes off to outlet receivers. Flashes the ability to look off the safety, but most do this more consistently. Generally reads the blitz coming and can make defenses pay for their aggression by hitting the hot route, but doesn't possess the athleticism to escape the pocket when he is surprised.


On the Move: Can slide laterally to avoid the rush. Improved significantly as a junior in stepping up in the pocket to buy time. Willing to take a big hit to complete the pass. Has heavy feet and long legs, however, causing him to take longer than most to set his feet and throw accurately when forced to vacate the pocket. Threw critical interceptions late against Alabama and Ohio State in the Sugar Bowl when this occurred. Willing to tuck the ball and run when he's given a free lane and has exhausted his throwing options, but is no danger to consistently gain yardage as a scrambler. Doesn't get low enough or show more than average leg drive for the QB sneak.


Intangibles: Some have concerns over his maturity level. Has a brash personality that has caused some to question whether he possesses the leadership to handle an NFL huddle. Was never voted a team captain with the Razorbacks despite the fact that quarterbacks are often pushed by coaching staffs as such. Very confident in his own talent and early in his career wasn't known for his dedication to the film room. Arrested for public intoxication on March 1, 2009, in Fayetteville.


Compares to: Derek Anderson, Cardinals -- No one questions Mallett's ability to throw a football; he's the most talented pure passer in this draft. But he's tall and lanky and lacks any real mobility. If protected by a strong offensive line, he could turn out to be more like Drew Bledsoe or Joe Flacco.



Will Mallett be the prized venture of super models, actresses and princesses from all over the world?  Can he fulfill the role of Sir Tom in Foxboro?  Would a man like Ted Bruschi lay his life down for Mallett?  Stay tuned.

Last edited on Sat Apr 30th, 2011 04:45 am by Papa Voo

clawmaster
Hall Of Famer
 

Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: The Bowels Of East Central Illinois
Posts: 48216
Status: 
Offline
Fascinating QB pick by the Pats.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
Here is an article on the winners and losers of the 2011 NFL Draft.

 
2011 NFL Draft: Winners and Losers

 

Posted on: April 30, 2011 8:10 pm

Posted by Will Brinson

 
NEW YORK -- The grind of the NFL Draft -- and don't let anyone tell you otherwise, three days of straight picks is definitely a grind -- is finally over. Which means we should probably take our time to sit back and reflect on who did well and do not do well. Or, alternately, we can just start calling people names right ... now!

 
WINNERS 

Atlanta Falcons: Been flopping on these guys all weekend long it feels like -- I like Julio Jones a lot, but I didn’t like all the picks the Falcons needed to get him. I do, however, freaking LOVE Jacquizz Rodgers. They got a steal when they landed a lot more offensive explosiveness in the seventh round. Couple that with a few more solid adds in Andrew Jackson, Akeem Dent and K/P Matt Bosher and it was a good haul for Thomas Dimitroff. Good enough to have me thinking about picking them to win it all. Again.

 
Peyton Manning: Not only is the best quarterback in the NFL going to get real paid as soon as we get a new CBA, but he’s going to have two new guys -- Anthony Castonzo and Benjamin Ijalana -- in town to help keep him healthy. 

 Buffalo Bills: The Bills started off their draft with a good blueprint: DEFENSE. And they stuck to that blueprint throughout the rest of the draft too, only diverting twice to pick up Chris Hairston from Clemson to beef up the offensive line and Johnny White for backfield depth and special teams. Da’Norris Searcy out of Chapel Hill could be a steal for them in the fourth. 

Wade Phillips: Not that you expected the Texans to actually go out and get anyone that’s an an offensive player early in the draft, but did a great job with their first five picks, particularly in trading back up to grab Brandon Harris. Given all the limitations on that defense and the switch they have to make, it’s good for him to at least get a head start out of the draft.

 
Cleveland Browns: Giving up a top-10 selection when you’ve got a young quarterback that needs weapons is no easy move ... unless you’re getting five picks in return and turn those into serviceable offensive products and some defensive standouts. Buster Skrine’s value fell post-Combine but he could be a good find, Jason Pinkston out of Pittsburgh will help and already-physical offensive line. Phil Taylor/Jabaal Sheard immediately improve the defensive line and Greg Little and Jordan Cameron give Colt McCoy some guys with good hands and upside. 

 
Ryan Mallett: My man Freeman thinks Bill Belichick might have taken too big a gamble, and there’s a good chance he might be right. But if Mallett goes anywhere else, you would have heard everyone saying that about the GM that grabbed him. (Can you imagine the reaction if Carolina took him or, dare I say, the Bengals?) The pressure of falling in the draft because of character issues and having to play/perform well at an early time is lifted with his move. 

 
Green Bay Packers: Not that it’s hard to “win” if you’re Green Bay, coming off a Super Bowl-winning season and sitting on a young, stacked roster. But “In Ted We Trust” applies here, because Thompson beefed up the Packers’ offensive line depth, got a superb second-rounder in Randall Cobb to potentially replace and just generally marked everything he needed off his checklist. Standard Packers draft, really. 

 
Arizona Cardinals: They had a good first two days nabbing Patrick Peterson and Ryan Williams and then fared quite well in the later rounds, particularly with their selection of Quan Sturdivant, a pretty stupendous value in the sixth round. Some would argue they didn’t address their QB need and that’s fair, but they’ll be the leaders in the clubhouse for a veteran or a Kevin Kolb trade. 

 
Pittsburgh Steelers: The rich get richer, per usual. Cameron Heyward is the future at defensive end, Marcus Gilbert -- a reliable offensive lineman -- is exactly what the Steelers need, and the Steelers stepped up and addressed their cornerback issues early on Day 3 of the draft by grabbing Curtis Brown and Cortez Allen. 

 
America: For awesomeness’ sake, I’m going to hold out eternal hope that the Chiefs win the Super Bowl, Ricky Stanzi ends up shirtless in a downtown BBQ joint with an American flag as a cape, holding a huge turkey leg while belting out the “Star Spangled Banner” in celebration and this scene makes its way onto YouTube. America needs that. 

 

LOSERS

 
Carolina Panthers: The Panthers were a classic example of how trading early-round picks and finding yourself extremely weak at certain positions can kill you: in a draft with ridiculous defensive line depth, they still couldn’t add to a weak position until the third round when they picked up a pair of undersized defensive tackles in Terrell McClain and Sione Fua. Kealoha Pilares was a good grab at the top of the fifth, though. And, of course, they were essentially forced to take Cam Newton at the top spot. If he busts, this draft is a total nightmare. It might even be a situation of Carolina just taking their medicine in the best-case anyway.

 
Carson Palmer: Marvin Lewis says the Bengals have “moved on” for Palmer too; you gotta think they’ll try and trade him just to get something in return, but it’s shame because the best scenario for him might actually be returning to the ‘Nati and helping to bring A.J. Green and Stanford product Ryan Whalen into the fold of Jermaine Gresham and Jordan Shipley. Those are nicer weapons than he’ll find in retirement.

 
Jacksonville Jaguars: I think Blaine Gabbert will end up being pretty good. If he’s great, this ranking could change, but if Jack Del Rio’s job is on the line, how does he not convince Gene Smith to go out and get him some freaking secondary help before fourth round? 

Ronnie Brown: There was some talk Brown might stick with the Dolphins even after they took Daniel Thomas out of K-State in the second round. Nabbing Charles Clay -- even if he’s a fullback -- probably means Brown is done with the ‘Fins. (And it might also mean they’re not as set on paying DeAngelo Williams whatever he wants too.) 

Washington Redskins: All weekend long, the Redskins looked like winners as they kept avoiding making huge mistakes by trading down and piling up picks. But did they really end up getting anything of substantial value for it? Leonard Hankerson could be a nice pull in the third round, certainly, but for all the Redskins’ surprising patience, they didn’t once address their (very serious) quarterback issue or outside linebacker issue. 

Reggie Bush: Sean Payton’s saying that he’s open to Bush coming back. That might be true. And it might not be true. But what he’s not doing is making a dumb, knee-jerk reaction on Twitter simply because his team drafted Mark Ingram. Which is what Bush did and it’s not going to help him in the short or long term. 

 Denver Broncos: The Broncos accumulated a lot of picks, and added a linebacker trio that could be dominant in a few years (Von Miller as the pass rusher, Nate Irving as the tackler and Virgil Green as the cover guy). But two tight ends and not a single defensive lineman? Did someone show John Elway the wrong depth chart before this thing kicked off on Thursday? 

 Oakland Raiders: Al Davis didn’t have a first-rounder, so it’s okay to temper expectations a little bit, but Al really isn’t going to stop over-drafting athleticism until the day he dies. And considering how hot it was in Radio City Music Hall when they played “California Girls” for the second time on Saturday, I can’t imagine hell’s freezing over any time soon. 

 David Akers: With the Eagles’ decision to reach up into the fourth round and grab Alex Henery out of Nebraska, as well as the fact that Akers wasn’t happy about his transition tag, it’s pretty obvious that the incumbent kicker’s days as a Philly legend are numbered. (You could also add Henery as a loser here, too: having to come in and kick in front of Eagles’ fans sounds worse than listening to drunk Jets’ fans boo everything for eight-straight hours.) 

Seattle Seahawks: Maybe Pete Carroll’s drafts are just too “zany” for me to understand, but the James Carpenter pick strikes me as possibly the biggest reach of the first round, maybe even ahead of Jake Locker and Christian Ponder. Unless bring Matt Hasselbeck back or land another veteran QB in the offseason, it’s almost impossible to imagine them sniffing the playoffs again.

 

 

Last edited on Sun May 1st, 2011 03:31 am by Papa Voo

Benlen



Joined: Sun Oct 21st, 2007
Location: Milpitas, California USA
Posts: 13280
Status: 
Offline
Papa Voo wrote:
Atlanta Falcons: Been flopping on these guys all weekend long it feels like -- I like Julio Jones a lot, but I didn’t like all the picks the Falcons needed to get him. I do, however, freaking LOVE Jacquizz Rodgers.



I will disagree with this. Rodgers is a midget and will be nothing more but a return man. Falcons defense still not top notch.

Lions front 4 will be awesome.

Hammer to Fall



Joined: Wed Nov 7th, 2007
Location: Near An Enigma
Posts: 1860
Status: 
Offline
Benlen wrote:

I will disagree with this. Rodgers is a midget and will be nothing more but a return man. Falcons defense still not top notch.


No, he'll actually get some carries as Jerious Norwood hasn't even come close to what the Falcons wanted him to be. That doesn't mean Rodgers will be any good, though.

It's about time for Atlanta to slide back to where they've always been.

clawmaster
Hall Of Famer
 

Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: The Bowels Of East Central Illinois
Posts: 48216
Status: 
Offline
I agree about the Lions front four but their future still depends on the health of QB Stafford.

Bears drafted by need. OT, DT, S. Whether the guys they picked are any good, we shall see.



 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline
I really liked the Giants draft.  Reese is a personnel guy, and he makes a lot of good decisions on draft day.

We really lucked out that Prince Amukamara dropped to us.  I would've loved to take Ingram, but you cannot pass up a guy that really could be a shut down corner.

Marvin Austin is a beast.  Both the NFL Network and ESPN touted him as having 1st round talent.  I know he got into trouble in college, but if he can be as good as advertised, I don't mind the Giants taking a chance on him.  Hopefully he comes in with a chip on his shoulder and helps shore up the interior run defense.

Jerrel Jernigan is really fast.  He won Troy's bowl game last year all by himself.  He's small and won't be an every down player, but he has a lot of intangibles, can play wildcat QB, can line up in the backfield, in the slot, has experience at RB and WR, and could really improve our dismal return game.

Greg Jones is a productive LB with experience at the Mike and the Sam.  I'd like to see how well he covers the TE/slot WR.
 

 

Last edited on Sun May 1st, 2011 07:46 pm by

HBF



Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location: Atlanta, Georgia USA
Posts: 17866
Status: 
Offline
nyhack56 wrote:
I really liked the Giants draft.  Reese is a personnel guy, and he makes a lot of good decisions on draft day.

We really lucked out that Prince Amukamara dropped to us.  I would've loved to take Ingram, but you cannot pass up a guy that really could be a shut down corner.

Marvin Austin is a beast.  Both the NFL Network and ESPN touted him as having 1st round talent.  I know he got into trouble in college, but if he can be as good as advertised, I don't mind the Giants taking a chance on him.  Hopefully he comes in with a chip on his shoulder and helps shore up the interior run defense.

Jerrel Jernigan is really fast.  He won Troy's bowl game last year all by himself.  He's small and won't be an every down player, but he has a lot of intangibles, can play wildcat QB, can line up in the backfield, in the slot, has experience at RB and WR, and could really improve our dismal return game.

Greg Jones is a productive LB with experience at the Mike and the Sam.  I'd like to see how well he covers the TE/slot WR.
 

 



I liked the picks too. They didn't fill the OL and LB needs but the mantra is to take the best players. The S Sash that they took was somebody the analysts at ESPN were really high on. We'll see.

stone2k



Joined: Mon Nov 29th, 2010
Location: Cambridge, Massachusetts USA
Posts: 8946
Status: 
Offline
Good job Papa Voo... I enjoyed your posts on the draft.



 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline
HBF wrote: nyhack56 wrote:
I really liked the Giants draft.  Reese is a personnel guy, and he makes a lot of good decisions on draft day.

We really lucked out that Prince Amukamara dropped to us.  I would've loved to take Ingram, but you cannot pass up a guy that really could be a shut down corner.

Marvin Austin is a beast.  Both the NFL Network and ESPN touted him as having 1st round talent.  I know he got into trouble in college, but if he can be as good as advertised, I don't mind the Giants taking a chance on him.  Hopefully he comes in with a chip on his shoulder and helps shore up the interior run defense.

Jerrel Jernigan is really fast.  He won Troy's bowl game last year all by himself.  He's small and won't be an every down player, but he has a lot of intangibles, can play wildcat QB, can line up in the backfield, in the slot, has experience at RB and WR, and could really improve our dismal return game.

Greg Jones is a productive LB with experience at the Mike and the Sam.  I'd like to see how well he covers the TE/slot WR.
 

 



I liked the picks too. They didn't fill the OL and LB needs but the mantra is to take the best players. The S Sash that they took was somebody the analysts at ESPN were really high on. We'll see.


This wasn't a deep LB draft.  Greg Jones looks like he could turn into a good LB.  The other guy is a special teamer.

I think they are waiting for FA to begin (if ever) and they may go after Steven Tulloch from the Titans.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9688
Status: 
Offline
See you all next year.   By the way, most of the feedback that I have seen or heard indicates that fans are not liking this new three-day format.  I would like to see it be put back to the weekend, but you know the NFL needs to make their money. :D

krazykid18

 

Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location:  
Posts: 1789
Status: 
Offline
LOL@ all the idiots who grade drafts and look @ there schedule and tell you how good a team's season will be. No wonder Kiper/Mayock/McShay don't ever do a draft grade after the season because they will be out of a job very quick for being wrong every yr.



 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline
krazykid18 wrote: LOL@ all the idiots who grade drafts and look @ there schedule and tell you how good a team's season will be. No wonder Kiper/Mayock/McShay don't ever do a draft grade after the season because they will be out of a job very quick for being wrong every yr.


I agree with that.  You can't tell what you're schedule is going to be like because you don't know how good your opponents are going to be.

As for the draft, everything is upside.  There's no guarantees, I  know that.  However, I do put some stock in scouting reports by guys like Mayock.  It gives you some hope and something to look forward to because these guys get paid to do their homework and report on these players.  I also have faith the my team's GM.  31 players of the Giants 53 man roster are their draft picks, and they exactly haven't had terrible seasons in the past 3 years.

krazykid18

 

Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location:  
Posts: 1789
Status: 
Offline
nyhack56 wrote: krazykid18 wrote: LOL@ all the idiots who grade drafts and look @ there schedule and tell you how good a team's season will be. No wonder Kiper/Mayock/McShay don't ever do a draft grade after the season because they will be out of a job very quick for being wrong every yr.


I agree with that.  You can't tell what you're schedule is going to be like because you don't know how good your opponents are going to be.

As for the draft, everything is upside.  There's no guarantees, I  know that.  However, I do put some stock in scouting reports by guys like Mayock.  It gives you some hope and something to look forward to because these guys get paid to do their homework and report on these players.  I also have faith the my team's GM.  31 players of the Giants 53 man roster are their draft picks, and they exactly haven't had terrible seasons in the past 3 years.

I agree with everything you said but i would like kiper and the rest of these guys to do a how well was my predictions recap after the season, so we can value their thoughts much more

HBF



Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location: Atlanta, Georgia USA
Posts: 17866
Status: 
Offline
krazykid18 wrote:
nyhack56 wrote: krazykid18 wrote: LOL@ all the idiots who grade drafts and look @ there schedule and tell you how good a team's season will be. No wonder Kiper/Mayock/McShay don't ever do a draft grade after the season because they will be out of a job very quick for being wrong every yr.


I agree with that.  You can't tell what you're schedule is going to be like because you don't know how good your opponents are going to be.

As for the draft, everything is upside.  There's no guarantees, I  know that.  However, I do put some stock in scouting reports by guys like Mayock.  It gives you some hope and something to look forward to because these guys get paid to do their homework and report on these players.  I also have faith the my team's GM.  31 players of the Giants 53 man roster are their draft picks, and they exactly haven't had terrible seasons in the past 3 years.

I agree with everything you said but i would like kiper and the rest of these guys to do a how well was my predictions recap after the season, so we can value their thoughts much more


KK-I agree about the "experts" too. But I do like Maycock. And man, I am so glad that Reese has done well with picks. Remember the 90's and Cedric Jones?



 

Joined: 
Location:  
Posts: 
Status: 
Offline
HBF wrote: krazykid18 wrote:
nyhack56 wrote: krazykid18 wrote: LOL@ all the idiots who grade drafts and look @ there schedule and tell you how good a team's season will be. No wonder Kiper/Mayock/McShay don't ever do a draft grade after the season because they will be out of a job very quick for being wrong every yr.


I agree with that.  You can't tell what you're schedule is going to be like because you don't know how good your opponents are going to be.

As for the draft, everything is upside.  There's no guarantees, I  know that.  However, I do put some stock in scouting reports by guys like Mayock.  It gives you some hope and something to look forward to because these guys get paid to do their homework and report on these players.  I also have faith the my team's GM.  31 players of the Giants 53 man roster are their draft picks, and they exactly haven't had terrible seasons in the past 3 years.

I agree with everything you said but i would like kiper and the rest of these guys to do a how well was my predictions recap after the season, so we can value their thoughts much more


KK-I agree about the "experts" too. But I do like Maycock. And man, I am so glad that Reese has done well with picks. Remember the 90's and Cedric Jones?


Yeah, and Thomas Lewis and Tyrone Wheatley.

Lots of 1st rd misses in those mid 90s drafts.

That 96 draft sucked.  The Giants had like the 6th or 7th pick, and coveted 5 or 6 different guys, and they all got taken right in a row right before they picked, so they drafted a half-blind DE.

HBF



Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location: Atlanta, Georgia USA
Posts: 17866
Status: 
Offline
nyhack56 wrote:
HBF wrote: krazykid18 wrote:
nyhack56 wrote: krazykid18 wrote: LOL@ all the idiots who grade drafts and look @ there schedule and tell you how good a team's season will be. No wonder Kiper/Mayock/McShay don't ever do a draft grade after the season because they will be out of a job very quick for being wrong every yr.


I agree with that.  You can't tell what you're schedule is going to be like because you don't know how good your opponents are going to be.

As for the draft, everything is upside.  There's no guarantees, I  know that.  However, I do put some stock in scouting reports by guys like Mayock.  It gives you some hope and something to look forward to because these guys get paid to do their homework and report on these players.  I also have faith the my team's GM.  31 players of the Giants 53 man roster are their draft picks, and they exactly haven't had terrible seasons in the past 3 years.

I agree with everything you said but i would like kiper and the rest of these guys to do a how well was my predictions recap after the season, so we can value their thoughts much more


KK-I agree about the "experts" too. But I do like Maycock. And man, I am so glad that Reese has done well with picks. Remember the 90's and Cedric Jones?


Yeah, and Thomas Lewis and Tyrone Wheatley.

Lots of 1st rd misses in those mid 90s drafts.

That 96 draft sucked.  The Giants had like the 6th or 7th pick, and coveted 5 or 6 different guys, and they all got taken right in a row right before they picked, so they drafted a half-blind DE.


Ray Lewis went 28th to the Ravens.

CanadianHorseman



Joined: Fri Nov 2nd, 2007
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia Canada
Posts: 14026
Status: 
Offline
Check out how the " experts " graded your team's draft.



from realclearsports:

Now that the NFL Draft is over we can't spend hours pouring over various mock drafts, but we can look back at the draft and assess how teams have done. Nearly every sports website comes out with their own version of draft grades, so took it upon ourselves to average them all out to come up with a comprehensive draft report card. Opinions are widely varied (and one could argue fairly irrelevant as we won't have any real idea until a few seasons down the line) from site to site.

The RCS Grade Averages were calculated like a standard GPA (4.0 for an A, 3.7 for an A-, 3.3 for a B+, 3.0 for a B, 2.7 for a B-, etc.). USA Today decided to take the easy way out with any team that picked a QB high in the draft by giving them an incomplete. The incomplete grades were not factored into the team's GPA.






The Ultimate Sin
Hall Of Famer


Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location: Parts Unknown, Sri Lanka
Posts: 9860
Status: 
Offline
Sweet my 2 favorite teams were graded #1 and #2.

stone2k



Joined: Mon Nov 29th, 2010
Location: Cambridge, Massachusetts USA
Posts: 8946
Status: 
Offline
The Patriots are the only team who had an "A+" and a "D"

clawmaster
Hall Of Famer
 

Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: The Bowels Of East Central Illinois
Posts: 48216
Status: 
Offline
The Bears ranged from A minus to F. :tongue:

beejmi
The Big Kahuna


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Philly
Posts: 41572
Status: 
Offline
Love "the chart" (thanks for posting that actually) ~ I'm amused that teams will tell you that it takes a couple YEARS to grade whether a certain draft was successful and we have writers assigning grades a couple DAYS after it happens.



UltraBB 1.172 Copyright © 2007-2013 Data 1 Systems