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srossi

 

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Haven't had a good book thread in 6 months to a year.  I've been going through about a book a week. 

Just finished reading an anthology of the four main Sherlock Holmes novels that make up the primary canon: "A Study in Scarlet" (1887), "The Sign of the Four" (1890), "The Hound of the Baskervilles" (1901), and "The Valley of Fear" (1914).  Excellent reads and so different and more clever than these stupid Robert Downey, Jr. movies. 

Now I'm finally getting around to reading Steven Adler's autobiography. 

Next up will be a biography on Eisenhower.  I'm not sure where I'll go from there but looking for any good fiction or non-fiction suggestions.

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Currently I am reading Stephen Kings "The Green Mile" a book I last read back in 1999 or 2000.

Before that, I read his bachman book version of "The Running Man"

After the Green Mile, I am going to be reading Huckleberry Finn

I love having an e-reader, I have over 1000 books on that thing right now

carpetbeggar
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Just finished two highly regarded apocolyptic horror type novels the last couple days. Yesterday it was 'The Bridge' by Jon Skipp and Craig Spector from 1991 which is a 'splatterpunk' genre book in the environmental apocalypse vein.
The day before it was Colson Whitehead's new book 'Zone One' set in Manhattan during the 'reconstruction' era, early after a zombie apocalypse.
Now I'm reading Tom Clancy's 'The Cardinal Of The Kremlin' again. I've sort of burnt myself out on non-fiction about two years ago and having been reading a lot of fiction since then. I've still got quite a pile of books here to read still. I'll probably get into Keith Richards' autobiography here over the holidays, which I've been putting off for a year now and then then go into some classic literature I have laying around.

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Duff Mckagans new book.
Read Steven Adlers earlier this year.

Was in the middle of Raging Bull on Jake Lamotta's life story (he is such a bastard), when the Duff book came (i get them all from the library).

Up next, I am going to attempt Game of Thrones, but I think it may take too long, haha.

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carpetbeggar wrote: Now I'm reading Tom Clancy's 'The Cardinal Of The Kremlin' again
Are you going to read the Clancy John Ryan books in order?

I loved that book(Cardinal), and I think that is the best John Ryan novel Clancy did, with Debt of Honor and Executive Orders close 2nd and 3rd

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I stick to the "Dungeons and Dragons" settings novels (Forgotten Realms, Ravenloft, Dragonlance).  I've split up my collection between my girl's house and my place.

At my house, when I'm getting ready for bed, I'm re-reading "Once around the Realms" by Brian Thomsen and down here I'm reading "I, Strahd: The War against Azalin" by P.N. Elrod

srossi

 

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the squared circle wrote: Up next, I am going to attempt Game of Thrones, but I think it may take too long, haha.

I wanted to read that too but when I was a kid I started to read the Wheel of Time series and over the course of 15+ years I couldn't remember what happened in one book by the time I got to the next, and I eventually gave up on it.  Then recently the author Robert Jordan died before he finished it!  I think someone else is wrapping it up.  That experience turned me off of those types of never-ending fantasy series.  But I did have the first edition hardcovers of most of those books and sold them on eBay a number of years ago for quite a lot of money.

Last edited on Fri Dec 16th, 2011 04:00 pm by srossi

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I am making my way through The Walking Dead trades and I have recently started reading a lot more comics after the DC New 52 reboot. I plan on reading the new Stephen King book in the near future.

srossi

 

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the squared circle wrote: Duff Mckagans new book.
Read Steven Adlers earlier this year.

Duff's is a lot better than Adler's.

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Finishing PJ O'Rourke's "Don't Vote, it just Encourages the Bastards".  Cynicl commentary on modern politics.   If you like O'Rourke, you'll love this, but it is a good read by any standard.

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thunderbolt wrote: Finishing PJ O'Rourke's "Don't Vote, it just Encourages the Bastards".  Cynicl commentary on modern politics.   If you like O'Rourke, you'll love this, but it is a good read by any standard.

I'm a big O'Rourke fan.  I'll have to check that out.

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About to read Edge by Jeffery Deaver. The best book I've read in the last 6 months is the Help by Kathryn Stockett. I usually stick to thrillers/mysteries but my Sister gave me The Help and that book was tremendous.

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clawmaster wrote: About to read Edge by Jeffery Deaver. The best book I've read in the last 6 months is the Help by Kathryn Stockett. I usually stick to thrillers/mysteries but my Sister gave me The Help and that book was tremendous.

I just saw the movie and it was good but I doubt I'll go back and read the book.

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About to finish The Great Silence (Juliet Nicolson), which is about reaction in England at the end of World War I and a few years after. Solid, but not compelling. If you ever watched the old Upstairs, Downstairs series, it's the same thing but less interesting.

Since I rarely read very new releases, the best books I've read this year are a little dated. All are non-fiction.

- Nixonland (Rick Perlstein). Cultural history, plus a lot of Nixon from the 1940s through the beginning of Watergate.

- There Goes My Everything: White Southerners in the Age of Civil Rights, 1945-1975 (Jason Sokol). Drags in a few places, but it's a wonderful look at complexities of everything. Not a starter book, though.

- Game Change: Obama and the Clintons, McCain and Palin, and the Race of a Lifetime (John Heilemann and Mark Halperin). Strangely, Obama was the least interesting individual in the whole race. Remember when Sarah Palin was relevant? Very non-political to be a political book.

- Those Guys Have All the Fun: Inside the World of ESPN (James Andrew Miller & Tom Shales). Not as much dirt as you'd hope but still very compelling. Contains about two paragraphs on the AWA venture.

- Arctic Labyrinth (Glyn Williams). The Brits look for the Northwest Passage from the 1500s-1840s. Is a wonderful companion to...

- The Man Who Ate His Boots: The Tragic History of the Search for the Northwest Passage (Anthony Brandt). Covers a lot of the same missions but in a different style. Both have a wealth of information on the ost Franklin expedition(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franklin's_lost_expedition), which is one of those holy shit moments from history.

- King Edward VIII: A Life (Philip Ziegler). A book on royalty that isn't totally trashy, though it contains lots of fun stuff. Ziegler dipped into a wealth of resources to make this, more than most biographers do. Very balanced work.

Last edited on Fri Dec 16th, 2011 08:04 pm by Hammer to Fall

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Hammer to Fall wrote:
- Those Guys Have All the Fun: Inside the World of ESPN (James Andrew Miller & Tom Shales). Not as much dirt as you'd hope but still very compelling. Contains about two paragraphs on the AWA venture.


I've read that book. The first book on ESPN was better. This one is good but it lets some people off easy especially Chris Berman.

And Carrie Ross. Damn she led a secluded life prior to working at ESPN. Think about this. When's the first time you ever saw a marijuana bong? Carrie didn't see one until she worked at ESPN.

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The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism by Naomi Klein.  I don't read but a few minutes at night and this book has taken longer than expected because there is a lot to digest.

It's mainly about how the free market and multinational corporations are fucking everyone over.

carpetbeggar
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clawmaster wrote: Hammer to Fall wrote:
- Those Guys Have All the Fun: Inside the World of ESPN (James Andrew Miller & Tom Shales). Not as much dirt as you'd hope but still very compelling. Contains about two paragraphs on the AWA venture.


I've read that book. The first book on ESPN was better. This one is good but it lets some people off easy especially Chris Berman.

And Carrie Ross. Damn she led a secluded life prior to working at ESPN. Think about this. When's the first time you ever saw a marijuana bong? Carrie didn't see one until she worked at ESPN.

What was the name of the other ESPN book? The one that had the dirt in it? If I remember correctly it had a lot of dirt on Mike Tirico and his sexual harassment escapades. I've always been dumbfounded how he's kept his job there for so long. I read it back in the Winter of '04, but can't remember the author, or the name of it. I'd actually like to go back and read it again.

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Currently reading Ace Frehley's book. No mention of doing lines of coke with Stingmark thus far.

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This was actually pretty good.


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Re-reading "Watch You Bleed" by Stephen Davis about Guns N' Roses... didn't like it too much the first time, but willing to give it another shot. I did like his Zepplin and Aerosmith books, but I thought he editorialized too much in the GNR one.

Trying to read Shutter Island by Dennis Lehane... I have enjoyed all his other books I have read a lot, but 1/3 of the way through this one and I think it really sucks so far.

Edit... next on my list is the Duff book due to all the good reviews the posters here have given it, followed by Shaq's book with Jackie MacMullan as co-author.


Last edited on Sat Dec 17th, 2011 01:25 am by stone2k

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carpetbeggar wrote: clawmaster wrote: Hammer to Fall wrote:
- Those Guys Have All the Fun: Inside the World of ESPN (James Andrew Miller & Tom Shales). Not as much dirt as you'd hope but still very compelling. Contains about two paragraphs on the AWA venture.


I've read that book. The first book on ESPN was better. This one is good but it lets some people off easy especially Chris Berman.

And Carrie Ross. Damn she led a secluded life prior to working at ESPN. Think about this. When's the first time you ever saw a marijuana bong? Carrie didn't see one until she worked at ESPN.

What was the name of the other ESPN book? The one that had the dirt in it? If I remember correctly it had a lot of dirt on Mike Tirico and his sexual harassment escapades. I've always been dumbfounded how he's kept his job there for so long. I read it back in the Winter of '04, but can't remember the author, or the name of it. I'd actually like to go back and read it again.

ESPN The Uncensored History by Michael Freeman

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clawmaster wrote: carpetbeggar wrote: clawmaster wrote: Hammer to Fall wrote:
- Those Guys Have All the Fun: Inside the World of ESPN (James Andrew Miller & Tom Shales). Not as much dirt as you'd hope but still very compelling. Contains about two paragraphs on the AWA venture.


I've read that book. The first book on ESPN was better. This one is good but it lets some people off easy especially Chris Berman.

And Carrie Ross. Damn she led a secluded life prior to working at ESPN. Think about this. When's the first time you ever saw a marijuana bong? Carrie didn't see one until she worked at ESPN.

What was the name of the other ESPN book? The one that had the dirt in it? If I remember correctly it had a lot of dirt on Mike Tirico and his sexual harassment escapades. I've always been dumbfounded how he's kept his job there for so long. I read it back in the Winter of '04, but can't remember the author, or the name of it. I'd actually like to go back and read it again.

ESPN The Uncensored History by Michael Freeman

The first ESPN book was a good read... I will end up getting the second one eventually.

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http://www.amazon.com/Breakthrough-Boys-ebook/dp/B0064A4VPK/ref=pd_rhf_gw_p_t_1

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Mick wrote:
Currently reading Ace Frehley's book. No mention of doing lines of coke with Stingmark thus far.

I was disappointed in that book. I have a feeling he was holding back on his criticism of Gene and Paul for fear of being sued.

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BuddyPSHayes wrote: Mick wrote:
Currently reading Ace Frehley's book. No mention of doing lines of coke with Stingmark thus far.

I was disappointed in that book. I have a feeling he was holding back on his criticism of Gene and Paul for fear of being sued.

I really disliked Gene's book as well... he seemed to claim to invent everything to do with rock. It seemed very pompous to me.

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I don't really read books anymore. Mostly just rasslin message boards.

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mike3775 wrote: carpetbeggar wrote: Now I'm reading Tom Clancy's 'The Cardinal Of The Kremlin' again
Are you going to read the Clancy John Ryan books in order?

I loved that book(Cardinal), and I think that is the best John Ryan novel Clancy did, with Debt of Honor and Executive Orders close 2nd and 3rd

I am a big Tom Clancy fan and I am trying to read the books in storyline order (according to: http://www.clancyfaq.com/Hold%20Originals/Ryanvers.htm). I have read "Without Remorse" and "Patriot Games" and am currently reading "The Red Rabbit".

I enjoy Clancy's books since I live in Maryland and many of his books in the series are based in the Baltimore-Washington area so I am very familiar with the settings. Additionally, I think Clancy is a class act since he has donated millions of dollars to the Johns Hopkins Hospital and Johns Hopkins University's School of Medicine as a gift for the treatment that he received while as a patient at the Wilmer Eye Clinic (Johns Hopkins Hospital).

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mike3775 wrote: carpetbeggar wrote: Now I'm reading Tom Clancy's 'The Cardinal Of The Kremlin' again
Are you going to read the Clancy John Ryan books in order?

I loved that book(Cardinal), and I think that is the best John Ryan novel Clancy did, with Debt of Honor and Executive Orders close 2nd and 3rd

I have no plans to at the moment as I have a huge list of books I have to read first. I'm the type of person who will buy books and not read them right away. I've got quite a few that I've gotten as long as four years ago that I've haven't gotten around to reading yet. I kinda like it that way as I can go to my bookshelf and always find a good selection of titles I haven't read, but obviously want to because I wouldn't have bought them in the first place. Not all of them, but a fair chunk of them I bought while they were on sale or discount and during the couple times I had one of those 'Chapters' bookstore discount cards that are good for a year and give you a certain % off on any book you buy and they give you tons of coupons for more discounts when you purchase the card.

It's like I have my own personal library.

I also try to avoid the big/major book retailers now as much as I can and always search any used book stores I come across to see if I can find anything I may be looking for first. I read a lot of classic literature (Homer, Arrian, Ceasar, Dickens, Doyle, Robert E. Howard that type of stuff) and will always buy that used as you can find anything like that in abundance and cheap at any used bookstore.

Even with graphic novels now, I'll always see if I can search out a used copy first, before buying brand new.

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carpetbeggar wrote: ...Even with graphic novels now, I'll always see if I can search out a used copy first, before buying brand new.

Amazon.com is a great resource for used books. I have purchased many used books via Amazon for less than $5 total (which included shipping).

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carpetbeggar wrote: mike3775 wrote: carpetbeggar wrote: Now I'm reading Tom Clancy's 'The Cardinal Of The Kremlin' again
Are you going to read the Clancy John Ryan books in order?

I loved that book(Cardinal), and I think that is the best John Ryan novel Clancy did, with Debt of Honor and Executive Orders close 2nd and 3rd

I have no plans to at the moment as I have a huge list of books I have to read first. I'm the type of person who will buy books and not read them right away. I've got quite a few that I've gotten as long as four years ago that I've haven't gotten around to reading yet. I kinda like it that way as I can go to my bookshelf and always find a good selection of titles I haven't read, but obviously want to because I wouldn't have bought them in the first place. Not all of them, but a fair chunk of them I bought while they were on sale or discount and during the couple times I had one of those 'Chapters' bookstore discount cards that are good for a year and give you a certain % off on any book you buy and they give you tons of coupons for more discounts when you purchase the card.

It's like I have my own personal library.

I also try to avoid the big/major book retailers now as much as I can and always search any used book stores I come across to see if I can find anything I may be looking for first. I read a lot of classic literature (Homer, Arrian, Ceasar, Dickens, Doyle, Robert E. Howard that type of stuff) and will always buy that used as you can find anything like that in abundance and cheap at any used bookstore.

Even with graphic novels now, I'll always see if I can search out a used copy first, before buying brand new.
I used to be the same way with books, but now I have the e-reader so I have no need for books, but I still have not tossed or removed the books sitting on the shelves in my house because I like the way they look where they are at

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I ran across a run of Mad Magazine from the late 90s last night and flipped through about 5 or 6 issues.

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srossi wrote: Haven't had a good book thread in 6 months to a year.  I've been going through about a book a week. 

Just finished reading an anthology of the four main Sherlock Holmes novels that make up the primary canon: "A Study in Scarlet" (1887), "The Sign of the Four" (1890), "The Hound of the Baskervilles" (1901), and "The Valley of Fear" (1914).  Excellent reads and so different and more clever than these stupid Robert Downey, Jr. movies. 

Now I'm finally getting around to reading Steven Adler's autobiography. 

Next up will be a biography on Eisenhower.  I'm not sure where I'll go from there but looking for any good fiction or non-fiction suggestions.

Despite not having the publicity of The Hound of the Baskervilles, I enjoyed The Valley of Fear more.

Currently reading To the Lighthouse, by Virginia Woolf.

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Suicide of a Superpower- Pat Buchanan

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BlueThunder wrote: Suicide of a Superpower- Pat Buchanan
I bet that's an interesting book.  I don't care for Buchanan's views most of the time and am certainly glad his run for president failed but, I respect the passion.  He was great on the McLoughlin Group that was on PBS.

Last edited on Sun Dec 18th, 2011 01:13 pm by gwlee7

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gwlee7 wrote: BlueThunder wrote: Suicide of a Superpower- Pat Buchanan
I bet that's an interesting book.  I don't care for Buchanan's views most of the time and am certainly glad his run for president failed but, I respect the passion.  He was great on the McLoughlin Group that was on PBS.
Buchanan is a great pundit that I will admit, but as a serious Presidential candidate, no way should he ever run

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Muscle & Fitness
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mike3775 wrote: gwlee7 wrote: BlueThunder wrote: Suicide of a Superpower- Pat Buchanan
I bet that's an interesting book.  I don't care for Buchanan's views most of the time and am certainly glad his run for president failed but, I respect the passion.  He was great on the McLoughlin Group that was on PBS.
Buchanan is a great pundit that I will admit, but as a serious Presidential candidate, no way should he ever run

I'd give my right arm to have him president.

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BlueThunder wrote: mike3775 wrote: gwlee7 wrote: BlueThunder wrote: Suicide of a Superpower- Pat Buchanan
I bet that's an interesting book.  I don't care for Buchanan's views most of the time and am certainly glad his run for president failed but, I respect the passion.  He was great on the McLoughlin Group that was on PBS.
Buchanan is a great pundit that I will admit, but as a serious Presidential candidate, no way should he ever run

I'd give my right arm to have him president.

Of course you would.

srossi

 

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gwlee7 wrote: BlueThunder wrote: Suicide of a Superpower- Pat Buchanan
I bet that's an interesting book.  I don't care for Buchanan's views most of the time and am certainly glad his run for president failed but, I respect the passion.  He was great on the McLoughlin Group that was on PBS.

I completely agree, the time that he and Nader spent teaming up to give more attention and viability to third party candidates was great and inspirational.  I don't begrudge him running, just thank God no one ever votes for him.

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tofu_chipmunk wrote: srossi wrote: Haven't had a good book thread in 6 months to a year.  I've been going through about a book a week. 

Just finished reading an anthology of the four main Sherlock Holmes novels that make up the primary canon: "A Study in Scarlet" (1887), "The Sign of the Four" (1890), "The Hound of the Baskervilles" (1901), and "The Valley of Fear" (1914).  Excellent reads and so different and more clever than these stupid Robert Downey, Jr. movies. 

Now I'm finally getting around to reading Steven Adler's autobiography. 

Next up will be a biography on Eisenhower.  I'm not sure where I'll go from there but looking for any good fiction or non-fiction suggestions.

Despite not having the publicity of The Hound of the Baskervilles, I enjoyed The Valley of Fear more.

I agree, although Holmes and Watson were barely in Valley of Fear.  The second half of the book was a very lengthy flashback so it didn't feel like a Holmes story, but it was very good nonetheless.

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sek69 wrote: BlueThunder wrote: mike3775 wrote: gwlee7 wrote: BlueThunder wrote: Suicide of a Superpower- Pat Buchanan
I bet that's an interesting book.  I don't care for Buchanan's views most of the time and am certainly glad his run for president failed but, I respect the passion.  He was great on the McLoughlin Group that was on PBS.
Buchanan is a great pundit that I will admit, but as a serious Presidential candidate, no way should he ever run

I'd give my right arm to have him president.

Of course you would.

I don't think a one-armed man would fare very well in the race war.

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tofu_chipmunk wrote: sek69 wrote: BlueThunder wrote: mike3775 wrote: gwlee7 wrote: BlueThunder wrote: Suicide of a Superpower- Pat Buchanan
I bet that's an interesting book.  I don't care for Buchanan's views most of the time and am certainly glad his run for president failed but, I respect the passion.  He was great on the McLoughlin Group that was on PBS.
Buchanan is a great pundit that I will admit, but as a serious Presidential candidate, no way should he ever run

I'd give my right arm to have him president.

Of course you would.

I don't think a one-armed man would fare very well in the race war.

With Buchanan as president, there wouldn't be a need for me to partake.:D

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sek69 wrote: BlueThunder wrote: mike3775 wrote: gwlee7 wrote: BlueThunder wrote: Suicide of a Superpower- Pat Buchanan
I bet that's an interesting book.  I don't care for Buchanan's views most of the time and am certainly glad his run for president failed but, I respect the passion.  He was great on the McLoughlin Group that was on PBS.
Buchanan is a great pundit that I will admit, but as a serious Presidential candidate, no way should he ever run

I'd give my right arm to have him president.

Of course you would.

Boy, it would truly suck to see American companies returning back home, an end of the tidal wave of illegals, no more needless wars, massive deportations, and a restoration of the 2nd Amendment.

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BlueThunder wrote: sek69 wrote: BlueThunder wrote: mike3775 wrote: gwlee7 wrote: BlueThunder wrote: Suicide of a Superpower- Pat Buchanan
I bet that's an interesting book.  I don't care for Buchanan's views most of the time and am certainly glad his run for president failed but, I respect the passion.  He was great on the McLoughlin Group that was on PBS.
Buchanan is a great pundit that I will admit, but as a serious Presidential candidate, no way should he ever run

I'd give my right arm to have him president.

Of course you would.

Boy, it would truly suck to see American companies returning back home, an end of the tidal wave of illegals, no more needless wars, massive deportations, and a restoration of the 2nd Amendment.

Well at least a couple of those things would suck.

BlueThunder



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srossi wrote: BlueThunder wrote: sek69 wrote: BlueThunder wrote: mike3775 wrote: gwlee7 wrote: BlueThunder wrote: Suicide of a Superpower- Pat Buchanan
I bet that's an interesting book.  I don't care for Buchanan's views most of the time and am certainly glad his run for president failed but, I respect the passion.  He was great on the McLoughlin Group that was on PBS.
Buchanan is a great pundit that I will admit, but as a serious Presidential candidate, no way should he ever run

I'd give my right arm to have him president.

Of course you would.

Boy, it would truly suck to see American companies returning back home, an end of the tidal wave of illegals, no more needless wars, massive deportations, and a restoration of the 2nd Amendment.

Well at least a couple of those things would suck.

This should be good. Which ones.

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There's no need to "restore" the second amendment, it hasn't gone anywhere.

srossi

 

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BlueThunder wrote: srossi wrote: BlueThunder wrote: sek69 wrote: BlueThunder wrote: mike3775 wrote: gwlee7 wrote: BlueThunder wrote: Suicide of a Superpower- Pat Buchanan
I bet that's an interesting book.  I don't care for Buchanan's views most of the time and am certainly glad his run for president failed but, I respect the passion.  He was great on the McLoughlin Group that was on PBS.
Buchanan is a great pundit that I will admit, but as a serious Presidential candidate, no way should he ever run

I'd give my right arm to have him president.

Of course you would.

Boy, it would truly suck to see American companies returning back home, an end of the tidal wave of illegals, no more needless wars, massive deportations, and a restoration of the 2nd Amendment.

Well at least a couple of those things would suck.

This should be good. Which ones.

Not everyone is as xenophobic as you and Pat.  Not to mention inaccurate, as there is hardly a "tidal wave" of illegals, especially since the economic crash.  Funny thing is, before the border war was intensified by yahoos, illegals used to come here for seasonal work that Americans didn't want to do, make some money, then go home until the next year.  The more we enforce the borders, the more we make them stay here.  One of the unintended consequences that happens whenever we try to enforce unjust laws.  That's just fact, check out illegal immigration demos from the past 75 years.  We went from moderate two-way flow to massive one-way flow, although lately no one really wants to come here anymore comparatively speaking.

Last edited on Tue Dec 20th, 2011 04:01 am by srossi

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sek69 wrote: There's no need to "restore" the second amendment, it hasn't gone anywhere.

Funny thing about 2nd amendment zealots is that they never seem to care all that much about the other 9 in the Bill of Rights.  Not that it's not important, but I'd say the 2nd is by far the least trampled of the bunch in the past decade.  And yet that was the only one Thunder mentioned, predictably enough.

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srossi wrote: BlueThunder wrote: srossi wrote: BlueThunder wrote: sek69 wrote: BlueThunder wrote: mike3775 wrote: gwlee7 wrote: BlueThunder wrote: Suicide of a Superpower- Pat Buchanan
I bet that's an interesting book.  I don't care for Buchanan's views most of the time and am certainly glad his run for president failed but, I respect the passion.  He was great on the McLoughlin Group that was on PBS.
Buchanan is a great pundit that I will admit, but as a serious Presidential candidate, no way should he ever run

I'd give my right arm to have him president.

Of course you would.

Boy, it would truly suck to see American companies returning back home, an end of the tidal wave of illegals, no more needless wars, massive deportations, and a restoration of the 2nd Amendment.

Well at least a couple of those things would suck.

This should be good. Which ones.

Not everyone is as xenophobic as you and Pat.  Not to mention inaccurate, as there is hardly a "tidal wave" of illegals, especially since the economic crash.  Funny thing is, before the border war was intensified by yahoos, illegals used to come here for seasonal work that Americans didn't want to do, make some money, then go home until the next year.  The more we enforce the borders, the more we make them stay here.  One of the unintended consequences that happens whenever we try to enforce unjust laws.  That's just fact, check out illegal immigration demos from the past 75 years.  We went from moderate two-way flow to massive one-way flow, although lately no one really wants to come here anymore comparatively speaking.


Your argument has more holes than swiss cheese. I'll grant you that illegal crossing has dipped because of the recession. Gee, what's going to happen once we get back on track? Please explained to me how we have an estimated 20 million illegals since the 1986 Reagan amnesty? If your theory was correct, we would have a fraction of that if the worked and went home.

 

I see you buy into the "doing jobs Americans won't do" malarky. Just curious, who did these jobs before we had this epidemic of illegals? I'll save you the time. Legal immigrants, teenagers, and low IQ Americans typiclly did these menial jobs.

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sek69 wrote: There's no need to "restore" the second amendment, it hasn't gone anywhere.

It was only a year ago that Chicagoans finally got the right to own a gun in the privacy of their own home. Even with that, there are too many senseless restrictions. The fact that we can't carry, is a violation of our rights.

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BlueThunder wrote: I see you buy into the "doing jobs Americans won't do" malarky. Just curious, who did these jobs before we had this epidemic of illegals? I'll save you the time. Legal immigrants, teenagers, and low IQ Americans typiclly did these menial jobs.

Blacks and Irish mostly, and they were legal immigrants by choice or force and there were a shitload of them.  Other legal immigrants had already moved up.  Obviously now we don't have that large influx of legal immigrants willing to do anything and we never will again.  And children of course.  Not teenagers, more like 10-year olds.  You're not going back far enough when it comes to child labor because it kinda makes Americans look bad, but a lack of child labor laws certainly helped a lot.  The lowest classes with the least rights will always do those jobs in any era.  Today those are illegal immigrants.  Between the social safety nets and a sense of entitlement, you're not turning back the clock and making anyone else do a lot of those jobs again, not even teens and sure as hell not most legals, many of whom are better educated than most on this board.  And that is hardly one of the top 100 problems we face today.

Last edited on Tue Dec 20th, 2011 04:30 am by srossi

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srossi wrote: BlueThunder wrote: I see you buy into the "doing jobs Americans won't do" malarky. Just curious, who did these jobs before we had this epidemic of illegals? I'll save you the time. Legal immigrants, teenagers, and low IQ Americans typiclly did these menial jobs.

Blacks and Irish mostly, and they were legal immigrants by choice or force and there were a shitload of them.  Other legal immigrants had already moved up.  Obviously now we don't have that large influx of legal immigrants willing to do anything and we never will again.  And children of course.  Not teenagers, more like 10-year olds.  You're not going back far enough when it comes to child labor because it kinda makes Americans look bad, but a lack of child labor laws certainly helped a lot.  The lowest classes with the least rights will always do those jobs in any era.  Today those are illegal immigrants.  And it's hardly one of the top 100 problems we face. 


Dude, you're way off. In my old neighborhood, it wasn't unusual to see white teenagers mow lawns, rake leafs, shovel snow, and wash dishes. Of course, there was always the low IQ adults with no worthy skills that worked with them. I'm not ashamed to say that I washed dishes at my cousins restaurant, pumped gas, and bagged groceries.

 

How's this for killing two birds with one stone. We should seriously slash welfare benefits. These freeloaders will now have to actually work in order to survive. They will finally do what they should have been doing for the last forty years by cleaning toilets, washing dishes, and menial farm work.  In doing this, the former welfare recipients will finally gain some sort of dignity. Who knows, they may become decent parents.

Last edited on Tue Dec 20th, 2011 04:37 am by BlueThunder

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BlueThunder wrote: Your argument has more holes than swiss cheese. I'll grant you that illegal crossing has dipped because of the recession. Gee, what's going to happen once we get back on track? Please explained to me how we have an estimated 20 million illegals since the 1986 Reagan amnesty? If your theory was correct, we would have a fraction of that if the worked and went home.

Because my world begins before Reagan was president.  I'm going back further than that.  In the '50s and '60s in particular, they came and went every year. 

BlueThunder



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srossi wrote: BlueThunder wrote: Your argument has more holes than swiss cheese. I'll grant you that illegal crossing has dipped because of the recession. Gee, what's going to happen once we get back on track? Please explained to me how we have an estimated 20 million illegals since the 1986 Reagan amnesty? If your theory was correct, we would have a fraction of that if the worked and went home.

Because my world begins before Reagan was president.  I'm going back further than that.  In the '50s and '60s in particular, they came and went every year. 


Then you would know that 1.3 million illegalls received a one way ticket back home courtesy of Eisenhower under Operation Wetback.

 

Believe it or not, I'd be in favor ofa  true guest worker program. This would have to be monitored very closely.

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BlueThunder wrote: srossi wrote: BlueThunder wrote: I see you buy into the "doing jobs Americans won't do" malarky. Just curious, who did these jobs before we had this epidemic of illegals? I'll save you the time. Legal immigrants, teenagers, and low IQ Americans typiclly did these menial jobs.

Blacks and Irish mostly, and they were legal immigrants by choice or force and there were a shitload of them.  Other legal immigrants had already moved up.  Obviously now we don't have that large influx of legal immigrants willing to do anything and we never will again.  And children of course.  Not teenagers, more like 10-year olds.  You're not going back far enough when it comes to child labor because it kinda makes Americans look bad, but a lack of child labor laws certainly helped a lot.  The lowest classes with the least rights will always do those jobs in any era.  Today those are illegal immigrants.  And it's hardly one of the top 100 problems we face. 


Dude, you're way off. In my old neighborhood, it wasn't unusual to see white teenagers mow lawns, rake leafs, shovel snow, and wash dishes. Of course, there was always the low IQ adults with no worthy skills that worked with them. I'm not ashamed to say that I washed dishes at my cousins restaurant, pumped gas, and bagged groceries.

Wow, you're older than I figured.  Your old neighborhood is from the late 1800s - early 1900's?  I'm not sure why you're talking about 1970s or '80 suburban middle-class America when I'm telling you about the history of the immigration issue in this country.  You're making huge broad generalizations and then when I dispute them you suddenly focus on a very specific time or neighborhood.  You can't have it both ways. 

Anyway, back to books...

Last edited on Tue Dec 20th, 2011 04:41 am by srossi

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BlueThunder wrote:
sek69 wrote: There's no need to "restore" the second amendment, it hasn't gone anywhere.

It was only a year ago that Chicagoans finally got the right to own a gun in the privacy of their own home.


Explain to me how Chicago has been immune to the Constitution for the last 200+ years.

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Anyway...

 

I just finished reading the first 2 1/3 books of the "Girl With The Dragon Tattoo" trilogy - got bored of the discussions of the Swedish secret service in the third book. Now, I've got some other Scandinavian crime fiction I might have a go at, or I might try and get on with the rest of the JFK book (300 pages down, 1200+ to go).

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The Ultimate Sin wrote: BlueThunder wrote:
sek69 wrote: There's no need to "restore" the second amendment, it hasn't gone anywhere.

It was only a year ago that Chicagoans finally got the right to own a gun in the privacy of their own home.


Explain to me how Chicago has been immune to the Constitution for the last 200+ years.

Yeah, this one had me stumped as well.

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dogfacedgremlin34 wrote: The Ultimate Sin wrote: BlueThunder wrote:
sek69 wrote: There's no need to "restore" the second amendment, it hasn't gone anywhere.

It was only a year ago that Chicagoans finally got the right to own a gun in the privacy of their own home.


Explain to me how Chicago has been immune to the Constitution for the last 200+ years.

Yeah, this one had me stumped as well.
Chicago used to have a law making it illegal to own a gun within city limits.  Washington DC also had the same ban.  The USSC ruled that Chicago's ban was illegal, so by default DC's was as well, and they had to change the law to allow it, but they put such restrictive measures in place to still make it hard to have a gun.

EDIT:  http://articles.cnn.com/2010-06-28/justice/us.scotus.handgun.ban_1_justices-two-years-gun-control-justices-john-paul-stevens?_s=PM:CRIME

Last edited on Tue Dec 20th, 2011 02:57 pm by mike3775

BlueThunder



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mike3775 wrote:
dogfacedgremlin34 wrote: The Ultimate Sin wrote: BlueThunder wrote:
sek69 wrote: There's no need to "restore" the second amendment, it hasn't gone anywhere.

It was only a year ago that Chicagoans finally got the right to own a gun in the privacy of their own home.


Explain to me how Chicago has been immune to the Constitution for the last 200+ years.

Yeah, this one had me stumped as well.
Chicago used to have a law making it illegal to own a gun within city limits.  Washington DC also had the same ban.  The USSC ruled that Chicago's ban was illegal, so by default DC's was as well, and they had to change the law to allow it, but they put such restrictive measures in place to still make it hard to have a gun.

EDIT:  http://articles.cnn.com/2010-06-28/justice/us.scotus.handgun.ban_1_justices-two-years-gun-control-justices-john-paul-stevens?_s=PM:CRIME


Thanks Mike. I thought I already expolained it. I really didn't want to further jack this thread. I'm confident that the U.S Supreme Court will rule that our rights don't go far enough.

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user=16]srossi[/user] wrote:
But I did have the first edition hardcovers of most of those books and sold them on eBay a number of years ago for quite a lot of money.




Blah blah blah......more Rossi bullshit bullshit bullshit. Sure you did Napoleon(oops, I mean Rossi) were these all signed books too? I bet you sold them to either the parking meter lady, or to the imaginary Greek guy who keyed your car? Either way, you're completely full of shit. You're the WC version of Dr Jeff, you've been everywhere, done everything too, just like that other useless asshole. The reason why people dont call you out on so much of your bullshit shorty, is because it's funny to hear you slobber all over yourself, trying to impress us all, & show just how cool you are. Plus, you do this from the comfort of your rent
controlled apartment. Jesus christ, I bet your beastly girlfriend drinks severely whenever she's around you, or wishes she could kill herself nightly, having to listen to your bullshit, on a daily basis? She's got to
be heavily medicated for sure, to listen to you. Rossi: Crimson Mask called, he wants his gimmick back.

Last edited on Fri Dec 30th, 2011 05:55 pm by stingmark

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stingmark wrote:
 bullshit bullshit bullshit.  Napoleon parking meter lady shit asshole bullshit shorty slobber  rent controlled apartment bullshit? heavily medicated

 

I edited it down to the good parts for everyone.

You're welcome. :)

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I've been reading 11/22/63 by Stephen King...got it for Christmas. I don't read much anymore, but I always liked King and when something new comes out I usually find a way to check it out.

I'm about halfway through...good so far, IMO.

I also picked up "Don Camillo Meets hells Angels" on ebay, so that's next. It's the last Camillo book Guareschi wrote. The books are simple to read and funny in an old-world way. I've been reading them since I found a copy at my grandmothers back when I was a teenager. Good stuff, and I imagine I'll be sorry when I finish this one because there won't be anymore to read from that collection.

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khawk wrote: stingmark wrote:
 bullshit bullshit bullshit.  Napoleon parking meter lady shit asshole bullshit shorty slobber  rent controlled apartment bullshit? heavily medicated

 

I edited it down to the good parts for everyone.

You're welcome. :)



lol  You forgot the blargle fargle.

Anyway, glad this was bumped because one of my Christmas presents was "Splading's World Tour" by Mark Lamster and I just started reading it yesterday.  If anyone has any interest at all in 1800s baseball, even if you think you know a lot about it already, this is a must read.  It's all about Albert Spalding setting up a world tour in 1888-1889 to introduce the game to places as far-flung as Cairo and Sydney.  It also doubles as a pretty good biography on Spalding himself, who was kinda the P.T. Barnum of baseball both in terms of success and bluster.  There are some amazing pictures too of the ballplayers at the pyramids of Egypt and other places along the tour.  I'm really enjoying this book so far. 

(Patiently waiting for the accusations that I am bragging about my ability to read and that a parking meter lady must've taught me how in my rent-controlled apartment.)

Last edited on Fri Dec 30th, 2011 06:16 pm by srossi

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In the past week, I've read Erik Larson's Isaac's Storm and in my occasional quest to make up for the poor literary education I received in school, F. Scott Fitzgerald's Tender Is the Night.

Isaac's Storm putters around for 100 pages with below-average writing that's trying to be funny (it's not) and trying to shoehorn a feud as the main point of the book (no one really knows even why the feud started as there's scant evidence). But Larson finally gets himself in gear and the descriptions leading up to, during and after the Galveston hurricane of 1900 are quite good. If you can deal with the Isaac Cline background stuff in the early pages, it's worth it.

Tender Is the Night was pretty darn good, better than what I was expecting, especially for something with as few a-ha moments as it had.

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I am currently reading Republic Lost: How Money Corrupts Congress--and a Plan to Stop It  by Lawrence Lessig

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Just finished Steven King's 11/23/63. Outstanding! I recommend it to anyone.

I am currently struggling through Thunderstruck by Eric Larson. It is about Marconi and the invention of Radio and a murder that was apparently famous in the early part of the 20th century. The events appear to be unrelated. Not an easy read.

Ultimark



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Hammer to Fall wrote:
In the past week, I've read Erik Larson's Isaac's Storm and in my occasional quest to make up for the poor literary education I received in school, F. Scott Fitzgerald's Tender Is the Night.

Isaac's Storm putters around for 100 pages with below-average writing that's trying to be funny (it's not) and trying to shoehorn a feud as the main point of the book (no one really knows even why the feud started as there's scant evidence). But Larson finally gets himself in gear and the descriptions leading up to, during and after the Galveston hurricane of 1900 are quite good. If you can deal with the Isaac Cline background stuff in the early pages, it's worth it.

Tender Is the Night was pretty darn good, better than what I was expecting, especially for something with as few a-ha moments as it had.


Hammer - I hope you Larson book is better than mine.

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stingmark wrote:
user=16]srossi[/user] wrote:
But I did have the first edition hardcovers of most of those books and sold them on eBay a number of years ago for quite a lot of money.




Blah blah blah......more Rossi bullshit bullshit bullshit. Sure you did Napoleon(oops, I mean Rossi) were these all signed books too? I bet you sold them to either the parking meter lady, or to the imaginary Greek guy who keyed your car? Either way, you're completely full of shit. You're the WC version of Dr Jeff, you've been everywhere, done everything too, just like that other useless asshole. The reason why people dont call you out on so much of your bullshit shorty, is because it's funny to hear you slobber all over yourself, trying to impress us all, & show just how cool you are. Plus, you do this from the comfort of your rent
controlled apartment. Jesus christ, I bet your beastly girlfriend drinks severely whenever she's around you, or wishes she could kill herself nightly, having to listen to your bullshit, on a daily basis? She's got to
be heavily medicated for sure, to listen to you. Rossi: Crimson Mask called, he wants his gimmick back.


Some real acrimony here. I sense this is a shoot. Can't we all just get along?

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Finished...

Shaq Uncut with Jackie MacMullan - just kinda eh.... get it at the library, don't spend $ on it.

God No by Penn Jillette- Penn tries to spread the gospel of being an atheist... don't agree with many of his views, but still a decent read IMO.

The Best American Sports Writing 2011
- I try to get this collection every year... not bad this year, not as good as other years. If you haven't yet, get the one that was for the Century, it has almost every single important and famous article written in the 20th century... I HIGHLY recommended it.

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srossi wrote: khawk wrote: stingmark wrote:
 bullshit bullshit bullshit.  Napoleon parking meter lady shit asshole bullshit shorty slobber  rent controlled apartment bullshit? heavily medicated

 

I edited it down to the good parts for everyone.

You're welcome. :)



lol  You forgot the blargle fargle.

Anyway, glad this was bumped because one of my Christmas presents was "Splading's World Tour" by Mark Lamster and I just started reading it yesterday.  If anyone has any interest at all in 1800s baseball, even if you think you know a lot about it already, this is a must read.  It's all about Albert Spalding setting up a world tour in 1888-1889 to introduce the game to places as far-flung as Cairo and Sydney.  It also doubles as a pretty good biography on Spalding himself, who was kinda the P.T. Barnum of baseball both in terms of success and bluster.  There are some amazing pictures too of the ballplayers at the pyramids of Egypt and other places along the tour.  I'm really enjoying this book so far. 

(Patiently waiting for the accusations that I am bragging about my ability to read and that a parking meter lady must've taught me how in my rent-controlled apartment.)

I'm reading this now too based on your recommendation.  I'm about halfway through so far.  It's pretty good, although I was hoping for more Cap Anson "penis helicopter" stories on the slow boat to Australia.

srossi

 

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dogfacedgremlin34 wrote: srossi wrote: khawk wrote: stingmark wrote:
 bullshit bullshit bullshit.  Napoleon parking meter lady shit asshole bullshit shorty slobber  rent controlled apartment bullshit? heavily medicated

 

I edited it down to the good parts for everyone.

You're welcome. :)



lol  You forgot the blargle fargle.

Anyway, glad this was bumped because one of my Christmas presents was "Splading's World Tour" by Mark Lamster and I just started reading it yesterday.  If anyone has any interest at all in 1800s baseball, even if you think you know a lot about it already, this is a must read.  It's all about Albert Spalding setting up a world tour in 1888-1889 to introduce the game to places as far-flung as Cairo and Sydney.  It also doubles as a pretty good biography on Spalding himself, who was kinda the P.T. Barnum of baseball both in terms of success and bluster.  There are some amazing pictures too of the ballplayers at the pyramids of Egypt and other places along the tour.  I'm really enjoying this book so far. 

(Patiently waiting for the accusations that I am bragging about my ability to read and that a parking meter lady must've taught me how in my rent-controlled apartment.)

I'm reading this now too based on your recommendation.  I'm about halfway through so far.  It's pretty good, although I was hoping for more Cap Anson "penis helicopter" stories on the slow boat to Australia.

I should get a kick-back from these publishing companies.  I'm between books right now but I have a few I can start this week.  Hopefully I can recommend another one soon.

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My wife bought a few E-Books recently and I decided to swipe a few of them.

Reading now is To Kill a Mockingbird.  I always liked reading that book as a kid and I still love the movie as well


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Recently read the following:
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Read Lesnar's book (mediocre)...Catching up on RnR autobiographies - read Ace Frehley's, Duff McKagan's, Sammy Hagar's (excellent), and currently reading Belinda Carlisle's.

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reading Stan Hansen's Book

before that Read Angelo Mosca's book

before that it was Thom Hartman's Rebooting the American Dream

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srossi wrote: dogfacedgremlin34 wrote: srossi wrote: khawk wrote: stingmark wrote:
 bullshit bullshit bullshit.  Napoleon parking meter lady shit asshole bullshit shorty slobber  rent controlled apartment bullshit? heavily medicated

 

I edited it down to the good parts for everyone.

You're welcome. :)



lol  You forgot the blargle fargle.

Anyway, glad this was bumped because one of my Christmas presents was "Splading's World Tour" by Mark Lamster and I just started reading it yesterday.  If anyone has any interest at all in 1800s baseball, even if you think you know a lot about it already, this is a must read.  It's all about Albert Spalding setting up a world tour in 1888-1889 to introduce the game to places as far-flung as Cairo and Sydney.  It also doubles as a pretty good biography on Spalding himself, who was kinda the P.T. Barnum of baseball both in terms of success and bluster.  There are some amazing pictures too of the ballplayers at the pyramids of Egypt and other places along the tour.  I'm really enjoying this book so far. 

(Patiently waiting for the accusations that I am bragging about my ability to read and that a parking meter lady must've taught me how in my rent-controlled apartment.)

I'm reading this now too based on your recommendation.  I'm about halfway through so far.  It's pretty good, although I was hoping for more Cap Anson "penis helicopter" stories on the slow boat to Australia.

I should get a kick-back from these publishing companies.  I'm between books right now but I have a few I can start this week.  Hopefully I can recommend another one soon.


I get all mine from the library/public domain, so there's nary a royalty to be found from me.

Still good recommendations tho...keep 'em coming.

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Just finished The Great Mortality (John Kelly) about the Black Death. Fifty percent of Europe dead in two years. About the only folks who didn't suffer quite as badly - all three forms of it - were some native Irish and northern Scandinavians. Everybody else? Bam. And like a good bit of history, it turns into Jewish persecution because they have to pin blame on somebody, even if the Jews are dying just as much as everyone else.

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Started reading last night a really good book by Bernard Bornwell titled 'The Fort.'
It is a historical fiction book concerning the Revolutionary War." in 1779'. It takes place in Maine when all the major fighting in the war is concerted in the South at this time.
Good read.

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Been stuck at home lately with no internet or TV (it gets installed Friday) so i have had plenty of reading time.

I have read all 4 Odd Thomas books this last 2 weeks,and am now having a go of Joseph Wambaughs "Hollywood Crows" series. Wambaugh is the best cop autohor out there,bar none.

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carpetbeggar wrote: Started reading last night a really good book by Bernard Bornwell titled 'The Fort.'
It is a historical fiction book concerning the Revolutionary War." in 1779'. It takes place in Maine when all the major fighting in the war is concerted in the South at this time.
Good read.


Sounds like exactly the type of book I like to read.  I'll check it.

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katook wrote: Been stuck at home lately with no internet or TV (it gets installed Friday) so i have had plenty of reading time.

I have read all 4 Odd Thomas books this last 2 weeks,and am now having a go of Joseph Wambaughs "Hollywood Crows" series. Wambaugh is the best cop autohor out there,bar none.

Never been much of a Dean Koontz fan, but I have had a few people say they like the Odd Thomas books, so I may have to check them out, but usually I am not a fan of supernatural novels.

I read the Choirboys by Wambaugh a long time ago... liked it ok, but only read one more of his books... may need to check some others out.

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Just finished Masked Decisions by Dick "Destoyer" Beyer. Not sure what is next on the list...

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I'm reading "Sleepwalk With Me" by comedian Mike Birbiglia.

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The Ultimate Sin wrote: I'm reading "Sleepwalk With Me" by comedian Mike Birbiglia.

I like his standup, so I might check that out.

 

I've just finished vol. 1 of the "Martin Beck" series, a 1960s 10-niovel Swedish detective series. Every grumpy detective owes him a debt, and they're brilliantly written books (by a husband-and-wife team, apparently).

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I hear Newt Gingrich is reading the writing on the wall

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Just finished The Destroyer's book. I have to admit I was a little disappointed. Too much of life outside of the ring and not enough about his wrestling career and inside the ring for me. I think the author having little knowledge of pro wrestling didn't help.

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Famous Mortimer wrote: The Ultimate Sin wrote: I'm reading "Sleepwalk With Me" by comedian Mike Birbiglia.

I like his standup, so I might check that out.


Saw him open twice, the first time for Stephen Lynch in Central Park in a really cool show.  Very underrated comic.  I didn't know he had a book out, maybe I'll check it out.

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srossi wrote:
Famous Mortimer wrote: The Ultimate Sin wrote: I'm reading "Sleepwalk With Me" by comedian Mike Birbiglia.

I like his standup, so I might check that out.


Saw him open twice, the first time for Stephen Lynch in Central Park in a really cool show.  Very underrated comic.  I didn't know he had a book out, maybe I'll check it out.


I got it for Christmas last year, but just got around to reading it. It's just a bunch of anecdotes, and is a very light read. I've enjoyed it so far.

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srossi wrote: carpetbeggar wrote: Started reading last night a really good book by Bernard Cornwell titled 'The Fort.'
It is a historical fiction book concerning the Revolutionary War." in 1779'. It takes place in Maine when all the major fighting in the war is concentrated in the South at this time.
Good read.


Sounds like exactly the type of book I like to read.  I'll check it.

I didn't do a thorough spell check there srossi. It should read 'The Fort' by Bernard Cornwell. It's published by Harper Collins.

Here's his website:
http://www.bernardcornwell.net/

He has written a ton of historical fiction. He's most remembered for the "Richard Sharpe" series of books he's written which were made into a series of TV Movies for The BBC.

Really enjoying 'The Fort' so far as the majority of characters are based on real people of the time period and has a bit of a Halifax, Nova Scotia connection too, with the story taking place in the modern day State Of Maine. Plus Halifax played a large roll as a British command center throughout the U.S. War Of Independence anyway. The author even has a sort of "code" to tell the reader which of the characters are fictitious (basically what letter their last name begins with). He explains this in the notes in the beginning of the book. It's a fairly lengthy read too, at 682 pages, but that is in large print format.

I highly recommend the book srossi if this part of history interests you.

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yellowdog wrote:
Just finished The Destroyer's book. I have to admit I was a little disappointed. Too much of life outside of the ring and not enough about his wrestling career and inside the ring for me. I think the author having little knowledge of pro wrestling didn't help.
I was planning to get it but not worth it? Thats what I thought of Angelo Moscas book, too much Canadian Football too little wrestling

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I keep meaning to buy Gary Hart's book. Recommendations?

 

After racing through that crime book last night, I'm thinking of cracking on with page 300+ of the 1500 page JFK book I have, or the one which just arrived from Amazon, on the late night TV wars, Conan and Jay Leno and suchlike. The moment's passed now, and Conan has shown himself to be every bit as lazy as Dave and Jay (although still funnier than either), but it still might be worth a read.

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Marijuana horticulture by Cervantes

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Portalesman wrote: Marijuana horticulture by Cervantes
Sancho Panza could definitely roll the fatties.

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Like a few others, I read "Those Guys Have All The Fun: Inside The World Of ESPN" and enjoyed it tremendously, especially the station's origins and the rise and fall of Mark Shapiro.

Lately I've also read "I Want My MTV" which is an oral history similar to the ESPN book, charting the creation and rise of MTV. The book only covers the period through 1992 on the basis that the debut and success of "The Real World" changed the station forever.

I also fell into reading "World War Z". The story is set a decade or so after the end of a global war against zombies and written in an interview style with various people who lived through it. It probably sounds ridiculous reading that synopsis, but within the context of the book it works. There's a lot of social and political commentary mixed in, some obvious, some less so. It's being made into a movie starring Brad Pitt. Some fans of the book are outraged that the storytelling vehicle is being dramatically changed for the film, but unless someone shot the book as a documentary, I don't know what else a studio could do.

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tamalie wrote: I also fell into reading "World War Z". The story is set a decade or so after the end of a global war against zombies and written in an interview style with various people who lived through it. It probably sounds ridiculous reading that synopsis, but within the context of the book it works. There's a lot of social and political commentary mixed in, some obvious, some less so. It's being made into a movie starring Brad Pitt. Some fans of the book are outraged that the storytelling vehicle is being dramatically changed for the film, but unless someone shot the book as a documentary, I don't know what else a studio could do.

Excellent choice Tamalie. One of the main outrages coming out of the movie is the fact that in some teasers that people have seen of the movie and of discussions by people who played minor parts in the movie is that these aren't your typical zombies. They are more in the vein of the '28 Days Later' and 'Dawn Of The Dead '04' creatures where they "turn" almost instantly after being infected and are like "track star" zombies in that they are of the "running" variety as opposed to the traditional George Romeroesque type zombies which are "shamblers."
In the book, the author Max Brooks had the Romero style zombies, that lurched rather than ran and they didn't turn into zombies seconds after being infected by another zombie.
People who are fans of zombie fiction (myself included) are sticklers for detail and the majority of us hated the introduction of the running zombies in the Dawn '04 remake. They were alright in the dark comedy style setting that was "Return Of The Living Dead" from 1985, but not in a movie which takes zombies seriously (as funny as that sounds).

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carpetbeggar wrote: tamalie wrote: I also fell into reading "World War Z". The story is set a decade or so after the end of a global war against zombies and written in an interview style with various people who lived through it. It probably sounds ridiculous reading that synopsis, but within the context of the book it works. There's a lot of social and political commentary mixed in, some obvious, some less so. It's being made into a movie starring Brad Pitt. Some fans of the book are outraged that the storytelling vehicle is being dramatically changed for the film, but unless someone shot the book as a documentary, I don't know what else a studio could do.

Excellent choice Tamalie. One of the main outrages coming out of the movie is the fact that in some teasers that people have seen of the movie and of discussions by people who played minor parts in the movie is that these aren't your typical zombies. They are more in the vein of the '28 Days Later' and 'Dawn Of The Dead '04' creatures where they "turn" almost instantly after being infected and are like "track star" zombies in that they are of the "running" variety as opposed to the traditional George Romeroesque type zombies which are "shamblers."
In the book, the author Max Brooks had the Romero style zombies, that lurched rather than ran and they didn't turn into zombies seconds after being infected by another zombie.
People who are fans of zombie fiction (myself included) are sticklers for detail and the majority of us hated the introduction of the running zombies in the Dawn '04 remake. They were alright in the dark comedy style setting that was "Return Of The Living Dead" from 1985, but not in a movie which takes zombies seriously (as funny as that sounds).

"The ambling zombies are still real to me, dammit!"

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tofu_chipmunk wrote: carpetbeggar wrote: tamalie wrote: I also fell into reading "World War Z". The story is set a decade or so after the end of a global war against zombies and written in an interview style with various people who lived through it. It probably sounds ridiculous reading that synopsis, but within the context of the book it works. There's a lot of social and political commentary mixed in, some obvious, some less so. It's being made into a movie starring Brad Pitt. Some fans of the book are outraged that the storytelling vehicle is being dramatically changed for the film, but unless someone shot the book as a documentary, I don't know what else a studio could do.

Excellent choice Tamalie. One of the main outrages coming out of the movie is the fact that in some teasers that people have seen of the movie and of discussions by people who played minor parts in the movie is that these aren't your typical zombies. They are more in the vein of the '28 Days Later' and 'Dawn Of The Dead '04' creatures where they "turn" almost instantly after being infected and are like "track star" zombies in that they are of the "running" variety as opposed to the traditional George Romeroesque type zombies which are "shamblers."
In the book, the author Max Brooks had the Romero style zombies, that lurched rather than ran and they didn't turn into zombies seconds after being infected by another zombie.
People who are fans of zombie fiction (myself included) are sticklers for detail and the majority of us hated the introduction of the running zombies in the Dawn '04 remake. They were alright in the dark comedy style setting that was "Return Of The Living Dead" from 1985, but not in a movie which takes zombies seriously (as funny as that sounds).

"The ambling zombies are still real to me, dammit!"
  World War Z was a great read.  As George Romero said in a recent interview "fast zombies suck".

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thunderbolt wrote: tofu_chipmunk wrote: carpetbeggar wrote: tamalie wrote: I also fell into reading "World War Z". The story is set a decade or so after the end of a global war against zombies and written in an interview style with various people who lived through it. It probably sounds ridiculous reading that synopsis, but within the context of the book it works. There's a lot of social and political commentary mixed in, some obvious, some less so. It's being made into a movie starring Brad Pitt. Some fans of the book are outraged that the storytelling vehicle is being dramatically changed for the film, but unless someone shot the book as a documentary, I don't know what else a studio could do.

Excellent choice Tamalie. One of the main outrages coming out of the movie is the fact that in some teasers that people have seen of the movie and of discussions by people who played minor parts in the movie is that these aren't your typical zombies. They are more in the vein of the '28 Days Later' and 'Dawn Of The Dead '04' creatures where they "turn" almost instantly after being infected and are like "track star" zombies in that they are of the "running" variety as opposed to the traditional George Romeroesque type zombies which are "shamblers."
In the book, the author Max Brooks had the Romero style zombies, that lurched rather than ran and they didn't turn into zombies seconds after being infected by another zombie.
People who are fans of zombie fiction (myself included) are sticklers for detail and the majority of us hated the introduction of the running zombies in the Dawn '04 remake. They were alright in the dark comedy style setting that was "Return Of The Living Dead" from 1985, but not in a movie which takes zombies seriously (as funny as that sounds).

"The ambling zombies are still real to me, dammit!"
  World War Z was a great read.  As George Romero said in a recent interview "fast zombies suck".
I just grabbed World War Z, based on these posts.  I also agree with Romero

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mike3775 wrote: thunderbolt wrote: tofu_chipmunk wrote: carpetbeggar wrote: tamalie wrote: I also fell into reading "World War Z". The story is set a decade or so after the end of a global war against zombies and written in an interview style with various people who lived through it. It probably sounds ridiculous reading that synopsis, but within the context of the book it works. There's a lot of social and political commentary mixed in, some obvious, some less so. It's being made into a movie starring Brad Pitt. Some fans of the book are outraged that the storytelling vehicle is being dramatically changed for the film, but unless someone shot the book as a documentary, I don't know what else a studio could do.

Excellent choice Tamalie. One of the main outrages coming out of the movie is the fact that in some teasers that people have seen of the movie and of discussions by people who played minor parts in the movie is that these aren't your typical zombies. They are more in the vein of the '28 Days Later' and 'Dawn Of The Dead '04' creatures where they "turn" almost instantly after being infected and are like "track star" zombies in that they are of the "running" variety as opposed to the traditional George Romeroesque type zombies which are "shamblers."
In the book, the author Max Brooks had the Romero style zombies, that lurched rather than ran and they didn't turn into zombies seconds after being infected by another zombie.
People who are fans of zombie fiction (myself included) are sticklers for detail and the majority of us hated the introduction of the running zombies in the Dawn '04 remake. They were alright in the dark comedy style setting that was "Return Of The Living Dead" from 1985, but not in a movie which takes zombies seriously (as funny as that sounds).

"The ambling zombies are still real to me, dammit!"
  World War Z was a great read.  As George Romero said in a recent interview "fast zombies suck".
I just grabbed World War Z, based on these posts.  I also agree with Romero

I thought the fast zombies were good in "Zombieland", which I enjoyed a lot.

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I didn't.  I like slow zombies, but thats probably because I grew up with slow moving zombies.  My kids, have only seen fast movie zombies for the most part, so they prefer faster zombies

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stone2k wrote: mike3775 wrote: thunderbolt wrote: tofu_chipmunk wrote: carpetbeggar wrote: tamalie wrote: I also fell into reading "World War Z". The story is set a decade or so after the end of a global war against zombies and written in an interview style with various people who lived through it. It probably sounds ridiculous reading that synopsis, but within the context of the book it works. There's a lot of social and political commentary mixed in, some obvious, some less so. It's being made into a movie starring Brad Pitt. Some fans of the book are outraged that the storytelling vehicle is being dramatically changed for the film, but unless someone shot the book as a documentary, I don't know what else a studio could do.

Excellent choice Tamalie. One of the main outrages coming out of the movie is the fact that in some teasers that people have seen of the movie and of discussions by people who played minor parts in the movie is that these aren't your typical zombies. They are more in the vein of the '28 Days Later' and 'Dawn Of The Dead '04' creatures where they "turn" almost instantly after being infected and are like "track star" zombies in that they are of the "running" variety as opposed to the traditional George Romeroesque type zombies which are "shamblers."
In the book, the author Max Brooks had the Romero style zombies, that lurched rather than ran and they didn't turn into zombies seconds after being infected by another zombie.
People who are fans of zombie fiction (myself included) are sticklers for detail and the majority of us hated the introduction of the running zombies in the Dawn '04 remake. They were alright in the dark comedy style setting that was "Return Of The Living Dead" from 1985, but not in a movie which takes zombies seriously (as funny as that sounds).

"The ambling zombies are still real to me, dammit!"
  World War Z was a great read.  As George Romero said in a recent interview "fast zombies suck".
I just grabbed World War Z, based on these posts.  I also agree with Romero

I thought the fast zombies were good in "Zombieland", which I enjoyed a lot.

I liked Zombieland too, but it wasn't exactly presented as a straight-up zombie movie.

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tofu_chipmunk wrote: stone2k wrote: mike3775 wrote: thunderbolt wrote: tofu_chipmunk wrote: carpetbeggar wrote: tamalie wrote: I also fell into reading "World War Z". The story is set a decade or so after the end of a global war against zombies and written in an interview style with various people who lived through it. It probably sounds ridiculous reading that synopsis, but within the context of the book it works. There's a lot of social and political commentary mixed in, some obvious, some less so. It's being made into a movie starring Brad Pitt. Some fans of the book are outraged that the storytelling vehicle is being dramatically changed for the film, but unless someone shot the book as a documentary, I don't know what else a studio could do.

Excellent choice Tamalie. One of the main outrages coming out of the movie is the fact that in some teasers that people have seen of the movie and of discussions by people who played minor parts in the movie is that these aren't your typical zombies. They are more in the vein of the '28 Days Later' and 'Dawn Of The Dead '04' creatures where they "turn" almost instantly after being infected and are like "track star" zombies in that they are of the "running" variety as opposed to the traditional George Romeroesque type zombies which are "shamblers."
In the book, the author Max Brooks had the Romero style zombies, that lurched rather than ran and they didn't turn into zombies seconds after being infected by another zombie.
People who are fans of zombie fiction (myself included) are sticklers for detail and the majority of us hated the introduction of the running zombies in the Dawn '04 remake. They were alright in the dark comedy style setting that was "Return Of The Living Dead" from 1985, but not in a movie which takes zombies seriously (as funny as that sounds).

"The ambling zombies are still real to me, dammit!"
  World War Z was a great read.  As George Romero said in a recent interview "fast zombies suck".
I just grabbed World War Z, based on these posts.  I also agree with Romero

I thought the fast zombies were good in "Zombieland", which I enjoyed a lot.

I liked Zombieland too, but it wasn't exactly presented as a straight-up zombie movie.
In a way it was.  I liked Zombieland, just hated the fast zombies

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Famous Mortimer wrote:
I keep meaning to buy Gary Hart's book. Recommendations?


Best book that I have read on wrestling. Period.

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Count Grog wrote:
yellowdog wrote:
Just finished The Destroyer's book. I have to admit I was a little disappointed. Too much of life outside of the ring and not enough about his wrestling career and inside the ring for me. I think the author having little knowledge of pro wrestling didn't help.
I was planning to get it but not worth it? Thats what I thought of Angelo Moscas book, too much Canadian Football too little wrestling


It didn't have all the detail on his career that I had hoped, but I was not disappointed in the book at all. It was worth the price, IMO.

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Count Grog wrote:
yellowdog wrote:
Just finished The Destroyer's book. I have to admit I was a little disappointed. Too much of life outside of the ring and not enough about his wrestling career and inside the ring for me. I think the author having little knowledge of pro wrestling didn't help.
I was planning to get it but not worth it? Thats what I thought of Angelo Moscas book, too much Canadian Football too little wrestling


No it's probably worth it. i don't regret buying it or taking the time to read it. I just wanted more about his wrestling career and less personal stuff. Im taking mine to Vegas to get Dick to sign it. he'll probably be selling them there. If you don't want to bjuy it you can borrow mine after I get Dick to sign it.

Last edited on Sat Feb 11th, 2012 01:51 am by yellowdog

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Famous Mortimer wrote:
I keep meaning to buy Gary Hart's book. Recommendations?

 

After racing through that crime book last night, I'm thinking of cracking on with page 300+ of the 1500 page JFK book I have, or the one which just arrived from Amazon, on the late night TV wars, Conan and Jay Leno and suchlike. The moment's passed now, and Conan has shown himself to be every bit as lazy as Dave and Jay (although still funnier than either), but it still might be worth a read.


great, great... one of the best wrestling books ever

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yellowdog wrote: Famous Mortimer wrote:
I keep meaning to buy Gary Hart's book. Recommendations?

 

After racing through that crime book last night, I'm thinking of cracking on with page 300+ of the 1500 page JFK book I have, or the one which just arrived from Amazon, on the late night TV wars, Conan and Jay Leno and suchlike. The moment's passed now, and Conan has shown himself to be every bit as lazy as Dave and Jay (although still funnier than either), but it still might be worth a read.


great, great... one of the best wrestling books ever

How many pages does Gary Hart's book come in at?

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I liked Beyer's book because I enjoyed reading about his entire life. The Gary Hart book kicks all sorts of ass and I wasn't even a huge fan of Gary Hart.

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carpetbeggar wrote:
yellowdog wrote: Famous Mortimer wrote:
I keep meaning to buy Gary Hart's book. Recommendations?

 

After racing through that crime book last night, I'm thinking of cracking on with page 300+ of the 1500 page JFK book I have, or the one which just arrived from Amazon, on the late night TV wars, Conan and Jay Leno and suchlike. The moment's passed now, and Conan has shown himself to be every bit as lazy as Dave and Jay (although still funnier than either), but it still might be worth a read.


great, great... one of the best wrestling books ever

How many pages does Gary Hart's book come in at?


a little over 400

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Started reading "Sworn on the Altar of God: A Religious Biography of Thomas Jefferson".  Decent but I've read so many of his personal letters that I know it all already and would rather read his own writings rather than someone paraphrasing him.  Still, a good introduction for those interested who don't already know a lot about the subject matter.

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Man In The Music : The Creative Life & Work of Michael Jackson by Joseph Vogul

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Just picked up " Flyer'd Up"  Trivia, Facts, and Anecdotes For Fans Of The Orange And Black.   I might try to pick up a Book or 2 by Bill James.

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I generally read the mystery/thriller genre with an occasional wrestling book or bio/autobio tossed in for flavor. I stay way from the True Crime genre. The only book I ever read that might be considered True Crime by some is the Chris Benoit book Ring of Hell. However I picked up a True Crime book last week called In The Still Of The Night by Ann Rule. Excellent book about the death of Ronda Reynolds which was first ruled a suicide then changed to a murder several years after the fact. Ronda's killer still remains at large. If you want to learn more about her story, google Ronda Reynolds Washington. 

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clawmaster wrote: I generally read the mystery/thriller genre with an occasional wrestling book or bio/autobio tossed in for flavor. I stay way from the True Crime genre. The only book I ever read that might be considered True Crime by some is the Chris Benoit book Ring of Hell. However I picked up a True Crime book last week called In The Still Of The Night by Ann Rule. Excellent book about the death of Ronda Reynolds which was first ruled a suicide then changed to a murder several years after the fact. Ronda's killer still remains at large. If you want to learn more about her story, google Ronda Reynolds Washington. 
Some true crime books are good.  I still love reading Helter Skelter every so often

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Just started "Wolf: The Lives of Jack London" by Jas. Healy.  Pretty good so far.

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clawmaster wrote: I generally read the mystery/thriller genre with an occasional wrestling book or bio/autobio tossed in for flavor. I stay way from the True Crime genre. The only book I ever read that might be considered True Crime by some is the Chris Benoit book Ring of Hell. However I picked up a True Crime book last week called In The Still Of The Night by Ann Rule. Excellent book about the death of Ronda Reynolds which was first ruled a suicide then changed to a murder several years after the fact. Ronda's killer still remains at large. If you want to learn more about her story, google Ronda Reynolds Washington. 

Her book on Ted Bundy is an absolute classic as well.

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mike3775 wrote:
Some true crime books are good.  I still love reading Helter Skelter every so often


For the Thrill of It (Simon Baatz): Leopold and Loeb
And the Dead Shall Rise (Steve Oney): Leo Frank
The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher (Kate Summerscale): Murder of Saville Kent in 1860s England
Thou Shalt Not Kill (Mary S. Ryzuk): John List in the 1970s
In Cold Blood (Truman Capote): Clutter massacre in Holcomb, KS. This is a novel, but Capote did extensive interviews with the condemned.

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Hammer to Fall wrote: mike3775 wrote:
Some true crime books are good.  I still love reading Helter Skelter every so often


For the Thrill of It (Simon Baatz): Leopold and Loeb
And the Dead Shall Rise (Steve Oney): Leo Frank
The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher (Kate Summerscale): Murder of Saville Kent in 1860s England
Thou Shalt Not Kill (Mary S. Ryzuk): John List in the 1970s
In Cold Blood (Truman Capote): Clutter massacre in Holcomb, KS. This is a novel, but Capote did extensive interviews with the condemned.

I recently read an anthology put together by Harold Schechter that featured true crime writing dating back to the 17th century.  Some pieces were good, some were almost unreadable, but it's a good cross-section of murder writing.  And I found out that an axe to the head was the preferred murder method until about the 20th century.

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Bump. Someone sticky this fucker, it's a good reference tool when I'm looking for something to read (on those rare occasions when I think I have time).

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khawk wrote: Bump. Someone sticky this fucker, it's a good reference tool when I'm looking for something to read (on those rare occasions when I think I have time).
Done.

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khawk wrote:
Bump. Someone sticky this fucker, it's a good reference tool when I'm looking for something to read (on those rare occasions when I think I have time).

You might also want to set up an account with Goodreads, you haven't already. It has a recommendation system, based on your likes.

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Hammer to Fall wrote: khawk wrote:
Bump. Someone sticky this fucker, it's a good reference tool when I'm looking for something to read (on those rare occasions when I think I have time).

You might also want to set up an account with Goodreads, you haven't already. It has a recommendation system, based on your likes.
thanks for the link

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Just finished up Robert Graves' I, Claudius. For the first time ever, I actually enjoyed reading about ancient Rome. Do not tick off emperors or their wives.

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“The Road Warriors: Danger, Death & the Rush of Wrestling”
"Undisputed: How to Become the World Champion in 1372 Easy Steps"

Last edited on Tue Feb 28th, 2012 04:56 am by Road Warrior Yajuta

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Two books I recently read are,

"Harpo Speaks" by Harpo Marx. I read Groucho's book last year and wanted to read Harpo's. I'm a Marx Brother's fan, so I enjoyed both books. Who would have thought that two brothers who were a year apart and grew up in the same environment, would be so different. I would have never guessed that Harpo would have been the way he was off stage.

"Secret Servant" by Dan Silva. Silva has become one of my favorite writers. Any one else read his books?

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On the way home from Chicago, I stopped at the Barnes & Noble book store in Bradley. I had two 50 dollar X Mas gift cards to use. I ended up buying 5 paperback mystery/thriller books, Baseball Prospectus 2012 and the Autobiography of Mark Twain. I did a term paper on Mark Twain my junior year in high school so I'm really looking forward to reading his autobiography. The bill was $101.12. So minus the $100 in gift cards, I paid $1.20 for 7 books.

Egger,

I'm not going to be able to make the Kenny Jay benefit this year. It was a pleasure meeting you there last year. ChiTownRich and I were talking about going to a White Sox game this year. If Rich is able to get a bunch of Sox vs Twins tickets, maybe some of you Minnesota guys can come to Chicago for a game.

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Just finished reading "The Psychopath Test" by Jon Ronson. It's about, a bit, the worldwide mental health industry, but also a really funny book about psychopathy and the attempts to measure and treat it. Absolutely worth a read.

I then tried "Unfamiliar Fishes" by Sarah Vowell, about the history of Hawaii. It was interesting in a way, but I realised about halfway in that I didn't really give a damn - one awful political / religious system replaced by one which wasn't much better.

Next up, I'll be picking up "Reclaiming History" by Vincent Bugliosi, about the assassination of JFK, from page 300, where I left it before Christmas. It's 1500 pages long, with a CD-rom containing 900 pages of endnotes, so I'll probably stick with it for a while. Or I might read one of the baseball books I picked up recently - "Glory In The Fall", a collection of famous articles about the World Series.

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The Happiness Of Pursuit-Davis Phinney's autobiography, pretty good so far.

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srossi wrote:
Haven't had a good book thread in 6 months to a year.  I've been going through about a book a week. 

Just finished reading an anthology of the four main Sherlock Holmes novels that make up the primary canon: "A Study in Scarlet" (1887), "The Sign of the Four" (1890), "The Hound of the Baskervilles" (1901), and "The Valley of Fear" (1914).  Excellent reads and so different and more clever than these stupid Robert Downey, Jr. movies. 

Now I'm finally getting around to reading Steven Adler's autobiography. 

Next up will be a biography on Eisenhower.  I'm not sure where I'll go from there but looking for any good fiction or non-fiction suggestions.


I've been reading the Sherlock Holmes series as well, although not all in a row. I only left Valley of Fear left.

I just finished The Clue of the Twisted Candle by Edgar Wallace, which is the first book I've read on my new Kindle Fire. I got the Kindle so I could read public domain books for free, but I'll never give up on regular old fashioned physical books. I'd heard a lot about Edgar Wallace (he's responsible for conceptualizing King Kong, if you didn't know), and this was my first venture into his actual work, although I had seen a number of movies based on his work. The book was pretty good, although the third quarter was a bit disjointed. He blends horror and mystery perfectly.

Next I'm planning on reading The Chinese Parrot by Earl Derr Biggers, the second in his Charlie Chan series. I already read the first, where Chan is a minor character, and really enjoyed it, so I've been planning on getting to this one for some time. I've been on a bit of a mystery kick lately, although my trur love is horror.

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I've got the complete Sherlock Holmes sat on my shelf, ready for a quiet few weeks in the future. At the moment it's the first two volumes of "League of Extraordinary Gentlemen", which is really good and I ought to have read it before now. Next up is "Rubicon", an apparently very readable history of Rome's experiment with a Republic.

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Just finished "Union 1812" about the War of 1812, which was just phenomenal and incredibly detailed.  Great info about both the politics and the battles that made up the war.

Now I'm alternating between Jules Verne's classic "Around the World in 80 Days", which I should be able to get through in just a few days, and Keith Richards' autobiography "Life", which is very long and detailed, perhaps too much so.

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I've read "Cross Rhodes" by Dustin Rhodes. It was ok for a quick read. Not much new or any good stories. His program with Scott Hall was interesting. He credits Savio Vega with really getting Golddust over. Dustin also had quite the daddy issues. He loved his daddy and hid daddy loved him, but his daddy was never around and Dustin wanted to be with his daddy.


I have also read "Jerusalem, Jerusalem" by James Carroll. Not the best read. The writer seems to be all over the place. He must have ADD.

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clawmaster wrote:

Egger,

I'm not going to be able to make the Kenny Jay benefit this year. It was a pleasure meeting you there last year. ChiTownRich and I were talking about going to a White Sox game this year. If Rich is able to get a bunch of Sox vs Twins tickets, maybe some of you Minnesota guys can come to Chicago for a game.


I'm not sure I will be going to the Jay benefit either. I will keep in mind the White Sox game.

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Just started reading Voltaire's "Candide, ou l'Optimisme" on a whim, and it's very good and actually pretty funny.  I want to go through a bunch of the enlightenment writers now, and will no doubt read some Locke next.

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Stephen Tyler's biography. Much like his personality, it's all over the place. He's not so burnt out that he cannot recall details (he's actually very good at this) but he's all over the road.
I'm now up to the point he and Aerosmith are making their first album. I'm hoping it becomes more focused............

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Tough Shit: Life Advice from a Fat, Lazy Slob Who Did Good by Kevin Smith

Finished the first 100 pages or so. Very hot and cold. When he is on, it is laugh out loud funny but then he starts to ramble on about nothing and I lose interest. The chapter about his run in with Bruce Willis on the set of Cop Out and great.

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I just got "Voices from the Great Black Baseball Leagues" by John Holway.

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Just finished "Spaceman: The Bill Lee Story", one of the better '70's era baseball exposes. Lee is an interesting character to say the least.

Now I'm reading "A Season on the Brink" by John Feinstein. Very good read. Bobby Knight is a very complex character.

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Just started "Red Badge of Courage", never read it before but wanted to for many years.

And I'm halfway through "The Declaration of Independents: How Libertarian Politics Can Fix What's Wrong with America" which has a lot of interesting stories in it involving everyone from Bill James to The Velvet Underground, but it's a little rambling and not the best written book.

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srossi wrote: Just started "Red Badge of Courage", never read it before but wanted to for many years.

And I'm halfway through "The Declaration of Independents: How Libertarian Politics Can Fix What's Wrong with America" which has a lot of interesting stories in it involving everyone from Bill James to The Velvet Underground, but it's a little rambling and not the best written book.


The Red Badge of Courage is a great book. 

Are the schematics for Libertarian Land included in the other book?

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tofu_chipmunk wrote: srossi wrote: Just started "Red Badge of Courage", never read it before but wanted to for many years.

And I'm halfway through "The Declaration of Independents: How Libertarian Politics Can Fix What's Wrong with America" which has a lot of interesting stories in it involving everyone from Bill James to The Velvet Underground, but it's a little rambling and not the best written book.


The Red Badge of Courage is a great book. 

Are the schematics for Libertarian Land included in the other book?

There's a map to it, but it's just an arrow pointing up.

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Reading Dylan Ratigan's Greedy Bastards right now. 

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gwlee7 wrote: Reading Dylan Ratigan's Greedy Bastards right now. 
I think that's just the subtitle to Rossi's Libertarian book.

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tofu_chipmunk wrote: gwlee7 wrote: Reading Dylan Ratigan's Greedy Bastards right now. 
I think that's just the subtitle to Rossi's Libertarian book.

Maybe but Ratigan is spot on about how all of the weatlh is being extracted out of the country by the huge multinational corporations.

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gwlee7 wrote: tofu_chipmunk wrote: gwlee7 wrote: Reading Dylan Ratigan's Greedy Bastards right now. 
I think that's just the subtitle to Rossi's Libertarian book.

Maybe but Ratigan is spot on about how all of the weatlh is being extracted out of the country by the huge multinational corporations.


How is the book in regards to how it is written?  Same stuff from his show or more indepth?  I love how he gives hell to both parties. 

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Papa Voo wrote: gwlee7 wrote: tofu_chipmunk wrote: gwlee7 wrote: Reading Dylan Ratigan's Greedy Bastards right now. 
I think that's just the subtitle to Rossi's Libertarian book.

Maybe but Ratigan is spot on about how all of the weatlh is being extracted out of the country by the huge multinational corporations.


How is the book in regards to how it is written?  Same stuff from his show or more indepth?  I love how he gives hell to both parties. 

More in depth but still not "superly deep" if that makes any sense.  It's not scholarly but still well thought out.  Definitely passionate.  It's decent and worth reading IMO.

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Currently reading a thriller called Adrenaline by Jeff Abbott. Excellent book so far. The latest twist fooled me. A bad ending would ruin the book though. 

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Team 7 Eleven:The complete history of the 7 Eleven cycling team

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Y: The Last Man by Brian K. Vaughn

Started this comic series a few nights ago and ran through the first 6 issues. Good stuff.

For some unknown reason, every man in the world, except 1, simultaneously died. The women have started some Lord of the Flies shit with a group of "Amazons" cutting off one of their tits and causing much mayhem. The story so far has the lone surviving male finding his mother, a senator, and the new "President of the United States" who was formerly the Secretary of Agriculture. Word of the surviving male has made it to the Amazons. The male survivor's sister has joined the Amazons and has been given the job of finding the male survivor and bringing him to the Amazon leader.

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Halfway through another classic, "The Age of Innocence".

Just started reading a really bizarre book that I stumbled upon at the library that will no doubt appeal to everyone's sensibility here.  "I Have Fun Everywhere I Go: Savage Tales of pot, Porn, Punk Rock, Pro Wrestling, Talking Apes, Evil Bosses, Dirty Blues, American Heroes, and the Most Notorious Magazines in the World" by Mike Edison. 

With a title like that, how could I not pick it up?  Anyone remember this Mike Edison guy?  He was the editor of "Wrestling's Main Event", one of the non-Apter mags of the mid-'80s, and then he went on to be editor for "High Times".  In between he somehow played drums in a punk band that opened for The Ramones, Sonic Youth, and Soundgarden, among others.  I'm only a few chapters in but there's some crazy stories in here.

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Finished Pipers book, what a piece of shit

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Marvel Classic What If Volume 5
Marvel Super Hero Team Up

Also been re-reading the Potter books. I am on The Half Blood Prince right now.

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Finished the latest George R.R. Martin Wild Cards novel "Fort Freak." Now I'm reading the novelization of DC comics' Countdown crossover by Greg Cox.

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Last 3:
Steven Tylers Autobiography-he's insane.

Ray Manzarek's Autiobiography-he tells a good story of the Doors and in particular hates Oliver Stone. He is WAY too descriptive of his early sexual escapades to the point I skipped to where he meets Morrison.

Keith Richards Autobiography-"Life: So far, very good. I'm at about page 130 and they are just hitting it big. Very cool fact was the Beatles gave the Stones their first song "I Wanna Be Your Man" but it was recorded and made a hit by Maryanne Faithfull first.
Other facts:
-they and the Beatles were tight and would call each other to space out their upcoming singles
-they were not inclined to write songs until their manager forced Keith & Mick into a kitchen one night and wouldn't let them out until. They walked out with "As Tears Go By".
-Brian Jones could not write songs.

More to come...........

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Dick Beyers book

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I'm on the fourth book of Bernard Cornwell's "Richard Sharpe" novels. I got into them a couple months ago and like I said I am now on the 4th in the series of I think 21 as of now called "Sharpe's Trafalgar."
This is from the same author of the book "The Fort" which I reccommended in this thread a few months ago.
Some may be familiar with the Richard Sharpe character from the the series of movies the BBC(I believe) made in the 90's and were shown here in North America on PBS. It is great historical fiction about Sharpe's rise through the British Army and the battles they had in India and Europe in the early 1800's. Great reading.

I'm also ready to start the second book in the trilogy of horror novels written in the last couple years by Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan. The first book was released in '09 I believe and the third just came out I believe at the end of '11. It is a story about a virus plague which turns people into vampires that starts in Manhattan and quickly spreads around the world. It follows a doctor and his assistant from the CDC who team up with a NYC rat catcher and a old man who owns a pawn shop and has vast knowledge on the vampires and how the virus spreads after first encountering them when he was a prisoner in the concentration camps of WWII.
Really great reading so far and as I said I'm starting the second volume tonight.

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srossi wrote: Just started reading a really bizarre book that I stumbled upon at the library that will no doubt appeal to everyone's sensibility here.  "I Have Fun Everywhere I Go: Savage Tales of pot, Porn, Punk Rock, Pro Wrestling, Talking Apes, Evil Bosses, Dirty Blues, American Heroes, and the Most Notorious Magazines in the World" by Mike Edison. 

With a title like that, how could I not pick it up?  Anyone remember this Mike Edison guy?  He was the editor of "Wrestling's Main Event", one of the non-Apter mags of the mid-'80s, and then he went on to be editor for "High Times".  In between he somehow played drums in a punk band that opened for The Ramones, Sonic Youth, and Soundgarden, among others.  I'm only a few chapters in but there's some crazy stories in here.

Just finished this book yesterday and for the handful who have taken book recommendations from me before, trust me, this is one you will enjoy.  If GG Allin and Al Goldstein stories, mixd with a healthy dose of toking up with Rob Van Dam after ECW shows, are your idea of a good time, you'll want to check this out.  And it's actually a really well-written book with polysyllabic words and everything, something hard to come by when reading about porn, punk, pot, and wrestling.

Last edited on Thu Jun 7th, 2012 03:20 pm by srossi

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The China Study. It's truly an interesting book if one is interested in the subject of cancer prevention. It's a rather easy read with some good graphs.

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just finished a very good novel, EXILE, by Richard North Patterson that deal with an accused mastermind of a suicide bombing involving the Palestinians and Isreal and the United States, and the jewish lawyer assigned to defend the accused.

Patterson's books are fiction but are pageturners that are hard to put down, you want to keep reading just to see what happens next, even if it is 3 AM and you have to work the next day.

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srossi wrote: srossi wrote: Just started reading a really bizarre book that I stumbled upon at the library that will no doubt appeal to everyone's sensibility here.  "I Have Fun Everywhere I Go: Savage Tales of pot, Porn, Punk Rock, Pro Wrestling, Talking Apes, Evil Bosses, Dirty Blues, American Heroes, and the Most Notorious Magazines in the World" by Mike Edison. 

With a title like that, how could I not pick it up?  Anyone remember this Mike Edison guy?  He was the editor of "Wrestling's Main Event", one of the non-Apter mags of the mid-'80s, and then he went on to be editor for "High Times".  In between he somehow played drums in a punk band that opened for The Ramones, Sonic Youth, and Soundgarden, among others.  I'm only a few chapters in but there's some crazy stories in here.

Just finished this book yesterday and for the handful who have taken book recommendations from me before, trust me, this is one you will enjoy.  If GG Allin and Al Goldstein stories, mixd with a healthy dose of toking up with Rob Van Dam after ECW shows, are your idea of a good time, you'll want to check this out.  And it's actually a really well-written book with polysyllabic words and everything, something hard to come by when reading about porn, punk, pot, and wrestling.

This book is definitely right up my alley(besides the pot smoking) and I'm totally intrigued now. Thanks for the heads up about this book Rossi.

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Just started reading the Hitchhikers Guide to the Universe books, currently on the second book now(Restaurant at the end of the Universe)

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mike3775 wrote: Just started reading the Hitchhikers Guide to the Universe books, currently on the second book now(Restaurant at the end of the Universe)

These are great books, read them all a number of years ago.

Right now I'm halfway through "The Ascent of George Washington", which is pretty fascinating and will make you think differently about him, for better and worse.  I also just started "Hunted Down: The Detective Stories of Charles Dickens", which should be a fun read.

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Essential Wolverine Volume 3
The Many Armors of Iron Man
Classic What If? Volume 2



Books a million has a crazy deal where they have many TPB for $5.

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Just bought and am reading a book called "Corpus Juris Humorous" which isn't so much a work of authorship, but a collection of reported appellate court rulings which, mostly because of the absurdity of the subjects or  the issues presented by 'esteemed' counsel, are inherently funny.   May be a vanity press thing, but I find myself laughing regularly.

Count Grog
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finished Dick beyers book, it was ok

finishing david Crosby's book that I started 5-10 years ago

then waiting in the wings in Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter

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thunderbolt wrote: Just bought and am reading a book called "Corpus Juris Humorous" which isn't so much a work of authorship, but a collection of reported appellate court rulings which, mostly because of the absurdity of the subjects or  the issues presented by 'esteemed' counsel, are inherently funny.   May be a vanity press thing, but I find myself laughing regularly.

I don't read many legal books, but a number of years back I read "The Smoking Gun: Day by Day Through a Shocking Murder Trial with Gerry Spence" and thought it was excellent. 

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100 pages into "The Art of Fielding", a baseball novel by first-time author Chad Harbach that wound up on the best-seller list in 2011.  I have mixed feelings on it so far but it's worth checking out. 

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Recently finished Jose Canseco's two books. He seemed to repeat himself often, but I still enjoyed the books.
Was at the Jays game on Saturday and there were a bunch of homers. My daughter asked me if anyone hit one out of the stadium (LOL) but I showed her where Jose hit one in the top deck when he was with the A's.

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I was at the KC library last week and wandered over to the sports section where they have some wrestling and boxing books. Borrowed the Road Warriors book by Laurinaitis. I'm about 140 pages in. It's not great/ not terrible. Some interesting stories so far about Georgia and the AWA. Just about to start on their move to Crockett.

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Reading Kafka's "The Trial" right now.  Just picked it up on a whim, I had never read anything of his except for "The Metamorphosis" of course.  I like this better.

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Just finished reading Anvil's biography, which is very similar to their excellent documentary. Many road stories and names dropped. Quick, fun read.

Currently about halfway thru "I Heard You Paint Houses" which is based on the story of Frank "The Irishman" Sheeran, who was involved with Jimmy Hoffa and the Teamsters. Excellent book so far. I read online that supposedly Deniro and Scorsese will be bringing this to the big screen, which would be amazing.

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still on Abrham Lincoln Vampire Hunter

srossi

 

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Just finished Dave Mustaine's autobiography (good read, doesn't come off nearly as crazy as I thought he would) and I also am reading "Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter" now.

Last edited on Thu Aug 30th, 2012 03:51 pm by srossi

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Just read The Life And Times of Muhammad Ali by Thomas Hauser for the second time. It's a better read the second time than the first and it was a great read the first time.

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Just finished "Disease-Proof Your Child" by Joel Furman.

 

Truly an excellent book. It shows jaw-dropping stats on many ailment that afflict the general population today, especially our children. It truly pushed fruits and veggies with every meal.

 

He has another book which I'll soon read called Eat To Live. Unlike the Fatkins diet, people lose weight, keep it off, and remain healthy.

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X Wing Mercy Kill
The Mark of Athena
Shadows of the Empire
Darth Maul Shadow Hunter

srossi

 

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Just started "The Gods of Gotham", a novel based in NY in the 1840s using the Great Fire of 1845 and the Irish Potato Famine as a backdrop for a story about the formation of the NYPD and a rookie cop.  Pretty good read so far.

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Currently on book 6 of the William Shatner Star Trek books. After I am done with them, I'm moving onto his Tek War novels

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just read Rudy Sarzo's 'Off the rails" , memoir of touring with Ozzy and Randy, good read if you're a fan and were around on those tours

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Read God and Generals by Jeff Shaara.
Almost Done with The killer Angels by Michael Shaara

Next to Read
The Last Full Measure & A Blaze of Glory by Jeff Shaara

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"Tales From Development Hell", a book comprised of 12 stories of films that never made it, or had bizarre long paths from the first script to the finished film. It was written in 2003/4 so there's some stuff that's out of date (they talk about Total Recall 2, for one, as Arnie was up for doing it until 1999 or so), but it's a fun read.

Then, back onto the complete Edgar Allan Poe. I just finished the poetry section, and while there's not a lot to like (aside from the classics, obviously) I'm really looking forward to the stories.

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Just finished Brock Lesnar's autobiography "DeathClutch", written with Paul Heyman.  Very disappointing.  A poorly written pamphlet that I made it through in 3 sittings. 

To cleanse my pallet of that, I just started simultaneously working my way through 2 much heavier books.  The first is a coffee-table book called "Picturing New York: The City From Its Beginnings to the Present".  The second is called "What Ifs? of American History: Eminent Historians Imagine What Might Have Been".  Both interesting reads so far, although the latter is a bit dry and scholarly and I've read some more entertaining alternate realities in the past.   

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Just started "Darwin's Armada: Four Voyages and the Battle for the Theory of Evolution".  Seems interesting.

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Just finished Y: The Last Man series (60 issues/10 TPBs) by Brian K. Vaughn. Excellent read. I understand that a movie adaptation has been in the works since 2007 and they are currently looking for a director.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Y_The_Last_Man

Just revisited Preacher by Garth Ennis.

From Wikipedia...

Preacher tells the story of Jesse Custer, a preacher in the small Texas town of Annville. Custer was accidentally possessed by the supernatural creature named Genesis in an incident which killed his entire congregation and flattened his church.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preacher_%28comics%29

I am about 1/2 way through the 75 issue series.

There is some inter-mingling between the 2 series. The 2 main characters in each series own a zippo lighter with "Fuck Communism" engraved upon it. There are also a few brief shoutouts to Preacher in Y: The Last Man.

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Getting ready to start the Dragonlance Legends Trilogy again. Haven't read them in awhile.

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Just read the ESPN Book, "These Guys Have all the Fun". Took me a month since I can only read small bits at a time. Don't bother with it. A complete waste of time.

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I started reading "The Other Wes Moore, one name, two fates".  It describes the life of two young men, both from the same city and similar circumstances, and with the same name, who follow divergent paths toward astonishingly different destinies. One Wes Moore grew up to be a Rhodes Scholar, decorated combat veteran, White House Fellow, and business leader. The other Wes Moore is serving a life sentence in prison for felony murder.

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mike3775 wrote: I started reading "The Other Wes Moore, one name, two fates".  It describes the life of two young men, both from the same city and similar circumstances, and with the same name, who follow divergent paths toward astonishingly different destinies. One Wes Moore grew up to be a Rhodes Scholar, decorated combat veteran, White House Fellow, and business leader. The other Wes Moore is serving a life sentence in prison for felony murder.
I finished this book and I have to say, it was a good read.  I was surprised how open the prisoner and his family were in discussing his childhood with this guy.

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Robert Caro's The Master of the Senate

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Just finished Peter Criss' autobiography "Makeup to Breakup". What a fucking whiner.

- Implies that Paul and Ace are bisexual, and thinks he may have gotten a drug-induced blow job from Ace.
- Put a gun in his mouth and nearly pulled the trigger after the Northridge earthquake destroyed his apartment.
- Spent time in a psychiatric hospital.
- Says that Paul and Gene pretty much hate each other, and get along only to keep the band together.
- Claims he got screwed money-wise at every turn on the Reunion tours. He got 10 percent to Ace's 20 percent, the reason given was that Ace once won an award from Guitar magazine.

etc. etc.

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Just started "The Last Testament: A Memoir by God" by David Javerbaum.  Absolutely hilarious spoof of the Bible in the form of God's updated autobiography.  Almost every page has at least one laugh-out-loud line.

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Winter of the World by Follet. So far, it is OK. Not as good as Fall of Giants. It feels much more superficial. It is entertaining though.

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Just finished up The Legend of Drizzt Book I: Homeland by R.A. Salvatore. I have resolved to read all 16 books in the series this year.


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Neil Young Biography FAQ

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I just finished Derek Sandersons autobiography Crossing The Line... didn't like it too much. It seemed there could have been a ton of good stories, but he either didn't remember them or is embarrassed by them, so he didn't tell.

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Someone at work gave me "Life of Pi" for Christmas so I decided to steamroll through it these past few days.  I'm on the last few pages now.  Not at all the type of book that I usually read as fiction for the masses generally repulses me like a Michael Bay movie.  "Life of Pi" isn't all that different although the author has a certain way of painting a picture.  There's something to be said for being able to write 300 pages where nothing happens for 250 of them.  That said, it's just a kid on a boat with a tiger for a year, so yeah, it's pretty fucking boring.  And the writing leaves something to be desired, especially at the beginning and the end where there's dialogue (writing believable dialogue is not easy and this guy is atrocious at it).  There's some eye-rolling moments where you know something could never happen in a million years, which is unfortunate because so much of the book relies on painstaking attention to detail in an effort to make it realistic, and then that illusion gets blown out of the water (no pun intended) 3 or 4 times when something absurd happens.  It's fine for what it is and this guy made millions selling the story to Hollywood, but he's a middle-of-the-road writer and this book did nothing to change my mind about fiction "best-sellers".     

Last edited on Wed Jan 16th, 2013 08:58 pm by srossi

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Reading "Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power" by Jon Meacham, maybe the best TJ book I've ever read, and I've read close to 50 of them.  Highly possible recommendation to anyone with even the slightest interest in this area. 

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Martha Hart's book

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Just finished Babe by Robert Creamer. For a book written 40 years ago, it is the best bio I have read of Babe Ruth.

Now reading Last Man by Vince Flynn. I read Flynn in between other stuff. Action oriented page turners. He absolutely leans right wing with his vision of the world but it is still decent stuff. Not for everyone.

Last edited on Sat Jan 26th, 2013 05:56 pm by Ultimark

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srossi wrote: Reading "Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power" by Jon Meacham, maybe the best TJ book I've ever read, and I've read close to 50 of them.  Highly possible recommendation to anyone with even the slightest interest in this area. 
I didn't see this post, Rossi, but I agree it is very good. Focus on a style or driving force, rather than a period in the life a la Dumas Malone books or A Road to Monticello (a bit drawn out - what did you think of it Rossi?); or a life-long view like American Sphinx (which is also quite good). Meacham is an interesting guy.

Last edited on Tue Feb 12th, 2013 01:44 am by pjstef

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Now reading Katherine Graham's Washington.

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Later this week, I'm going to re-read "The Dark Elf Trilogy" by R.A. Salvatore.

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pjstef wrote: srossi wrote: Reading "Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power" by Jon Meacham, maybe the best TJ book I've ever read, and I've read close to 50 of them.  Highly possible recommendation to anyone with even the slightest interest in this area. 
I didn't see this post, Rossi, but I agree it is very good. Focus on a style or driving force, rather than a period in the life a la Dumas Malone books or A Road to Monticello (a bit drawn out - what did you think of it Rossi?); or a life-long view like American Sphinx (which is also quite good). Meacham is an interesting guy.

I enjoyed all the books you mentioned, but since I've read so many on TJ I'm always looking for something a little different, and I'm not sure exactly what that is until I'm done.  With Meacham's book, it reads almost like a novel without losing any of the facts.  The chapter on Jefferson's death in particular is just amazing, I almost felt like I had just lost a loved one myself after reading it.  I don't know if there's many authors who have the talent to make you feel that close to a historical figure without going overboard and sensationalizing.  Meacham is very fair, doesn't put him on a pedestal, doesn't ignore his faults, doesn't try to tear him down or judge him by today's PC standards.  I would put the book ahead of all the others.  Not sure how a non-Jefferson fanatic reading his first TJ book would feel about that, but I'd imagine the book would appeal to them more too because it's written with a more conversational tone.  I've read all the Jefferson-Adams letters and a lot of minutia on him in 1700s vernacular and even I enjoyed the tone of this book more.

Last edited on Tue Feb 12th, 2013 01:59 am by srossi

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I agree.

In John Adams, McCullough tries to do the double death scene without being over-the-top - likewise Abigail's death scene. I also enjoy that book a lot and re-read parts here and there.

It's interesting in that back in the day (say biographies of the 20s, 30s and 40s) the styles were either overly fluffy - inflating the subject of the bio into a great person using a lot of exclamation points; or else somewhat arm's length, distant, like Malone, who was considered too much of a scholarly expert on TJ to treat the story too chummy.

Today, many books have the other problem you mention - judging through today's eyes. Books on TJ re: the slavery issue are real bad with this. Another instance = a friend asked me to read the book on FDR by Amity Schlaes, and that was how I felt. According to that book, FDR was not all he was propped up to be, because he got too involved in beauracracy, he extended the depression with his high tax rates, etc - all stuff a person of today would say looking back, after much time and analysis takes place in the interim; but at the time, brought about tremendous acclaim.

Gordon Wood does a very nice job keeping things in its own period, but is slightly dryer than Meacham. Have you read anything by Wood? Empire of Liberty goes a lot into TJ;s presidential years so I'd imagine you've seen that book.

Last edited on Tue Feb 12th, 2013 02:52 am by pjstef

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Chrisstlouis wrote:
Martha Hart's book

How did you like this? I couldn't even finish it I thought it was so bad.

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pjstef wrote: Gordon Wood does a very nice job keeping things in its own period, but is slightly dryer than Meacham. Have you read anything by Wood? Empire of Liberty goes a lot into TJ;s presidential years so I'd imagine you've seen that book.


I don't believe I have read Wood, although I'll have to check.  I don't always remember the authors.  I have "Empire of Liberty" in my bookcase but haven't read it yet as I try to mix in other topics, otherwise I'd read nothing but Revolutionary War books.  I jumped right to "Art of Power" though as I was looking forward to its release for a long time.  The only TJ book I won't read is David Barton's, which I'm sure you've heard about.  lol

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Just got through with Star Wars the Old Republic Revan.

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stone2k wrote: I just finished Derek Sandersons autobiography Crossing The Line... didn't like it too much. It seemed there could have been a ton of good stories, but he either didn't remember them or is embarrassed by them, so he didn't tell.

Reading this now. Very slow so far. From what I know of him, he should be embarassed about his stories, but thats why you write an autobiography dammit! Oh well, we'll see....

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Picked up Dave Mustaine's autobiography published in 2010 called "Mustaine" at the library today.

Co-authored by him and Joe Layden, who just happened to co-write the Rock's autobiography, "The Rock Says."

Haven't started reading it yet and I know there are some metal and Megadeth fans here so I'm wondering if anyone here has read it and what their opinion was of it?

I didn't go looking for it, but just saw it last week browsing the shelves and decided to grab it today.

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There are some wrestling books that can be downloaded here for free:

http://www.bookos.org

I didn't browse around to see what other books might be available.

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carpetbeggar wrote: Picked up Dave Mustaine's autobiography published in 2010 called "Mustaine" at the library today.

Co-authored by him and Joe Layden, who just happened to co-write the Rock's autobiography, "The Rock Says."

Haven't started reading it yet and I know there are some metal and Megadeth fans here so I'm wondering if anyone here has read it and what their opinion was of it?

I didn't go looking for it, but just saw it last week browsing the shelves and decided to grab it today.

I read it and its great until he discovers/rediscovers God. Then its the usual born again (not the Sabbath album) stuff....

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the squared circle wrote: carpetbeggar wrote: Picked up Dave Mustaine's autobiography published in 2010 called "Mustaine" at the library today.

Co-authored by him and Joe Layden, who just happened to co-write the Rock's autobiography, "The Rock Says."

Haven't started reading it yet and I know there are some metal and Megadeth fans here so I'm wondering if anyone here has read it and what their opinion was of it?

I didn't go looking for it, but just saw it last week browsing the shelves and decided to grab it today.

I read it and its great until he discovers/rediscovers God. Then its the usual born again (not the Sabbath album) stuff....

I thought it was a good read as well, but Mustaine is so full of himself that it is difficult to get through without rolling your fucking eyes out of your head.

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khawk wrote: There are some wrestling books that can be downloaded here for free:

http://www.bookos.org

I didn't browse around to see what other books might be available.


Thanks for that. I see they have that book on the history of NWA. I always want to read that one.

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brodiescomics wrote: the squared circle wrote: carpetbeggar wrote: Picked up Dave Mustaine's autobiography published in 2010 called "Mustaine" at the library today.

Co-authored by him and Joe Layden, who just happened to co-write the Rock's autobiography, "The Rock Says."

Haven't started reading it yet and I know there are some metal and Megadeth fans here so I'm wondering if anyone here has read it and what their opinion was of it?

I didn't go looking for it, but just saw it last week browsing the shelves and decided to grab it today.

I read it and its great until he discovers/rediscovers God. Then its the usual born again (not the Sabbath album) stuff....

I thought it was a good read as well, but Mustaine is so full of himself that it is difficult to get through without rolling your fucking eyes out of your head.

I read it too.  Thought it was a nice,easy read.  You take it with a grain of salt just as you would with any wrestling autobiography.  Anyone reading Mustaine's book knows that he's one of the biggest workers in music, so they shouldn't be surprised.  But there was actually a lot less bullshit than I thought there would be and even the born-again stuff wasn't as over-the-top as I expected, so I enjoyed it for what it was.

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I am reading Desperation, by Stephen King.  So far so good.

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Since Christmas, I have read Johnson and Oliver's "Heroes and Icons". All ways a pleasure to read their Hall of Fame books. I hope they continue with more.

Ole Anderson's "Inside Out: How Corporate America Destroyed Professional Wrestling". This one started out good. I like his telling of how he got into the bussines, his early days in the AWA, how he became an Anderson and his early days as booker. Then it got a little disturbing on how he like to hurt the "marks". The last half of the book got to be a little to much on how everyone was against Ole. I wish he would have had more stories of the old days in it. I don't think he even mentioned the Four Horsemen.

I also read "Map of Bones" by James Rollins. I probably will not pickup any more of his books.

Last edited on Thu Feb 21st, 2013 10:34 pm by justahamandegger

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justahamandegger wrote: Since Christmas, I have read Johnson and Oliver's "Heroes and Icons". All ways a pleasure to read their Hall of Fame books. I hope they continue with more.

I'm slowly working my way through this too as some light reading in between some other books.  As always, very informative, but I think this is the weakest of the series.  Comes across more like a bunch of columns slapped together than a real book.  The profiles of the stars are of dramatically different lengths and styles.  There's no internal "style guide", so to speak.  Some profiles concentrate entirely on a minor detail or personal life and say next-to-nothing about the star's actual career.  Others are more comprehensive and along the lines of what you would expect. 

And the cover is super odd - a blurry picture of CM Punk where a huge white Alberto Del Rio sign in the background and the backs of fans' heads in the foreground are more visible than Punk is.  Punk obviously isn't one of the top "heroes" listed, and even if they just needed to use a current guy to sell more books, you'd think they'd use John Cena or at least get a better picture of Punk.

Things about it come across as amateurish, as opposed to the "Heels" and "Tag Teams" books which seemed more polished.  Maybe they had production problems of some sort.  But a lot of information is there if you can get past the presentation. 


Last edited on Tue Feb 26th, 2013 03:08 pm by srossi

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I'm just about to start "Anything Goes: A Biography of the Roaring Twenties" by Lucy Moore.

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If I Never Get Back

Daryl Brock

I read this over 20 years ago and had to do it again. A fantastic book in many ways. Anyone who is a fan of history, baseball, Mark Twain and just a great story will love this book. Not available in Kindle or Nook so the (for me) small print is making it a very long read but I am enjoying it.

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Legacy of Ashes- The History of the CIA
               by Tim Weiner

What the Internet Is Doing To Our Brains
               by Nicholas Carr (case study: S&W Forums)

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yellowdog wrote:
Legacy of Ashes- The History of the CIA
               by Tim Weiner

What the Internet Is Doing To Our Brains
               by Nicholas Carr (case study: S&W Forums)



Most of us didn't start out that gifted anyway.

katook



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I've been reading the Gme of Thrones series, juts started on book #3, the books are very similar to, but yet different from, the HBO series.

Much darker in the books.

srossi

 

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Finished "I Ain't Got Time to Bleed" by Jesse Ventura in 2 days.  I've been meaning to read that book for almost 10 years.  It's only 200 pages so it's a very quick read.  One relatively long chapter is dedicated to his wrestling career, but it's mostly about his political platform with a lot of Navy SEAL stories mixed in.  I enjoyed it for what it was. 

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khawk wrote: There are some wrestling books that can be downloaded here for free:

http://www.bookos.org

I didn't browse around to see what other books might be available.

I have been using this site often since you posted it, and absolutly love it... thanks for sharing.

srossi

 

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Reading F. Scott Fitzgerald's collection of short stories "Jazz Age Stories".  Personally that whole bohemian crowd he hung with makes hipsters seem palatable in comparison, but he sure was a hell of a writer.  Really enjoying a few of these stories, although they're not all winners.  I'll have to read "The Great Gatsby" soon for a 4th time before the movie comes out.

justahamandegger

 

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Just finished "The Devil's Eye" by Jack McDevitt. I like his stories, but the ends always seem anticlimactic. This was a good book, not a great one, but a good one.

I read "Mad Dogs, Midgets and Screw jobs ...." by Pat Laprade and Bertrand Hebert before McDevitt's. If you are a wrestling fan, this is a good book. It is alot like Johnson and Oliver's Hall of Fame Books.

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This year I started reading Terry Pratchett books, in order from a list my friend sent me. I finished the first one "Guards! Guards!" and now reading "Men At Arms".

justahamandegger

 

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I resently have read "The Last Mongul: Lew Wasserman, MCA, and the Hidden History of Hollywood" by Dennis McDougal. I had never heard of Lew Wasserman or Jules Stein before and it is incredible how much infuence they had during the 20th century. Specially over many of the Presidents. It also told what a little "tool" Ronald Regan was even back in the 50's. Lot of nice little stories from back in the past here.

I also have read Ed Francis book, "50th State Big Time Wrestling". Very disappointing. Not alot to this book. Nice pictures, but that is about it. Wait for it to go on sale before you pick this one up.

srossi

 

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Just finished reading a decent book that I book on my honeymoon based on a Jamaican true story/urban, "The White Witch of Rosehall".  Now reading Steven Tyler's autobiography.
 

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About halfway through Artie Lange's first book, "Too Fat To Fish." Good read if you're an Artie and Stern show fan as I am.

After that I have former WWF/E ref Jimmy Korderas' book "Three Count."

Then I got "The Lords Of Salem," by Rob Zombie and B.K.Evenson from the library tonight. The movie based on this book is coming out sometime this year I believe. Rob Zombie directed it...No surprise there.

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Justice League #9

katook



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I just finished up the final book in the GAME OF THRONES series by George WW Martin, waiting for the next one!!

Let's just say if you are a fan of the TV show and the "Red Wedding" shcoked you, you ain't seen nuthin' yet!!

Chrisstlouis

 

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JYD book

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After the gruesome stuff I'd been reading recently, I decided to read
something light. I picked up a book called RAGE bty Steve Gerlach.
He's an Aussie with a devoted following. I haven't finished the book yet, but
when I do, I'll try to find other Gerlach books.
A good read, it concerns a college student named Ben, a 22 year old
virgin who jerks off to old copies of Hustler & soft core films.
He steals books from the library but always returns them. His favorite is
a book entitled REVENGE, about a businessman who gets even with all those who
wronged him by killing them with an axe.
Ben can't get laid, no matter what he tries. All the women he asks out turn him
down. One agrees to a date then stands him up.
Ben soon starts renting hard core films & then snuff films.  He'd love to do to
the fucking sluts who turned him down what he sees in the snuff films.
He'll show those bitches, those lying cunts.
He makes a list of all the women who wronged him, writing bitch beside each name.
Ben will get even one day. He'll show the world. It's not his fault women don't
like him. Of course his parents are to blame, not Ben. It's never his fault.
Then one day Ben buys a gun.

That's as far as I've gotten . We all know how this is gonna turn out.
A 22 year old virgin who hates the world, loves snuff films, now has a gun.
Chances are he doesn't like Mondays.

srossi

 

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Just finished "Ty and The Babe - Baseball's Fiercest Rivals: A Surprising Friendship and the 1941 Has-Beens Golf Championship".  Highly recommended for anyone who likes reading about Dead Ball Era baseball.  It recaps the entire relationship between the two, from their time on the field when they hated each other spanning their first meeting as the pitcher Ruth faced Cobb to Cobb's final ML at-bat in a game against the Yankees, to their gradual admiration and respect for each other in retirement, to the 1941 2-out-of-3 charity golf match that they played against each other.  Fairly short, less than 300 pages, but meticulously researched and not filled with the same old stories and stereotypes about both.  Also fascinating to hear all the quotes from the old-time ballplayers, as well as Ruth and Cobb talking about DiMaggio and Williams during their legendary 1941 season, which came during the golf games.  Old-time golf fans will probably enjoy the stories about Bobby Jones and all those guys too.   

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Benlen wrote:
Justice League #9


How did that turn out? Are you going to pick up #10?


I just finished "Moscow Rules" by Daniel Silva. Not one of his better books, but I think it is meant more of a set up book for his next one.

HBF



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"The 1970's, How We Got Here" by David Frum.

srossi

 

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I'm reading "Did Jesus Exist? The Historical Argument for Jesus of Nazareth" by Bart Ehrman.  Just a few chapters in, don't know what to make of it yet.  Won't comment until the end. 

justahamandegger

 

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yellowdog wrote:
Just finished The Destroyer's book. I have to admit I was a little disappointed. Too much of life outside of the ring and not enough about his wrestling career and inside the ring for me. I think the author having little knowledge of pro wrestling didn't help.

Just finished this book. I am a little disappointed too. This comes off more of a man who wrestled, rather than about a wrestler. I like that he walks that fine line and doesn't say wrestling was real or a work.

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The Last Jedi by Michael Reaves& Maya Bohnhoff

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khawk wrote: There are some books that can be downloaded here for free:

http://www.bookos.org



I think the time for this site to have newer books available for free download is coming to a close. Many entries for recent books now show "Link taken down by rightful owner" or some such.

Eventually it will probably be left with public domain stuff a la archive.org or with links to books that people want to share.

So if you are looking for something in particular, do it soon.

khawk
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pjstef wrote:
khawk wrote: There are some books that can be downloaded here for free:

http://www.bookos.org



I think the time for this site to have newer books available for free download is coming to a close. Many entries for recent books now show "Link taken down by rightful owner" or some such.

Eventually it will probably be left with public domain stuff a la archive.org or with links to books that people want to share.

So if you are looking for something in particular, do it soon.


Los of stuff goes up for a day and then gets pulled, so checking often is a good thing.

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khawk wrote: pjstef wrote:
khawk wrote: There are some books that can be downloaded here for free:

http://www.bookos.org



I think the time for this site to have newer books available for free download is coming to a close. Many entries for recent books now show "Link taken down by rightful owner" or some such.

Eventually it will probably be left with public domain stuff a la archive.org or with links to books that people want to share.

So if you are looking for something in particular, do it soon.


Los of stuff goes up for a day and then gets pulled, so checking often is a good thing.
I found a ton of stuff there.

brodiescomics



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I just finished the 3rd TPB of The Walking Dead and started the 4th. Great stuff and so different from the TV show.

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Mick Foley, Countdown to Lockdown. Found at the dollar store.

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BlueThunder wrote:
srossi wrote: BlueThunder wrote: srossi wrote: BlueThunder wrote: sek69 wrote: BlueThunder wrote: mike3775 wrote: gwlee7 wrote: BlueThunder wrote: Suicide of a Superpower- Pat Buchanan
I bet that's an interesting book.  I don't care for Buchanan's views most of the time and am certainly glad his run for president failed but, I respect the passion.  He was great on the McLoughlin Group that was on PBS.
Buchanan is a great pundit that I will admit, but as a serious Presidential candidate, no way should he ever run

I'd give my right arm to have him president.

Of course you would.

Boy, it would truly suck to see American companies returning back home, an end of the tidal wave of illegals, no more needless wars, massive deportations, and a restoration of the 2nd Amendment.

Well at least a couple of those things would suck.

This should be good. Which ones.

Not everyone is as xenophobic as you and Pat.  Not to mention inaccurate, as there is hardly a "tidal wave" of illegals, especially since the economic crash.  Funny thing is, before the border war was intensified by yahoos, illegals used to come here for seasonal work that Americans didn't want to do, make some money, then go home until the next year.  The more we enforce the borders, the more we make them stay here.  One of the unintended consequences that happens whenever we try to enforce unjust laws.  That's just fact, check out illegal immigration demos from the past 75 years.  We went from moderate two-way flow to massive one-way flow, although lately no one really wants to come here anymore comparatively speaking.


Your argument has more holes than swiss cheese. I'll grant you that illegal crossing has dipped because of the recession. Gee, what's going to happen once we get back on track? Please explained to me how we have an estimated 20 million illegals since the 1986 Reagan amnesty? If your theory was correct, we would have a fraction of that if the worked and went home.

 

I see you buy into the "doing jobs Americans won't do" malarky. Just curious, who did these jobs before we had this epidemic of illegals? I'll save you the time. Legal immigrants, teenagers, and low IQ Americans typiclly did these menial jobs.


I'm by no means an expert on this topic, nor is it of particular interest to me, but I have to agree with the "doing jobs americans won't do" myth being crap. You mean, "doing jobs for wages that would be illegal for employers to pay American citizens over the table"

srossi

 

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I'm finally reading Sparky Lyle's "The Bronx Zoo" for the first time.  Just one of those books I always meant to read and never got around to.  Very entertaining.

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srossi wrote: I'm finally reading Sparky Lyle's "The Bronx Zoo" for the first time.  Just one of those books I always meant to read and never got around to.  Very entertaining.

Great, you will enjoy. I read it once, probably 30 years ago in high school, and there are quire a few stories in it that I can still remember clearly.

HBF



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pjstef wrote:
srossi wrote: I'm finally reading Sparky Lyle's "The Bronx Zoo" for the first time.  Just one of those books I always meant to read and never got around to.  Very entertaining.

Great, you will enjoy. I read it once, probably 30 years ago in high school, and there are quire a few stories in it that I can still remember clearly.


Me too.

lobo316



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HBF wrote:
pjstef wrote:
srossi wrote: I'm finally reading Sparky Lyle's "The Bronx Zoo" for the first time.  Just one of those books I always meant to read and never got around to.  Very entertaining.

Great, you will enjoy. I read it once, probably 30 years ago in high school, and there are quire a few stories in it that I can still remember clearly.


Me too.



Me three. A great baseball book from that era.

srossi

 

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lobo316 wrote: HBF wrote:
pjstef wrote:
srossi wrote: I'm finally reading Sparky Lyle's "The Bronx Zoo" for the first time.  Just one of those books I always meant to read and never got around to.  Very entertaining.

Great, you will enjoy. I read it once, probably 30 years ago in high school, and there are quire a few stories in it that I can still remember clearly.


Me too.


Me three. A great baseball book from that era.

Finished it and loved it.  Only took me 3 days to get through - quick, fun read.  Felt it was much more entertaining than "Ball Four" actually, and I had read that one many moons ago.  Still hard to believe after all these years that they turned Sparky Lyle into a glorified mop-up man right after he won the Cy Young. 

Last edited on Tue Sep 3rd, 2013 03:08 am by srossi

srossi

 

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Just finished Michael Palmer's "A Heartbeat Away", a political thriller about a deadly virus being released during the State of the Union address and the President and everyone else needing to be quarantined.  My mother-in-law gave it to me and now I know why I rarely read "best-sellers".  Just awful.  Very much like a Hollywood summer blockbuster that makes no sense if you think about it for more than 5 seconds.  Looking forward to finding some good non-fiction again soon.

Last edited on Fri Sep 13th, 2013 06:19 pm by srossi

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srossi wrote: I'm reading "Did Jesus Exist? The Historical Argument for Jesus of Nazareth" by Bart Ehrman.  Just a few chapters in, don't know what to make of it yet.  Won't comment until the end.
I'm curious, was it any good?

srossi

 

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carpetbeggar wrote: srossi wrote: I'm reading "Did Jesus Exist? The Historical Argument for Jesus of Nazareth" by Bart Ehrman.  Just a few chapters in, don't know what to make of it yet.  Won't comment until the end.
I'm curious, was it any good?


It was interesting.  Definitely made me look at things in a different way, especially as it relates to using the Bible itself as a historical document, which I had always discounted in the past.  He takes you through the early verified sources of different things, both religious and non-religious.  The writer is a bit of an arrogant prick, so that turned me off, and there's a lot of redundancy and some things that don't really hold water.  But it is a good introduction to legitimate theological research.  The writer is an agnostic, by the way, but scoffs at the very idea that people question whether there was a real historical Jesus who more or less did the things we hear about (preach, hang out with the sick, rabble-rouse, get crucified).  He's pretty brutal towards sceptics.

There are some other interesting tidbits in there as well that shed light on translations.  Things that couldn't possibly have been said by Jesus that he is quoted as saying in the Bible, because they only make sense in Greek (the language the New Testament was actually written in) and not Aramaic (the language Jesus spoke).  Like if a comedian makes a double-entendre joke in English, a translation makes no sense because it won't be a double-entendre in Spanish.  So he can easily cut through some of the bullshit conversations that clearly never happened except in the minds of the people who wrote it a frw decades after Jesus died.

Anyway, if you have any interest in the subject, just read it.  If you've already read other books about it though, they migh be better.  My feelings on this are fairly mixed.

srossi

 

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I finally read "I Was A Teenage Professional Wrestler" by Ted Lewin.  Nothing much to say about it.  It was a pamphlet that I finished during one lunch break.  Thought I had heard good things.

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I'm a little over two thirds through "Republic of Pirates" by Colin Woodard. It's the story of the golden age of piracy, which is really 1715-1725 (it's where most of our popular perceptions about them come from). Fascinating book and a real flavour of the time.

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Famous Mortimer wrote: I'm a little over two thirds through "Republic of Pirates" by Colin Woodard. It's the story of the golden age of piracy, which is really 1715-1725 (it's where most of our popular perceptions about them come from). Fascinating book and a real flavour of the time.
THat actually sounds interesting.  I'm adding it to my library queue.

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Hello,I'm Johnny Cash Comic Book...



Published in 1976 by Spire Christian Comics.Tells the story about how Johnny Cash was saved by Jesus Christ.Got a bunch of other comix from Spire Christian Comics including some Archie's.Reading about Archie trying to get Betty and Veronica to accept Jesus Christ into their lives is f'n hilarious!

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TonyDaLoccsta wrote: Reading about Archie trying to get Betty and Veronica to accept Jesus Christ into their lives is f'n hilarious!


I assume that "Jesus Christ" was Archie's nickname for his dick.

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Read "The Mephisto Club" by Tess Gerritsen. This is a Isles and Rizzoli story. It was a bad story. It didn't answer the question if the bad guy really was a Nephilim.

srossi

 

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Just finsihed MMA referee "Big" John McCarthy's autobiography.  The first part is pretty boring as he just talks about his time in the LAPD and sucks a lot of pig cock, gloats about police brutality, and defends the Rodney King beating.  It picks up a bit when he talks about the formation of the UFC.  I had no idea he was so instrumental from the very beginning.  Then it gets a little boring as he just recaps a lot of fights.  The behind-the-scenes stuff involving the initial planning stages and then the sale to Dana and the Fertittas are the most interesting parts, and it's a very long and detailed book.

Later today I'm going to start "In the Garden of Beasts" by Erik Larson, author of one of my favorite books of all-time "The Devil in the White City".  It has a lot to live up to. 

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srossi wrote: Later today I'm going to start "In the Garden of Beasts" by Erik Larson, author of one of my favorite books of all-time "The Devil in the White City".  It has a lot to live up to. 

If you read less you'd have more time to start threads on this board so it was less boring for us. :)

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I've had a copy of "Pain & Passion...the History of Stampede" on my Kindle for six months and haven't touched it. Just started reading it last night and was blown away at home good it is so far. Admittedly, I had become really burnt out on wrestling bios, especially reading the drug/pranks hijinx that seems to happen more than Jim Cornette's face got plunged into a birthday cake back in the day, but it's a good read.

I'm 2/3 of the way through the Hobbit. Have meant to read the Lord of the Rings Trilogy forever, so I thought I'd test the waters with the prequel Hobbit. Not sure if I'll do LOTR now. Hobbit is fine, but like the Potter books I've read so far (1 and 2), they just do draw me in.

The other book I've been working on for months is The Last Hero, Hank's Aaron's bio. Really nice history on Aaron, especially in regards to his years with the Milwaukee Braves and the segregation issues of the day. Good stuff with lots of 50s baseball nostalgia.

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Last edited on Sun Nov 3rd, 2013 12:41 am by Road Warrior Yajuta

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This is the "sequel" to A Time To Kill, featuring Jake Brigance and a whole host of other characters from Ford County, Mississippi.

Not really so much a sequal involving Carl lee Hailey and that trail as the novel takes place 7 years after the fact, but if anybody ever wondered whatever happened to Jake Brigance, Willie Traynor (from The last Juror), Lucien Wilbanks, Harry Rex Vonner and host of other characters this is a good read (as are all John Grisham books).

Really good entertaining read

Road Warrior Yajuta



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Been on a reading kick the last couple months.  Grab the Nook every time I take the dogs out.


Have a Nice Day: A Tale of Blood and Sweatsocks

Terry Funk More than Just Hardcore

National Wrestling Alliance: The Untold Story of the Monopoly that Strangled Pro Wrestling

The House of Hades the Heroes of Olympus book 4

Marvel Comics: The Untold Story

The entire X Wing Series:
Rogue Squadron
Wedge's Gamble
The Krytos Trap
The Bacta War
Wraith Squadron
Iron Fist
Solo Command
Isard's Revenge
Starfighters of Adumar
Mercy Kill

The Bounty Hunter Wars Trilogy:
The Mandalorian Armor
Slave Ship
Hard Merchandise

The Courtship of Princess Leia

Star Wars Scoundrels(Timothy Zahn)

The following are not Graphic novels but the conventional type:
Batman: Knightfall
Batman vs 3 Villains Of Doom
The Batman Murders
Batman: Captured By The Engines
Batman: To Stalk A Specter
JLA Batman: The Stone King
Wayne Of Gotham
Thor Meets Captain America
The Great Gold Steal(Captain America)
The Avengers Thunderbolts
X-Men: Codename Wolverine
Metahumans vs the Undead: A Superhero vs Zombie Anthology

Blazer
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Road Warrior Yajuta wrote:


The entire X Wing Series:
Rogue Squadron
Wedge's Gamble
The Krytos Trap
The Bacta War
Wraith Squadron
Iron Fist
Solo Command
Isard's Revenge
Starfighters of Adumar
Mercy Kill

The Bounty Hunter Wars Trilogy:
The Mandalorian Armor
Slave Ship
Hard Merchandise

The Courtship of Princess Leia

Star Wars Scoundrels(Timothy Zahn)




Wow, I think I read almost every novel in the original Bantam series of Star Wars between '92 and 2000...the Zahn Trilogy, the Kevin Anderson trilogy, the Black Fleet Crisis, Courtship of Leia, Darksaber, etc...but I never got to the X-Wing series. Let me know how those turn out. I seem to recall they are decent books, as they don't focus on the main characters.

Where did you get the digital copies? I'm renting a lot of stuff from the local library lately.

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The Bully Pulpit by Goodwin, and The Letters of Arthur Schlesinger.

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Reading "Gulliver's Travels".  I try to mix in a healthy dose of the classics to the rest of my reading list, but this is not one of the better ones.  Fairly boring with a lot of satire of contemporary English-Irish politics that no one cares about anymore, and I didn't realize that he was a religious nut who hated the scientists of the day like Sir Isaac Newton and satirizes them as well.  So fuck him.  There certainly is a lot more to it than just the children's story adaptation of him being tied up by tiny people, though.  

Last edited on Tue Nov 12th, 2013 12:58 am by srossi

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Trying to get through "Infinite Jest" now. I almost never NOT finish a book, but I doubt I'll make it through 1,000 pages of this nonsense. I can't stand books where part of the "art" is not writing proper English, like all that "Naked Lunch" and "Howl" shit that was popular in the '60s. Hipsters are the new beatniks, and their books suck. At least the beatniks passed out and stopped writing after 200 pages though.

I need to read something fun again, maybe that pirate book that was recommended earlier in this thread which is next up in my library queue.

Last edited on Thu Nov 14th, 2013 07:03 pm by srossi

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The Making of KISS.

srossi

 

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Finished Erik Larson's "Thunderstruck", which brilliantly weaves together the story of Guglielmo Marconi inventing the long distance radio with a murder mystery committed by Dr. Crippen of his wife, and how Marconigrams wound up leading to his arrest.  Just phenomenal writing again.  All of his books are amazing.

I've now started a book on the Culper Six, the spy ring led by George Washington to gain intelligence to take back NY during the Revolutionary War, but it's written by a Fox News guy and reads liker it's written by a Fox News guy.  Fortunately it's short.

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I read Larson's book about Marconi, the inventor of radio.  Slow.....
Now, I am reading Targets of Deception by Jeffrey Stephens.  He is sort of the heir apparent to Vince Flynn.   Just finished Winston's War written by Michael Dobbs.  Also recently read "1927".

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Blazer wrote: Road Warrior Yajuta wrote:


The entire X Wing Series:
Rogue Squadron
Wedge's Gamble
The Krytos Trap
The Bacta War
Wraith Squadron
Iron Fist
Solo Command
Isard's Revenge
Starfighters of Adumar
Mercy Kill

The Bounty Hunter Wars Trilogy:
The Mandalorian Armor
Slave Ship
Hard Merchandise

The Courtship of Princess Leia

Star Wars Scoundrels(Timothy Zahn)




Wow, I think I read almost every novel in the original Bantam series of Star Wars between '92 and 2000...the Zahn Trilogy, the Kevin Anderson trilogy, the Black Fleet Crisis, Courtship of Leia, Darksaber, etc...but I never got to the X-Wing series. Let me know how those turn out. I seem to recall they are decent books, as they don't focus on the main characters.

Where did you get the digital copies? I'm renting a lot of stuff from the local library lately.
I had gotten many here and there but also a ton from that bookos site that was shut down

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Road Warrior Yajuta wrote: I had gotten many here and there but also a ton from that bookos site that was shut down

It's not gone, just moved and slightly renamed:
http://bookza.org/
 
 

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Reading Penn Jillette's "Every Day is an Atheist Holiday".  He's really a great writer, can switch from absolutely hilarious to tear-jerkingly poignant in the same paragraph.  He's probably the most legitimately brilliant entertainer of this era, as in just flat-out smart.  I highly recommend any of his books even if you don't agree with all of his conclusions, as I don't.

Last edited on Sun Jan 5th, 2014 05:03 am by srossi

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Just finished "Floating City: A Rogue Sociologist Lost and Found in New York's Underground Economy" by Sudhir Venkatesh.  I'll just a paste a brief review I wrote.  Suffice it to say, I was disappointed but maybe others can find value in it where I didn't.

You would think that there would be a fascinating story to be told in discussing the underground economy of NYC and how the poor and rich are interrelated within it. And there must be. But this isn't that story. "Floating City" is the most boring book you'll ever read about sex and drugs. The main problem might be that Sudhir Venkatesh is a sociologist and simply not a very good writer. If you take out all the redundancies and the paragraphs that Sudhir rephrases again and again and again in only slightly different ways, you might be left with 100 pages that have a purpose out of the 300 in the book (who was his editor?). But the most maddening thing about "Floating City" is that no conclusions are ever drawn. He meets people, he interviews more than 150 of them (only a few of whom are actually followed in the book), he tries to come to conclusions, he tries to tie different worlds together, he asks lots of questions, and then...he rehashes all of this 100 pages later and 100 pages after that and never gets to a point. We learn almost nothing about the characters that Sudhir spends so much time following, except for relatively uninteresting anecdotes here and there that we pretty much could've figured out on our own (hookers sometimes get beat up by johns, drug dealers sometimes beat up people infringing on their territory, etc.). Did he need to spend almost 10 years of his life living in this world to learn that? Perhaps more disturbing than Sudhir's utter lack of writing skills is his questionable sociological skills! He seems to look down on, pity, and/or judge all of his subjects at various times, becomes way too personally involved, talks about his own marital problems with his subjects, arranges meetings between different people who likely wouldn't have met on their own, and basically taints in every conceivable way any data that he did get (so I guess it's good that he didn't really get much data). In short, Sudhir seems like a mess himself and even some of his subjects point this out to him. On top of all that, no one in this book is likeable. That's not a prerequisite for enjoying a book, but when it had nothing else going for it, it would've been nice to root for someone. But with the possible exception of drug dealer Shine, everyone (including/especially Sudhir himself) seems whiney and out of touch with reality. The rich, the poor, and the sociologist are all imminently pathetic. I didn't enjoy myself, I didn't learn anything or come to think about NYC (where I live) in a different way, and I didn't find any artistic, entertainment, or sociological merit to this book. So again, I'm left to ask, "What was the point?" I'll end with a quote from Shine himself in the final chapter, "I'm going to be honest with you. Since I've known you, you been meeting up with all these people, and you don't DO nothing with it." Exactly.

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Who do you write your reviews for?

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khawk wrote: Who do you write your reviews for?
That one was an Amazon review, but that was the first one I've ever written there.  I've done a few on my library's website.  I don't really write many book reviews though.

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"Jobs" by Walter Isaacson has been taking up space in my bookcase for ages now, and I finally started it today.  600 pages but a quick, easy, enjoyable read.  I'm already 100 pages in and I don't want to put it down.  Great book, great man.  The movie doesn't cover 1% of his story.

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Jim Hightowers There's Nothing in the Middle of the Road but Yellow Stripes and Dead Armadillos

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srossi wrote: Just finished "Floating City: A Rogue Sociologist Lost and Found in New York's Underground Economy" by Sudhir Venkatesh.  I'll just a paste a brief review I wrote.  Suffice it to say, I was disappointed but maybe others can find value in it where I didn't.

You would think that there would be a fascinating story to be told in discussing the underground economy of NYC and how the poor and rich are interrelated within it. And there must be. But this isn't that story. "Floating City" is the most boring book you'll ever read about sex and drugs. The main problem might be that Sudhir Venkatesh is a sociologist and simply not a very good writer. If you take out all the redundancies and the paragraphs that Sudhir rephrases again and again and again in only slightly different ways, you might be left with 100 pages that have a purpose out of the 300 in the book (who was his editor?). But the most maddening thing about "Floating City" is that no conclusions are ever drawn. He meets people, he interviews more than 150 of them (only a few of whom are actually followed in the book), he tries to come to conclusions, he tries to tie different worlds together, he asks lots of questions, and then...he rehashes all of this 100 pages later and 100 pages after that and never gets to a point. We learn almost nothing about the characters that Sudhir spends so much time following, except for relatively uninteresting anecdotes here and there that we pretty much could've figured out on our own (hookers sometimes get beat up by johns, drug dealers sometimes beat up people infringing on their territory, etc.). Did he need to spend almost 10 years of his life living in this world to learn that? Perhaps more disturbing than Sudhir's utter lack of writing skills is his questionable sociological skills! He seems to look down on, pity, and/or judge all of his subjects at various times, becomes way too personally involved, talks about his own marital problems with his subjects, arranges meetings between different people who likely wouldn't have met on their own, and basically taints in every conceivable way any data that he did get (so I guess it's good that he didn't really get much data). In short, Sudhir seems like a mess himself and even some of his subjects point this out to him. On top of all that, no one in this book is likeable. That's not a prerequisite for enjoying a book, but when it had nothing else going for it, it would've been nice to root for someone. But with the possible exception of drug dealer Shine, everyone (including/especially Sudhir himself) seems whiney and out of touch with reality. The rich, the poor, and the sociologist are all imminently pathetic. I didn't enjoy myself, I didn't learn anything or come to think about NYC (where I live) in a different way, and I didn't find any artistic, entertainment, or sociological merit to this book. So again, I'm left to ask, "What was the point?" I'll end with a quote from Shine himself in the final chapter, "I'm going to be honest with you. Since I've known you, you been meeting up with all these people, and you don't DO nothing with it." Exactly.Good review but can I suggest paragraphs?  My ADD makes it hard for me to read that.

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Ultimate Hockey
Total Hockey
Total NHL

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Just picked up picking stocks for dummies

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Reading "The Longest Fight", about Joe Gans, the first black boxing champion of any kind, and Mark Twain's classic "The Innocents Abroad".

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I just finished "The Disaster Artist", Greg Sestero's book about the making of "The Room" and his friendship with Tommy Wiseau. It's hilarious, and if you've ever seen the film I'd definitely recommend giving it a go.

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Reading "I Ain't No Pig Farmer" Dean Silverstone's history of the Seattle territory. Co-written by Scott Teal. Really enjoying it.

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Yea, I have been reading a lot of stuff like that.  Have read books in the last 3 months by John Bogle, Warren Buffett, a very old one by Benjamin Graham, Jim Cramer and about 6 others.  Have come to the conclusion that I should keep a healthy amounts in stock and bond index funds and go the opposite direction of everyone else with picks that hopefully will outperform.  Just bought KO.  Bought NLY in December near it's low.   Again, sticking mostly with low cost index funds though.  Have lightened up overall stock exposure because the PE ratio is higher than it's historical norm.

I have learned all of this from books over the last year.  Wish I had cared about this stuff 20 years ago.

I was responding to Blue Thunder


 

Last edited on Wed Mar 26th, 2014 06:38 am by Ultimark

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I'm reading Henry Bushkin's Johnny Carson Bio right now. Very enjoyable so far.

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"The Beatles-In Their Own Write"-the stories behind every song.

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Finally reading "The Dirt" by Motley Crue after all these years.

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srossi wrote: Finally reading "The Dirt" by Motley Crue after all these years.
I started it but they all come off so unlikeable to me I put it down and have no urge to pick it back up.

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khawk wrote: srossi wrote: Finally reading "The Dirt" by Motley Crue after all these years.
I started it but they all come off so unlikeable to me I put it down and have no urge to pick it back up.

Oh they're absolutely horrible people, even for rock stars (except for Mick, he doesn't seem that bad), but I can't put the book down.  Too many crazy stories.  For likeability, Nikki's "Heroin Diaries" makes him come across a lot better.

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srossi wrote: khawk wrote: srossi wrote: Finally reading "The Dirt" by Motley Crue after all these years.
I started it but they all come off so unlikeable to me I put it down and have no urge to pick it back up.

Oh they're absolutely horrible people, even for rock stars (except for Mick, he doesn't seem that bad), but I can't put the book down.  Too many crazy stories.  For likeability, Nikki's "Heroin Diaries" makes him come across a lot better.

John Corabi is actually the most likable guy in the book.  Man, do I feel sorry for him having to deal with that shitshow. 

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 Books that I have read since my last post.

 "Augie's Secrets: the Minneapolis mob and the king of the Hennepin strip" by Neal Karlen.   This book was more about the Jewish mob in Minneapolis during the 30's, 40's and 50's, than about Augie Ratner. As far as secrets? There were none.

 "Secret Partners: Big Tom Brown and the Barker Gang " by Tim Mahoney.  Nice book. Gave really good details.

 "Six Days of War" by Michael Oren. Good book. Really kept you up on what was going on behind the scenes.

 "The Yom Kippur War" by Abraham Rabinovich. This book dealt more with the fighting and didn't really mention much about what was going on behind the scenes till the last couple of chapters.

 "Great Martial Arts Movies: From Bruce Lee to Jackie Chan" by Richard Meyers. I liked this book.

 Graphic novel "The Immortal Iron Fist: The Seven Capital Cities of Heaven". If they ever make an Iron Fist movie, this is the story they should do.

 "Texas Longhorns Football History: A to Z"  By Richard Pennington. I was hoping for a lot more form this book. It only skims through the rich Longhorn history.

 

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Reading "Heads in Beds: A Reckless Memoir of Hotels, Hustles, and So-Called Hospitality" by Jacob Tomsky.  Funny and occasionally frightening look at the hospitality business that will make you wonder if you ever want to stay in a hotel again.  Also some good tips though about how to get what you want, and the things that you can and can't fight.

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Just started Mariano Rivera's autobiography "The Closer".

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As I've seen a load of adaptations but never the source, "The Three Musketeers". It's a brilliant book, and thanks to a brand new translation (by Richard Pevear, if you want to track it down) it reads like a modern adventure story. Definitely worth it, as are all Pevear's translations of Dumas.

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I finished The Three Musketeers, and really enjoyed it. It's such a great adventure story, and while of the two Dumas books I've read so far, I preferred "The Count Of Monte Cristo", this one is pretty brilliant too.

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Metamorpho 1-5

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Reading Roger Ebert's autobiography "Life Itself".  I feel like the book was written more for himself as he was dying than an audience.  It's hampered by minutiae, long and not very substantive stories about people we don't know or care about, but he's such a good writer that even some of those are interesting.  The whole book smells like death thoughout, a chronicle of the passage of time and a long march towards the inevitable conclusion that we all know Ebert was heading towards.  It's pretty sad, even the parts that aren't meant to be.  But he lived a hell of a life.

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Just finished a hilarious book called "The Knitting Circle Rapist Annihilation Squad". It's a bunch of jokes and a strongly left-wing political tract masquerading as a novel, so I'd caution against reading it if that doesn't sound like fun to you. But if you do read it, you'll love it I reckon.

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Famous Mortimer wrote: Just finished a hilarious book called "The Knitting Circle Rapist Annihilation Squad". It's a bunch of jokes and a strongly left-wing political tract masquerading as a novel, so I'd caution against reading it if that doesn't sound like fun to you. But if you do read it, you'll love it I reckon.

Sounds like torture.

I just started "What a Wonderful Life: The Magic of Louis Armstrong's Later Years" by Ricky Riccardi.  Fascinating book about Armstrong's brilliance at a time when he was being publicly derided for becoming a lazy musician and an Uncle Tom.  Gives quite the counter-argument to both.  Really strong read whether you like jazz or not.  Last month I visited his house in Corona, Queens and it really got me interested in him.

Also slowly getting through a book of LBJ's secret tape-recorded conversations, much of which (at least thus far) focuses on how he tried to use Jackie Kennedy to gain acceptance as president, and how she was completely aware of this and tried to stay at arm's length so as not to endorse or renounce him.  He also blatantly hits on her less than 3 days after JFK was assassinated (but then, he hit on her every time they talked, before and after JFK's death). 

Last edited on Tue Jun 24th, 2014 09:09 pm by srossi

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Reading F. Scott Fitzgerald's first novel, "This Side of Paradise".  Not "The Great Gatsby" by any stretch, but I've had a 1941 edition on my bookcase for years now and I figured I should probably read it at some point.  Enjoyable for what it is.

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DC Showcase Presents World's Finest Volume 1

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khawk wrote: Road Warrior Yajuta wrote: I had gotten many here and there but also a ton from that bookos site that was shut down

It's not gone, just moved and slightly renamed:
http://bookza.org/
 
 
http://bookzz.org/

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I am currently reading "Doctor Sleep" from Stephen King. It is the sequel to "The Shining" it has been very good thus far.

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Reading George Steinbrenner's biography by Bill Madden of The Daily News.  I shy away from sports book written by nearly illiterate newspaper writers, so I put this one off for a really long time, but Madden impresses here.  This is actually a great read and brings back all the infuriating shit that Steinbrenner did before he re-invented his legacy late in life.  Even if you lived through it the fist time, you'll still learn a lot of new and interesting tidbits.  Madden got access to hours of Gabe Paul's private tapes from his widow, and there's some gems in there.  

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Just finished every Jack Reacher novel from Lee Child in order, a great summer read, next one should be out this month too

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Just finished up Batman Volume 1: The Court of Owls which is the first 7 issues of the New 52 Batman. I really enjoyed it and will start Volume 2: The City of Owls, tonight.

http://www.amazon.com/Batman-Vol-The-Court-Owls/dp/1401235425

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I fucking detest all that is the New 52.

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I'm not into new comics, but I picked up Batman Death of the family, from the library, which was part of this new 52 stuff. The ending stunk, but the rest was very good.

Currently reading (very slowly) Randy Bachman's Vinyl Tap Stories, which are stories he has told on his radio show (didnt know he had a show). But they are great stories, like how he titled "No Sugar Tonight".

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Reading "Pinkerton's Great Detective: The Amazing Life and Times of James McParland" by Beau Riffenburgh. 

Very interesting biography about early undercover detective work as McParland infiltrates the Irish immigrant gang the Molly Maguires on behalf of the Reading Railroad in the years following the Civil War.  Also a good look at labor relations as most of the Molly Maguires were disgruntled miner union workers who had their foremen, and anyone else they didn't like, killed.

 

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The new Don Fargo bio. So far it's great. Given his rich and entertaining career, I suspect the entire book will be great

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Just finished "The Book Thief" by Marcus Zusak.  Phenomenal and depressing book about Nazi Germany, more from the typical poor Germans' point of view than most.  It's a movie now and I guess I'll watch it, but I know it won't be as good.

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I just started reading Sycamore Row by John Grisham. It's the long awaited sequel to A Time To Kill.

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Marvel 1602-Very well done. Not your typical comic book fare.

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clawmaster wrote: I just started reading Sycamore Row by John Grisham. It's the long awaited sequel to A Time To Kill.

Best thriller I've read in a while. Excellent unexpected ending. The best for all parties involved.

The following characters return. I'm listing them in order of importance to this book and am using the actors that players the characters on screen for those that never read the first book.

Matthew McConaughey as Jake Brigance
Donald Sutherland as Lucien Wilbanks
Ashley Judd as Carla Brigance
Oliver Platt as Henry Rex Vonner
Charles S. Dutton as Ozzie Walls
Kevin Spacey as Rufus Buckley

Jake is the star along with a black maid. Of the remaining characters from the first book, the Lucien Wilbanks character plays a vital role. Carla Brigance, Henry Rex Vonner and Ozzie Walls are virtually interchangeable in terms of importance to the book. Rufus Buckley is there for the first half of the book then is promptly kicked to the curb.

I don't want to give too much away about this book. The only bad thing about the book is it is a bit wordy. But it's a John Grisham novel. What do you expect?

Not sure this book will make it to the silver screen. They definitely would need MM to play Jake Brigance and Donald Sutherland to play Lucien. The other characters could be played by different people. They'd need a very good middle aged black actress to play the maid.


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I'm finally reading Bob Holly's book.  It's a surprisingly good read and Holly comes across as really down-to-earth and likeable and a guy who just out his head down and did his job.  Everyone should come across good in their own books, but most actually don't. 

A few interesting pay-off related tidbits.  He made $20,000 for the 3-way match with Gunn and Snow at WM XV, by far his biggest single pay-off ever.  The following WM in 2000 he made $9,000, his second biggest payoff.  He claims 2000 was the only year he received more than his downside guarantee, making almost double his minimum. 

He clears up a lot of things about the Tough Enough incident with Matt Cappotelli and the broken neck he suffered at the hands of Lesnar, which he insists was just an accident and he laughs at the people who claimed he sandbagged him on the move when he got hurt, and I believe him. 

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About halfway through "One Summer: America, 1927" by Bill Bryson.  About exactly what it sounds like.  Charles Lindbergh, Al Capone, Calvin Coolidge, Herbert Hoover, Babe Ruth, Henry Ford, the first "murder of the century" with Ruth Snyder, Jack Dempsey vs. Gene Tunney, Sacco and Vanzetti, the seeds of the Great Depression being sown.  Amazing cast of characters, all beautifully intertwined into a compelling narrative.  Phenomenal book, highly recommended. 

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The Blood of Olympus

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Starting to get into classic literature again after a spate of non-fiction.  Just finished "Journey to the Center of the Earth" by Jules Verne, which was really only average at best.  But now I'm reading "The Gilded Age" by Mark Twain, a really hilarious and brilliant look at greed, politics, and corruption in the late 1800s (or now, for that matter).  I know so many Escol Sellers' that it isn't even funny.

katook



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Just Finished reading Gray Mountain by John Grisham, Grisham is one of my favorite authors, this one is about a female attorney from Wall Street who loses her job and ends up in Appalachia coal country where she ends up working for a free law clinic for poor people and takes up the fight against big coal mining companies and their practices, a pretty darn good read as are all of Grishams books.

Yesterday, I received in the mail a copy of the book "Life aboard a Laker from 1964 to 1999" by Capt. Richard D Metz (retired), in which the good Captain talks about his career sailing the Great Lakes, which is totally fascinating to me as I grew up in a town where they built the big Lakers and they came in and out of the harbor 2-3 times a day loaded with taconite and coal for the Steel Mill.

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Read Chris Jericho's 3rd book, which is good but there clearly wasn't as much for him to say as in the first 2 books.  He mostly covers the Shawn Michaels and Rey Misterio feuds and his outside projects involving Fozzy, Dancing With The Stars, and the game show Downfall. 

Now I'm almost done with "Destiny of the Republic" about James Garfield and his assassination.  Brilliantly written book, so interesting and sad to see how he held on for 2 1/2 months as the nation waited to see if he'd survive and how his doctors did everything wrong because his old guard didn't believe in antiseptic treatment that was already in use in Europe.  Lots of great stuff on his delusional assassin Charles Guiteau and Alexander Graham Bell's efforts to invent a device to locate the bullet.  Really fantastic read about the guy who by most accounts was the nicest guy to ever be President and never got to do anything in office before being killed by a madman.

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Reading "Flapper: A Madcap Story of Sex, Style, Celebrity, and the Women Who Made America Modern" by Joshua Zeitz.  I love reading about the '20s, and the seismic shift in mores between 1900 and 1920.  This book gets bogged down a bit in the minutiae of the fashion houses of Coco Chanel, et al and I'm really not all that interested in going into that much detail with that aspect.  But it's a very interesting read and there's tons of stuff on F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald of course.    

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I've just started Jeff Guinn's "Manson". It's one of those books you can't put down.
It's no wonder Manson turned out the way he did. He had one fucked up childhood.
Guinn has also written books on the shootout at the OK corral & Bonny & Clyde.
Looks like I'll be reading them as well.

 



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Robert Reich's "Reason"

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brodiescomics wrote: Just finished up Batman Volume 1: The Court of Owls which is the first 7 issues of the New 52 Batman. I really enjoyed it and will start Volume 2: The City of Owls, tonight.

http://www.amazon.com/Batman-Vol-The-Court-Owls/dp/1401235425
I absolutely loathe the new 52 and am shocked Marvel will be ripping it off after Secret War. 

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Star Wars Crucible

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Andrew Dice Clay's autobiography is a light and entertaining read and I'm on the last few chapters.

I'm also reading the 700 page "Madison and Jefferson" by Andrew Burstein, which is the definitive volume on the relationship between our 3rd and 4th Presidents.

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Just finished

Mafia Prince: Inside America's Most Violent Crime Family and the Bloody Fall of La Cosa Nostra

and will be starting

Havana Nocturne: How the Mob Owned Cuba and Then Lost It to the Revolution

in the next few days
 

Last edited on Thu May 7th, 2015 06:09 am by Franchise

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 Some of the books that I have read in the last couple of months.

 

Firebird by Jack McDevitt. I always like the way his mysteries start off in one direction and then go off in another total different direction.

The Golem and The Jinni by Helene Wecker. This one was really done well. I thought it pretty original.

 Wrestling With The Past by Paul "The Butcher" Vachon. I didn't realize this was the third book of three. This one was alright, but I think I would have liked the first two books better. This gave a little insight into what Verne Gagne was like.

Even This I Get to Experience by Norman Lear. This one was o.k.. I did like his thoughts on Jerry Lewis and Dean Martin and on working with Carol O'Connor. The more you read the book, the more you realized how much Lear was in love with himself.

I Did It My Way by Bud Grant. After reading this one, I see Bud Grant completely different. I would have like to have heard more team stories.

 

Last edited on Thu Jun 18th, 2015 07:16 pm by justahamandegger

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Almost finished with "Dead Wake" about the sinking of the Luisitania.  Wow, what an amazing read.  Written by my favorite author Erik Larson, who also wrote "The Devil in the White City", "In the Garden of Beasts" and "Thunderstruck", each one a masterpiece, so I'm not surprised at how good this one is.  All of his books are must reads.

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Buzz- A Year of Paying Attention.

This is a must read book for any parent whose kid has been diagnosed with ADD/ADHD like my youngest one.

Once I'm done with the above book, I have Adios America by Ann Coulter.

Last edited on Fri Jul 24th, 2015 06:02 am by BlueThunder

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Just read Stephen Davis' unauthorized biography of Guns N' Roses and it was by far the best written and researched that I've come across. Phenomenal rock 'n' roll book.

Now I'm re-reading Heinlein's classic "The Moon is a Harsh Mistress" and damn if it isn't even better than I remember it. Heinlein might be my favorite author ever.

Last edited on Fri Aug 7th, 2015 08:25 pm by srossi

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The Five Families - By Selwyn Raab

HBF



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Ordered this off Amazon-"Thin Ice-A Season in Hell with the New York Rangers" by Larry "Ratso" Sloman. 

I'm about 2/3 done with it and it's a great read.  It's the 1979-80 hockey season and Ratso pals around with Greschner, Beck, Murdoch, Espo and the Swedes while they chase tail,  drink copious amounts and try to understand the weirdness of Freddie Shero while trying to get back to the Stanley Cup Finals.  Highly recommended.

Last edited on Mon Sep 7th, 2015 06:17 am by HBF

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Batman Year One
Judge Dredd The Complete Case Files 23
Judge Dredd City of Courts
Invincible Family Matters
X Men The Asgardian Wars
The Amazing Spiderman The Complete Alien Suit Saga Vol.1
Wolverine and the X Men The Death of Wolverine

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Just read "the rogue lawyer" by John Grisham, as are all Grisham novels it was quite entertaining and a fun read.

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TMNT Classics Volume 2
The Death of Wolverine
Gordon of Gotham

Blazer
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I'm completely out of the comics loop and have been just about since the New 52 happened...probably even a few years before that, sat 2004/2005. Did I see a rumor recently that Gordon is now Batman?

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Blazer wrote: I'm completely out of the comics loop and have been just about since the New 52 happened...probably even a few years before that, sat 2004/2005. Did I see a rumor recently that Gordon is now Batman?I know he donned a retarded suit of armor to become Batman when Bruce "died".(The suit looked dumb as hell, at least in the 90s the Azrael Batman's suit looked decent this suit looked like a suit made for Captain Carrot)  I don't know the particulars or of he still is because I loathe what DC and Marvel put out today.  I only read the Gordon of Gotham because it was given to me.  I really tried to give these new comics a chance but they suck. 

Last edited on Mon Dec 7th, 2015 08:24 pm by Road Warrior Yajuta

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Road Warrior Yajuta wrote: Blazer wrote: I'm completely out of the comics loop and have been just about since the New 52 happened...probably even a few years before that, sat 2004/2005. Did I see a rumor recently that Gordon is now Batman?I know he donned a retarded suit of armor to become Batman when Bruce "died".(The suit looked dumb as hell, at least in the 90s the Azrael Batman's suit looked decent this suit looked like a suit made for Captain Carrot)  I don't know the particulars or of he still is because I loathe what DC and Marvel put out today.  I only read the Gordon of Gotham because it was given to me.  I really tried to give these new comics a chance but they suck. 
Robo-Batman and on the cover of Batman he looks like a fucking fairy.  And isn't Gordon supposed to be a hundred years old?  I haven't read batman in a long while so don't know where they rebooted it and forgot all about continuity(sort of like WWE) but in the last Batman's I did read Gordon looked as old as the hills.  And of course Bruce Wayne isn't dead, he's more likely to come out of the closet than die.

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Angelic Assassin wrote: Road Warrior Yajuta wrote: Blazer wrote: I'm completely out of the comics loop and have been just about since the New 52 happened...probably even a few years before that, sat 2004/2005. Did I see a rumor recently that Gordon is now Batman?I know he donned a retarded suit of armor to become Batman when Bruce "died".(The suit looked dumb as hell, at least in the 90s the Azrael Batman's suit looked decent this suit looked like a suit made for Captain Carrot)  I don't know the particulars or of he still is because I loathe what DC and Marvel put out today.  I only read the Gordon of Gotham because it was given to me.  I really tried to give these new comics a chance but they suck. 
Robo-Batman and on the cover of Batman he looks like a fucking fairy.  And isn't Gordon supposed to be a hundred years old?  I haven't read batman in a long while so don't know where they rebooted it and forgot all about continuity(sort of like WWE) but in the last Batman's I did read Gordon looked as old as the hills.  And of course Bruce Wayne isn't dead, he's more likely to come out of the closet than die.
In the new continuity Gordon is older, but could still throw down and kick ass if he needs to. 

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Michael Connolly-The Burning Room


A Harry Bosch novel, one of my favorite series and while this one was fine it didn't seem to have the oomph of previous entries into the canon.  Seemed more formulaic than I remember Connolly being and maybe he's just running out of ideas.

Fantasy Life-Matthew Berry


For the fantasy sports crowd a light quick read despite being near 400 pages but with some real funny stories of the things that go on in fantasy leagues on a regular basis.  Bargain bin book Ivana picked up for me for 7.99 as she knew I didn't have it and would get a kick out of it.  All she knows from sports is Tom Brady.   A book that win some non game days coming up in all sports you could blow through in an afternoon.


Odd Apocalypse-Dean Koontz


Actually rereading all the Dean Koontz Odd Thomas Books as the last one just came out in paperback.  I'm weird that way and just wanted to refressh my memory on everything.


Charles Dickens-The Pickwick Papers


On a bedside night table crammed with reading material I always have a "classic" on the go and this is one I hadn't yet read.   It's Dickens and not sure many here would read it, it just so happens its one of the books in the group I'm reading.


Next up will be me going into the library(the home one) where my dear departed Debra said  there were more books than I'd be able to read if I lived to be 200 years old.  She's probably right but I'm going to give it the old college try, reading normally and not speed reading.

Already selected for reading are;


Bloody Sunday's-Mike Freeman-Inside the dazzling rough and tumble world of the NFL.  From about a decade ago but a recent bargain bin selection, 3 for $10 variety.


Tales To Astonish-Ronin Ro


 For comic book fans  and the history of comic books and Jack Kirby and Stan Lee particularly.  Not really buying comic books anymore but have a few of these types of books kicking around that I've kept putting off reading.

The League-The rise and Decline of the NFL-David Harris

I've read before a long time ago and for some reason feel like reading it again.


And finally(for now) a 50 cent bargain bin find that at just over 230 pages i'm finally going to sit and read cover to cover no matter how bad it might be

Bucket Nut-Liza Cody

She's Big, She's Ugly, She's Bad!  She's simply "Bucket Nut".  Some kind of a crime novel and Eva not exactly sure if she is actually the protagonist or not but she has ambitions on being the Women's Heavyweight Wrestling Champion of Great Britain.  How horrible could it be? 

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Oh and I need to find a way to read the Gary Hart book online.  Don't feel like printing it but I can only sit at a computer and read for so long.  Old school in that I like to hold what I'm reading in my hands.  No tablet, e-reader, whatever, etc.

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Angelic Assassin wrote: Oh and I need to find a way to read the Gary Hart book online.  Don't feel like printing it but I can only sit at a computer and read for so long.  Old school in that I like to hold what I'm reading in my hands.  No tablet, e-reader, whatever, etc.
I also have been reading this on my computer and just love it.   But, I can only sit for so long, I am into about page 40-50 out of it.

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e-reader is the best way to go if your having issues like that. With the proper case it feels just like a book and it's easier to hold as well.

I love mine, I just wish I could find some time to read it more!

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Just finished the Gary Hart book- "My Life In Wrestling" and it was excellent. I highly recommend it for any old school fan like myself!

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I finally started "City on Fire", the smash-hit 1,000+ page novel of 2015 by first-time published author Garth Risk Hallberg. And through 50 pages, it's as good as advertised and I don't want to put it down.



http://garthriskhallberg.com/

New York City, 1976. Meet Regan and William Hamilton-Sweeney, estranged heirs to one of the city’s great fortunes; Keith and Mercer, the men who, for better or worse, love them; Charlie and Samantha, two suburban teenagers seduced by downtown’s punk scene; an obsessive magazine reporter and his idealistic neighbor—and the detective trying to figure out what any of them have to do with a shooting in Central Park on New Year’s Eve.

The mystery, as it reverberates through families, friendships, and the corridors of power, will open up even the loneliest-seeming corners of the crowded city. And when the blackout of July 13, 1977, plunges this world into darkness, each of these lives will be changed forever.

City on Fire is an unforgettable novel about love and betrayal and forgiveness, about art and truth and rock ’n’ roll: about what people need from each other in order to live…and about what makes the living worth doing in the first place.

Last edited on Thu Jan 14th, 2016 01:44 am by srossi

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"A Patriot's History of the United States: From Columbus's Great Discovery to the War on Terror" by Larry Schweikart and Michael Allen

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Just took out "Ford County" by John Grisham.  Not sure if I've read it or not, as I've sort of lost track with the Grisham books.

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I have been reading Peter Guralnick's two-part Elvis Presley biography LAST TRAIN FROM MEMPHIS and CARELESS LOVE
can't put it (them) down
it's funny how some authors can write biographies that are dull as dirt and others tell the same story but it just leaps off the page - there have been many Elvis biographies, obviously, but Guralnicks two-part 1000 pager is widely considered heads above the others and I can see why

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 Some books I have read lately.

 The English Spy by Daniel Silva  -  Still my favorite character. The Israel super spy and his new friend deal with the IRA.

 Bob Backlund's book

 Matt Lands by Jim Brunzell  -  Very short book. Only a handful of good stories. Could have and should have been better.

 Hindenburg: Icon of German Militarism  -  Never excepted blame for anything, even though it was mostly his fault and then still came out the German hero.

 

 

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Finished "Killing Patton" by Bill O'Reilly. Really interesting stuff in there about his death, including that it likely was a CIA-led assasination in order to keep us out of potential WW3. 

Patton and Truman were two guys that didn't trust the Russians. FDR, like a dope, thought Stalin was a great guy. Patton knew that the Reds were going to be the bigger issue and had major issues with Eisenhower and Ike's faulty strategies, which he was proven correct on. 

Highly recommended read.

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I think I'll read that.

But for now I think I'm gonna write a book. Call it "Stuck between a rock and a hard spot - A Gen Xers Managers guide to surviving Asshole Baby Boomers that think we owe them the right to retire on the job and suck-ass Millennial that just think we owe them"

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Quattro wrote: I think I'll read that.

But for now I think I'm gonna write a book. Call it "Stuck between a rock and a hard spot - A Gen Xers Managers guide to surviving Asshole Baby Boomers that think we owe them the right to retire on the job and suck-ass Millennial that just think we owe them"
I feel for you.  I remember interviewing sales reps in 2000 when the bull market was out of fucking control. These kids were straight out of school and saying "I'd like an $80K salary" and my first thought was "next". It's gotten worse with the fucking wusses of today.

katook



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The "Will Robie" series of novels by David Baldacci, currently on Book 3 :The Target".
Recently finished the "Camel Club" series by the same author, In really enjoy Baldacci's novels.

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Just started the "Death of the Family" storyline that ran through the Batman Comics in 2012. So far, so good. Love a good Joker story.

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Just finished "Mad Dogs, Midgets and Screw Jobs" I read lots of praise for it, but I found it a bit dry.

Moving on to the new Inoki vs. Ali book

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Just got hold of the Grappler's book. Will go through that over the next week.

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"United States of Jihad" by Peter Bergen.

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The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown. I didn't care for it as much as Deception Point or Digital Fortress. Decent book, though.

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Just finishing Bill Pennington's 500 page biography on Billy Martin.  Wow, amazing and comprehensive book.  Highly recommended for any baseball fan.

As soon as I finish the last chapter, I'm going to start "Thomas Jefferson Dreams of Sally Hemings" by Stephen O'Connor, a fictionalized account of their relationship in novel form that has been getting rave reviews. 

Last edited on Tue Aug 16th, 2016 11:31 pm by srossi

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Vince Flynn (who's dead so his books are now written by Kyle Mills) "Order to Kill". I think this is the 14th "Mitch Rapp" book. He is a bad ass who works for the CIA. All the books are a good read. Nothing world changing.

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Just finished a book about Teddy Roosevelt's expedition where he discovered The River of Doubt in The Amazon and nearly died. Amazing book, amazing story. Can you imagine any president today doing something like that after he was out of office?  He literally put 1,000 miles of river on the map. And when he got sick he wanted to commit suicide in the jungle so he wouldn't slow down the rest of the expedition, and the only thing that stopped him was the team insisting that they would try to carry his body out for a proper burial and that would slow them down even more.

Last edited on Tue Nov 15th, 2016 11:34 pm by srossi

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srossi wrote: Just finished a book about Teddy Roosevelt's expedition where he discovered The River of Doubt in The Amazon and nearly died. Amazing book, amazing story. Can you imagine any president today doing something like that after he was out of office?  He literally put 1,000 miles of river on the map. And when he got sick he wanted to commit suicide in the jungle so he wouldn't slow down the rest of the expedition, and the only thing that stopped him was the team insisting that they would try to carry his body out for a proper burial and that would slow them down even more.
Saw a special on that.  I think it was the Smithsonian channel.  TR was never the same after that trip.  That guy was something else. 

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When it was Big Time. Written by one of our members Rockrims. (I think he is a member here). Story of Wrestling in California, North and South.

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srossi wrote: Just finished a book about Teddy Roosevelt's expedition where he discovered The River of Doubt in The Amazon and nearly died. Amazing book, amazing story. Can you imagine any president today doing something like that after he was out of office?  He literally put 1,000 miles of river on the map. And when he got sick he wanted to commit suicide in the jungle so he wouldn't slow down the rest of the expedition, and the only thing that stopped him was the team insisting that they would try to carry his body out for a proper burial and that would slow them down even more.
In October I read Colonel Roosevelt, which dealt solely with his post-President life.  I don't know what I enjoyed reading about more, the Africa and South America expeditions or the backroom politicking of the 1912 election.  I wish Wilson had given Roosevelt the green light to form his own brigade during WWI.  In planning it, Roosevelt basically viewed it as a chance to die on the battlefield.  But something tells me he probably wouldn't have got his wish, his survival instinct was that strong.   

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KGB wrote: srossi wrote: Just finished a book about Teddy Roosevelt's expedition where he discovered The River of Doubt in The Amazon and nearly died. Amazing book, amazing story. Can you imagine any president today doing something like that after he was out of office?  He literally put 1,000 miles of river on the map. And when he got sick he wanted to commit suicide in the jungle so he wouldn't slow down the rest of the expedition, and the only thing that stopped him was the team insisting that they would try to carry his body out for a proper burial and that would slow them down even more.
In October I read Colonel Roosevelt, which dealt solely with his post-President life.  I don't know what I enjoyed reading about more, the Africa and South America expeditions or the backroom politicking of the 1912 election.  I wish Wilson had given Roosevelt the green light to form his own brigade during WWI.  In planning it, Roosevelt basically viewed it as a chance to die on the battlefield.  But something tells me he probably wouldn't have got his wish, his survival instinct was that strong.   

From what I heard, the main reason Wilson didn't let Teddy go to war was that he didn't want him to die in battle and become a martyr and an even bigger hero than he already was.  He was afraid that would mobilize Teddy supporters and Wilson's political enemies against him even more.  Wilson, by the way, possibly the worst president ever. 

Roosevelt was an imperialist and a war mongerer and definitely had his faults, but no one can ever accuse him of not having the biggest balls of any president ever.  The guy gave a speech minutes after an assassination attempt with a seeping bleeding bullet hole in his chest, and began the speech (in the days before microphones), "Friends, I shall ask you to be as quiet as possible.  I don’t know whether you fully understand that I have just been shot.”  

Last edited on Wed Dec 7th, 2016 07:27 pm by srossi

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srossi wrote: Just finished a book about Teddy Roosevelt's expedition where he discovered The River of Doubt in The Amazon and nearly died. Amazing book, amazing story. Can you imagine any president today doing something like that after he was out of office?  He literally put 1,000 miles of river on the map. And when he got sick he wanted to commit suicide in the jungle so he wouldn't slow down the rest of the expedition, and the only thing that stopped him was the team insisting that they would try to carry his body out for a proper burial and that would slow them down even more.
It wouldn't happen to have been The River of Doubt by Candice Millard, would it?  I'm reading her book Destiny of the Republic right now, which is about James Garfield and his assassin Charles Guiteau.  I'm 100 pages in and totally hooked.  Garfield is a guy no one thinks about in the pantheon of Presidents, due to his very short time in office, but Millard sells him as someone who would have likely accomplished much in terms of finally healing the country of its Civil War wounds.  As she portrays him there was much that both conservatives and SJW types could appreciate.  He was amazingly progressive for his time in terms of race relations, but also believed in running a limited and accountable government. 

Millard is a great storyteller and I see that she also wrote the above book about Roosevelt's South American expedition.  I'm going to pick it up when I'm done with this book. 

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Started reading Pat Patterson's autobiography. It was in the adult section of Barnes and Noble

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I ordered this a couple days ago, and even though it was clearly priced (and worth) $9.99, the end sale price was $1.99.
Hooker by Lou Thesz, eBook for the Kindle app.
I am enjoying it tremendously.

https://www.amazon.com/HOOKER-Lou-Thesz-ebook/dp/B00JDHBM9O/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

srossi

 

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pjstef wrote: I ordered this a couple days ago, and even though it was clearly priced (and worth) $9.99, the end sale price was $1.99.
Hooker by Lou Thesz, eBook for the Kindle app.
I am enjoying it tremendously.

https://www.amazon.com/HOOKER-Lou-Thesz-ebook/dp/B00JDHBM9O/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

I got an autographed copy of that book many years ago direct from his website(although "book" is putting it loosely because the version I have is more like a binder).  You have to take some of Thesz's biases with a grain of salt obviously, but aside from that it's a tremendous read for anyone interested in the early days of wrestling and the various political games and shoot/work scenarios of the day.  It was really good.  I might have to read it again soon.

Last edited on Tue Jul 11th, 2017 06:27 pm by srossi

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Reading the lengthy introduction by Charlie Thesz, it seems she gave the go-ahead a handful of years ago for the book to be edited for blatant errors while not clouding the spirit of what Lou wanted to get across, as well as be re-published in a proper format (Crowbar Press).

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Marvel's Secret Empire. issue #0-#9

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Mobsters in our midst - a book about the KC mob.

Last edited on Tue Mar 20th, 2018 06:10 pm by Franchise

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Bloodshot #1
Shadowman #1

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I'll be spending 19 hours on airplanes tomorrow.  I'm bringing with me Jordan Peterson's 12 Rules For Life.

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Franchise wrote: Mobsters in our midst - a book about the KC mob.
That sounds interesting.  I've always wondered why KC, of all places, was such a powerful hub for the mob. 

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The Russian Five by Keith Gave

It's about how he helped convince Sergei Fedorov and Vladimir Konstantinov to defect from Russia and join the Red Wings. I'm only half way through chapter 1, but my Dad and brother-in-law said it's awesome.

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I just picked up the Pillman book and the dynamite kid book. I picked up the kid book years ago back before Feinstein had his issues and RF had a kiosk at the Ontario mills mall but I lost it somewhere along the way. I don’t really have plans to read either anytime soon but I was in a buying mood the other night on amazon and got them both.

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Batman long Halloween graphic novel. I picked this up with 9 graphic novels of thanos.

Long Halloween was a good sized collection 400 or so pages but was interesting; Gave the genesis of 2 face. I’ll probably pick up some more Batman down the road.

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I have recently started reading Carlos Castaneda series. A grea fan of his trips.

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Bernard Cornwell's Sharpe's Trafalgar.


I read a bunch of his Richard Sharpe series of books years ago, but I have started over again and am now reading them in chronological order as opposed to the date that he published them.

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I picked up Dr D’s Don’t call me fake and it’s a hell of a book. I lose interest easily when reading but this book kept me going. The print is a little large and it has a lot of pages that are just pictures but so far it’s cool as hell.


I also recently picked up a pile of graphic novels

Son of Satan (original run)
Moon Knight epic collection 1,2 and the 3rd
Avengers v The Darkhold 

Last edited on Sun Apr 7th, 2019 04:17 am by Franchise

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KGB wrote: Franchise wrote: Mobsters in our midst - a book about the KC mob.
That sounds interesting.  I've always wondered why KC, of all places, was such a powerful hub for the mob. 


I put the book down after a few chapters it was very slow, I’ll circle back down the road 

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Franchise wrote: I just picked up the Pillman book and the dynamite kid book. I picked up the kid book years ago back before Feinstein had his issues and RF had a kiosk at the Ontario mills mall but I lost it somewhere along the way. I don’t really have plans to read either anytime soon but I was in a buying mood the other night on amazon and got them both.I haven't had the privilege of reading the Plillman book. Pure Dynamite was the first wrestling book I ever read, and til this day, probably in my top 5. The reason I like it best is because Tom buries himself so much, you know he's not bullshitting when it comes to his crazy stories. Great book.

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Commander in Cheat. written by sportscaster Rick Reilly

Just finished a chapter where Trump was playing against Tiger Woods. Playing on opposite sides of the course Trump hits ball in water. Tells someone to give him another ball saying Woods didn't see. Hits ball again in water. Walks over to water and gets another ball and drops it on the ground.

hahaha

Last edited on Wed Jun 12th, 2019 08:29 pm by Benlen

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Benlen wrote: Commander in Cheat. written by sportscaster Rick Reilly

Just finished a chapter where Trump was playing against Tiger Woods. Playing on opposite sides of the course Trump hits ball in water. Tells someone to give him another ball saying Woods didn't see. Hits ball again in water. Walks over to water and gets another ball and drops it on the ground.

hahaha

I'm not very interested in the book, but I heard some of Reilly's interviews when he was promoting it.  Some hilarious stories, if they didn't so aptly describe the pettiness of the most powerful man in the world.

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Ready Player One. Really good and kind of scary about a future where everyone is logged into a VR world most of the time. Its actually a fun book to read, very well written and worlds better than the movie (which wasn't bad IMO).

Also read Armada, by the same author. Another really good book.

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Batman Damned #1-#3

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I've went on a rock biography streak.  I just finished Mick Wall's book on Lemmy released shortly after his death, and now I've begun Bruce Dickinson's autobiography.

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I'm about half way through the Jim Ross Slobberknocker book. Major disappointment so far. Ross just quickly glances over all the major storyies, not going into details on much. Almost every chapter is 3 pages or less.

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The last half of the JR book wasn't much better. It's worth the read if you can pick it up for under 8bucks.

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Just finished Sherlock Holmes and the Autumn of Terror. It's a take on if Sherlock Holmes was tasked to solve the Jack the Ripper murders. It's really well written, and the author does a great job in flipping between modern day (when John Watson's great grandson opens a sealed vault containing unpublished memoirs from Holmes' cases that were deemed too sensitive at the time to be published) and when the murders happened. Highly recommended

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wittman2 wrote: Just finished Sherlock Holmes and the Autumn of Terror. It's a take on if Sherlock Holmes was tasked to solve the Jack the Ripper murders. It's really well written, and the author does a great job in flipping between modern day (when John Watson's great grandson opens a sealed vault containing unpublished memoirs from Holmes' cases that were deemed too sensitive at the time to be published) and when the murders happened. Highly recommended
I read it and it was great.



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