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beejmi
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As in years past Papa Voo will be covering the NFL draft for us live "as he always does for us" as it all unfolds. As each team makes it's pick Papa Voo will give us what he has in terms of notes and things that are out there on the newly drafted player.

Everyone is welcome to join in the conversation and sprinkle in their opinions. With the rookie salary structure being made more realistic it should open the door to more more "wheeling and dealing" and a more active draft day.

I'll leave it up to Papa Voo exactly how many rounds of the draft he covers. And I certainly appreciate what he does for us each year.

Hopefully your team drafts the right running back, the right safety and the best tackle that they so desperately need in 2012.

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Welcome to the
2012 NFL/S&W Draft!









Papa Voo



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Buffalo looking for deal to move up, possibly to No. 3, to snag Matt Kalil. 

What would you do if you were Minnesota?  I think if the deal is half-way decent, take it.  There are holes all around on that team. 


http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/blog/eye-on-football/18841860/report-bills-have-legitimate-interest-in-trading-up-to-no-3-for-matt-kalil

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Here are some mock drafts, if you would want to review them from cbssportsline:


http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/mock

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pass

beejmi
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I believe that every single team is lying (LOL)

Papa Voo



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We have some Cowboys fans on this board (with sympathy), so here are some things being said about the Silver & Blue:

http://www.sbnation.com/2012-nfl-draft/2012/4/26/2976695/nfl-draft-2012-dallas-cowboys-david-decastro

Quite an indepth look at the draft for the Cowboys:

http://thelandryhat.com/2012/04/26/cowboys-2012-draft-day-edition-a-final-glance-at-pick-14/

Washington Post outlook for the Cowboys and the draft:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/redskins/draft-2012-expect-cowboys-to-get-defensive-in-draft-after-filling-many-needs-in-free-agency/2012/04/24/gIQA8p7seT_story.html

Last edited on Thu Apr 26th, 2012 10:31 pm by Papa Voo

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I know there are Eagles fans amongst us, also.  Too bad.

Should the Eagles draft best athlete or need?

http://news.bostonherald.com/sports/columnists/view/20120426les_bowen_eagles_trying_to_reverse_a_trend_at_top_of_the_draft/srvc=home&position=recent

SI article:

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2012/football/nfl/wires/04/24/2020.ap.fbn.draft.eagles.1st.ld.writethru.1120/index.html

De-fense!

http://www.bellinghamherald.com/2012/04/25/2496561/eagles-expected-to-go-defense.html


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Da Bears!


Rumors and rumors of the draft for the Bears!

http://www.bellinghamherald.com/2012/04/25/2496561/eagles-expected-to-go-defense.html

Another team looking to improve the defense.
http://www.southbendtribune.com/sports/ct-spt-0426-nfl-draft-bears-chicago--20120426,0,6517753.story

Could it be Merilus.....or maybe Copels?

http://www.southbendtribune.com/sports/ct-spt-0426-nfl-draft-bears-chicago--20120426,0,6517753.story

beejmi
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Looking forward to Philly reaching for someone that should be a second or third round pick under the guise that they are smarter than everyone else

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J-E-T-S!  



Important draft for the Jets?? 10 overall picks!


http://espn.go.com/new-york/nfl/story/_/id/7853651/2012-nfl-draft-mike-tannenbaum-missed-several-draft-picks-needs-get-right-year


Could Michael Floyd be heading to the Big Apple?

http://www.rantsports.com/new-york-jets/2012/04/26/new-york-jets-2012-nfl-draft-profile-notre-dame-wr-michael-floyd/

There has been some talk about the possibility of the Jets trying to sneak up to take Richardson. 

http://www.sbnation.com/2012-nfl-draft/2012/4/25/2975050/2012-nfl-draft-news-trent-richardson-new-york-jets

Last edited on Thu Apr 26th, 2012 10:49 pm by Papa Voo

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The Chargers with what's his name still coaching them.

Chargers may be looking east for their No. 1 pick

http://isportsweb.com/2012/04/25/possible-san-diego-chargers-draft-target-spotlight-olb-adrian-robinson/


Smith and Turner need to turn this ship around starting with the draft.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/redskins/draft-2012-pivotal-draft-awaits-smith-chargers-after-missing-playoffs-2-straight-years/2012/04/23/gIQANtOMcT_story.html




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Super Bowl champions on the clock.

Could it be a tight end or running back?

http://www.nj.com/giants/index.ssf/2012/04/nfl_draft_projecting_giants_fi.html


Late picks not necessarily bad picks

http://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/redskins/draft-2012-champion-giants-will-have-to-wait-late-to-make-pick-in-first-round-of-nfl-draft/2012/04/24/gIQAVuJneT_story.html


Papa Voo



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Stilllers needing to get younger!

Help with the o-line in the First round?

http://pittsburgh.sbnation.com/pittsburgh-steelers/2012/4/26/2975361/nfl-mock-draft-2012-steelers-mike-mayock-pittsburgh

They got plenty of needs this year.

http://blog.pennlive.com/pasports/2012/04/pittsburgh_steelers_2012_nfl_draft_preview.html


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The Browns make the first big move with a trade up to No. 3.

Could it be that the Brown thought that the Jets may have been making a move to get Richardson?

CBSSports.com's Mike Freeman has confirmed the Browns have traded up to No. 3 with the Vikings and Cleveland has given up a fourth, fifth and seventh-round pick in this year's draft to do so.

Which doesn't make a ton of sense. We assume the Browns will take Alabama running back Trent Richardson, but considering the Vikings – who obviously have Adrian Peterson and now will pick fourth – most likely weren't going to take Richardson, we'll have to wait and hear about the explanations for this move.

Or if the Browns really want to take Richardson after all.






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Browns also traded the following to Minnesota to move up:


The Browns also sent their picks in the fourth, fifth and seventh rounds, according to the NFL Network.

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That's stupid.  What the fuck is Holmgreen thinking?  Only thing I can think is they're afraid that someone like the Bucs would trade up with the Vikings and take whomever it is that the Browns want (Richardson or Blackmon)...


Papa Voo



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The No. 1 Overall Pick in the 2012 NFL Draft




Andrew Luck, QB School: Stanford

It seemed appropriate for a long time that Luck was hailed as the second coming of Peyton Manning, even if that isn't technically accurate. After all, Indianapolis has the first pick in the draft and that second-coming stuff goes hand-in-hand with Luck being considered the logical heir to the cerebral offense Manning ran so well for the Colts. But Luck isn't exactly Manning. And, after considerable changes, the Colts aren't the same Colts. So that begs the question -- are Luck and the Colts still a logical match?

Last year he yielded the Heisman to Baylor quarterback Robert Griffin III, who is listed behind Luck on almost every draft list, including that of NFLDraftScout.com. But since the end of the season, more scouts questioned whether Luck really is a better pro prospect than the athletic RG3. Most still concede Luck is the safer pick. To be clear, Luck is a truly exceptional athlete himself, with workout results similar to those of Cam Newton. He is the son of Oliver Luck, former Detroit Lions and Houston Oilers quarterback and current Athletic Director at West Virginia, and masterfully manipulated a pro-style offense coached until last year by former NFL quarterback Jim Harbaugh, now with the 49ers. Luck can make every throw required, but, like almost everyone else, doesn't play with the urgency of Manning. His athleticism, genetics and coaching resulted in amazing college statistics. He completed 713 of 1,064 passes (67 percent) for 9,430 yards, 82 touchdowns, 22 interceptions and a passer rating of 162.8. And, while those are spectacular stats, Luck is expected finally to be the No. 1 because he is the safe pick.

Accuracy: Possesses extraordinary accuracy to all levels of the field. Consistently throws his receivers open, leading his receivers to where the defenders are least likely to be able to impact the reception or stop the receiver from gaining additional yardage. Zips the deep out low and outside. Excellent touch down the seam to fit the ball between the linebacker and safety over the top. Leads his backs on swing passes and receivers on slants/crossers so that they do not have to break stride. Rare accuracy extends to the deep ball, as well, as he throws a tight spiral with good trajectory that makes his passes easy to track over the shoulder. Trusts his accuracy too much, at times, showing a willingness to throw too often into coverage. In his two multiple INT games of his young career (Oregon 2010, Arizona State 2010) all four of his interceptions were thrown into double coverage. Arm Strength: Doesn't boast a Matt Stafford-like howitzer, but has plenty of arm strength to make every NFL throw. Fires the deep out from the opposite hash without having to wind up. Confident in the pocket despite pressure around him, as he's shown the ability to make 50+ yard throws even with defenders pulling him down (Arizona State). Setup/Release: Takes virtually all of his snaps from under center. Quick-footed and balanced in dropping back, scanning the field. Clearly is comfortable in the pocket, stepping up, sliding left or right and dipping his shoulder to avoid contact while setting up to throw. Rarely retreats or takes his way away from the secondary to look at the rush. Boasts a textbook throwing motion. Has an efficient over-the-top release, stepping into the throw and ending with a clean follow-through. The ball doesn't explode out of his hand as it does some passers with greater arm strength, but the fluid motion -- like a smooth golf swing -- generates plenty of torque.

Reading Defenses: Put simply, it is Luck's recognition of defenses that might be his most extraordinary accomplishment. Had full freedom to call audibles at the line and takes advantage of his recognition to improve the offense's chance at a successful play, including often switching from passing plays to handoffs and bootlegs. Often will look one way and throw the other, leaving defenders with very little time to react. As mentioned previously, he does need to improve his decision-making, at times, as he will occasionally take unnecessary risks throwing the ball into double coverage. On The Move: Perhaps the most underrated element of his game. Possesses very good straight-line speed for the quarterback position, as well as vision, enough mobility to evade defenders in the open field (not in tight quarters, however) and good strength. Doesn't take unnecessary hits and looks to slide or run out of bounds when he scrambles, but isn't afraid of lowering his shoulder to get the first down or score. Intangibles: A winner who helped elevate the Stanford program. Highly intelligent; was the valedictorian at Stratford High. Elected to return for his fourth year at Stanford in large part due to the fact that he wanted to finish his degree. Father, Oliver Luck, is a former West Virginia and Houston Oiler quarterback who now serves as the Athletic Director at his alma mater.

Any predictions at this time on the success that Luck will have in Indy?   He is going to need weapons around him.  

The only downside I see for him is having Bruce Arians, but then again, Arians may not get into the feel-good relationship he had with Roethlisberger which got creepy at times.




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DaNkinator wrote: That's stupid.  What the fuck is Holmgreen thinking?  Only thing I can think is they're afraid that someone like the Bucs would trade up with the Vikings and take whomever it is that the Browns want (Richardson or Blackmon)...




That is what I think.  Could be the Jets creeping up.

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With the 2nd Pick of the 2012 NFL Draft

The Washington Redskins select....






Robert Griffin III, QB School: Baylor

A three-year starter, Robert Griffin III (RG3) was a highly-touted football and track recruit out of high school, choosing Baylor over Houston and Stanford. He earned the starting quarterback job in 2008 as an 18-year old true freshman, going 160-for-267 (59.9%) for 2,091 yards, 15 touchdowns and 3 interceptions. He also rushed for 843 yards on 173 carries (4.9) and 13 scores, earning Big 12 freshman and newcomer of the year honors. Griffin started the first three games of 2009, but a serious knee injury ended his season early, taking a medical redshirt. He returned healthy in 2010 as a sophomore and started all 13 games, finishing 304-for-454 (67.0%) for 3,501 yards, 22 touchdowns and 8 interceptions. He added 635 rush yards on 149 attempts (4.3) and 8 scores, earning Second Team All-Big 12 and comeback player of the year honors. Griffin was extremely productive in 2011 and set several career-highs as a junior (13 starts), going 291-for-402 (72.4%) for 4,293 yards, 37 touchdowns, 6 interceptions and 699 yds on 179 carries (3.9) and 10 scores. He earned several postseason awards after the 2011 season, including the Heisman Trophy and Davey O?Brien award winner and was a First Team All-American and All-Big 12 honors. Griffin decided to forego his final season of eligibility and enter the 2012 NFL Draft. Griffin is an impressive all-around athlete and isn?t afraid to run and use his world-class speed if the situation calls for it, but he?s a pass-first quarterback with above average arm strength ? his on-field swagger and winning attitude is contagious. He has shown outstanding progression as a passer since his freshman year, but he needs to improve his pocket presence, looking to make too many of his throws outside the pocket ? still far from a finished product and needs to continue his development. Griffin has the skill-set and intelligence to thrive in any offense, but all of his experience comes from a spread, quick-strike formation. He has only adequate height and overall frame so durability is a concern because of his propensity to take a lot of hits, but he?s extremely tough. Griffin is very confident and a first-class individual that will endear himself to pro teams. He is still unpolished in several aspects of his game, but there is something special about him, flashing some of the same clutch, field-general qualities Cam Newton did last season ? a natural throwing the ball with better than expected passing traits and a knack for making plays. Griffin is the clear-cut second QB in this draft class and will hear his name in the top-10 picks of the draft, possibly as early as the #2 overall selection.

Accuracy: A natural passer with very good accuracy and ball placement, especially on the run. Very impressive career completion percentage (67.1%) in college. Has very good downfield touch with beautiful deep ball accuracy. Impressive feel on bucket and long throws. His accuracy dips on throws inside the pocket and looks most comfortable when he can get outside the hashmarks. Arm Strength: An effortless passer with above average arm strength. Can make all the throws and drives the ball downfield, not shy about unleashing his cannon of an arm. Setup/Release: Has a quick release and does a nice job with play fakes. Gutsy and fearless, standing tall in the pocket even when he knows the hit is coming. Has inconsistent lower bodymechanics with messy footwork, throwing of his back foot far too often. Has a three-quarters delivery and unconventional throwing motion with low delivery and release point. Operated out of a shotgun spread offense with various zone and option schemes at Baylor, but hardly a complicated playbook ... doesn't have experience taking snaps from under center.

Reading Defenses: Sees the entire field and works through his progressions, manipulating the pocket and keeping his eyes downfield. Holds the ball too long and needs to improve his pocket awareness, abandoning his reads too easily. Streaky internal clock and looks to get outside of the pocket too soon. Has questionable vision as a passer, staring down defenders and making puzzling decisions at times. Still makes too many mental mistakes and needs to polish the mental aspect of his game. Forces throws and doesn't look off defenders - throws across his body too much and doesn't anticipate defenders as well as he needs to yet. Needs to develop better pre-snap awareness to see the blitz and recognize what the defense is doing. On the Move: An elite athlete with quick feet and superior speed - smooth, flexible and leggy. Has magic escapability and adds an extra dimension with his legs. Makes something out of nothing, keeping defenders off balance and forcing poor angles because of his jets. Very good patience, vision and instincts as a runner with football toughness - more than simply a track athlete. Has a lean frame and only adequate height. Not frail, but doesn't have the body type to withstand a consistent beating. Has more straight-line speed than shifty burst and has added 20+ pounds since his peak as a track star. Has some ball security questions as a runner with several fumbles on his resume. Holds the ball too long and takes unnecessary hits, getting beat up physically - strong durability concerns and suffered a serious knee injury in 2009. Intangibles: Exudes the natural leadership and confidence on the field that teammates respond to and follow. Very tough-minded and not afraid to take chances. Never allows himself to get too high or too low and the situation never seems too much. A determined passer ... thrower first and runner second. Very smart in the classroom and his intelligence translates well to the field ... graduated from Baylor in Dec. 2010 with a degree in political science and is currently working on his master's degree. He possesses "wow" playmaking ability with a clutch gene. Plays poised and in control late in games and is comfortable in the "big" moment. Griffin is a team-first guy and is highly competitive. Winner and leads by example. Has off-the-chart intangibles and coaches rave about his work ethic, practice habits and overall character. Has very good starting experience as a three-year starter (40 career starts) and was the youngest starting quarterback in college football in 2008. Highly productive at the college level and set or tied 54 school records at Baylor and several other NCAA marks ... one of only three players in college football history to throw for 10,000+ passing yds and rush for 2,000+ yds in his career (Dan LeFevour, Colin Kaepernick). In 2011, Griffin led the Bears to their first bowl win since 1992 and was the first Heisman Trophy winner from Baylor since 1963. He set several records in track - in both high school and college.


Definitely a play-maker, but can RG3 lead the team in crunch time?  Still very raw in some techniques like looking off receivers and waits for the play to break down looking for the big play.  Sounds a little like McNair and Roethsliberger, because he gets criticized for holding the ball too long. 

Predictions?


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Will Shanahan ruin RG3?  

Another big question!

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Griffin will do great if Shanahan gears the the playbook toward RGIII's strengths. Give him an opportunity to play his game.

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Papa Voo wrote: Will Shanahan ruin RG3?  

Another big question!

Yes.


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With the 3rd overall pick in the 2012 Draft, the Cleveland Browns select....



Trent Richardson, RB School: Alabama 

Richardson doesn't have world class speed, much the same as Emmitt Smith didn't have world class speed, and the comparison is apt. So forget the so-called controversy about his speed, which was quantified with 40-yard times of between 4.45 and 4.61 seconds at his pro day (Smith's 40 time was 4.8 seconds). Richardson explodes into and through defenders with sudden power. He is wide, low and runs with patience and control while looking for a lane. But if there isn't daylight, he is willing and able to create it by initiating contact in a manner reminiscent of a short, stout Adrian Petersen. Richardson is a better pro prospect than former Heisman Trophy winner Mark Ingram (No. 28 pick in 2011draft by New Orleans Saints), whose job Richardson inherited at Alabama. Last season, Richardson became Alabama's full-time starter for the first time, carried 283 times for 1,679 yards and 21 touchdowns to break Ingram's single-season school record. Richardson is an efficient blocker and excellent pass catcher who had another 338 yards and three touchdowns receiving last season. He was the only hint of offense in the BCS Championship game, scoring the lone touchdown, a 34-yarder, in the Tide's 21-0 victory over LSU. Richardson, who finished third in Heisman Trophy voting, is proud and responsible for two daughters, ages three and five, from a longtime romance in his home town Pensacola, FL.
 
 
Inside: Powerful runner well suited to running inside the tackles. Quickly presses the line of scrimmage, attacking the hole when it is there. Shows the patience to allow the hole to develop, however, and has the vision and burst to bounce outside should there be a better opportunity available there. Possesses an exciting combination of acceleration and agility to elude defenders. Seems to relish physical contact, lowering his shoulder into would-be tacklers and running through many of them. Rarely goes down with initial contact, showing a stiff-arm and the leg drive to bowl over defenders. Wraps the ball securely in tight quarters and has only one fumble (LSU, 2010) in 321 career touches (entering 2011 season). Outside: Significantly faster than
his relatively short, thick-frame would lead you to believe. Beats the linebackers to the edge and can plant either foot in the ground and spring forward quickly, showing surprising acceleration. Possesses very good vision for cutback lanes, showing a willingness to cut back against the grain inside or break it outside depending on where he sees the defense leaning. Has the speed to pull away from defenders when he enters the open field. Switches the ball to his outside arm to help protect it as he nears the sideline. Breaking tackles: Probably Richardson's most impressive trait. Often he is the one initiating the contact rather than the defenders, providing them little to target than his helmet, shoulder and knee pads. Keeps his legs driving through contact and literally runs over some opponents. Features a terrific stiff-arm, as well as a spin move through contact and the ability to leap over defenders attempting to cut his legs out from under him.
 
Blocking:  Physical blocker whose intensity and power make him a potentially lethal weapon in the blocking game. Can be confused by exotic blitzes, sometimes technically picking up the wrong defender, but is willing to lay out to meet his assignment in the hole. Gets low and explodes into the defender, making the emphatic block. Would like to see him remain on his feet and square so as to protect his quarterback (and his own body) longer. Receiving: Possesses soft, generally reliable hands out of the backfield. Is comfortable catching the ball outside of his frame, extending to pluck it and secure it quickly before worrying about oncoming defenders. Used on a variety of routes in this offense, showing the speed and fluidity to get open on wheel and quick screens, as well as traditional swing passes. Muffed a punt against Duke (2010) on a kickoff return, only to recover it and run 91 yards for a touchdown... Intangibles: Signed with Alabama as a consensus five-star recruit and rated by some scouting services among the elite prospects at any position in the entire country. Possesses an almost unheard combination of size, strength and speed. Boasts a power clean of 365 pounds, a 600 pound squat and a bench press of 475 pounds. Has reportedly been timed by the Alabama coaching staff in the 4.4s in the 40-yard dash. His work ethic in the weight-room has been characterized as "legendary." Underwent surgery following his sophomore season in high school to repair torn ligaments in his ankle. Has two daughters.

Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 12:22 am by Papa Voo

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With the 4th Pick, the Minnesota Vikings select.....



Matt Kalil, OT School: Southern California

Based on family history, Matt Kalil was destined to be an outstanding physical specimen. His father was a pro football player, his brother is a starter in the NFL and his mother was Miss California. Now pro scouts say he soon may be regarded as the best in the family, not counting mom of course, although Matt was recognized by Playboy Magazine himself - as a 2011 Preseason All American. "Genetics are obviously a huge part," acknowledged Pittsburgh Steelers General Manager Kevin Colbert, who considered Kalil's situation similar to that of the NFL's famous Mathews family, which begat current Green Bay Packers linebacker, Clay, and tracks back three generationsto grandfather Clay (49ers in 1950s) and includes uncle Bruce (Houston Oilers/Tennessee Titans 1983-2001; Pro Football Hall of Fame). Matt's father, Frank, was drafted by the Buffalo Bills and played for the USFL's Arizona Wranglers and Houston Gamblers. Matt's older brother Ryan was a star center at USC (2003-2006) and after being drafted in the second round by the Carolina Panthers has become one of the best centers in the NFL. Vikings General Manager Rick Spielman says Kalil is not only the best tackle the draft, but he has a nasty temperament to go with his physical abilities that could make him one of the best in the NFL and, oh yes, possible best in the family. Matt credits his father for instilling him with work ethic and technique to enhance his bloodlines. "Hours on end of going to the park and working on technique," Kalil said when asked what he remembered about getting help from his father. "Watching film in high school and coming home on weekends during college and going over film with my dad. That's what he taught us, there's always something you can improve. You strive for perfection, but you never get there." NFL scouts believe he is as close to perfect as they can expect and one of the most complete offensive tackles to come out of college since USC's Tony Boselli, who was the second player selected in the 1995 draft by the Jacksonville Jaguars. Not a relative, but a highly-regarded alum.

Pass blocking: Eases out of his stance, showing good patience to allow defenders to come to him. Plays with textbook balance and technique: knees bent, shoulders square and on the balls of his feet. Has good arm length and upper-body strength to steer defenders aside. Has the power and agility to mirror and when he sets his hands, it's generally game over. Has a tendency to be lazy fundamentally and is susceptible to elite lateral agility. Good recognition skills.

Run blocking:
Fires off the snap. Has a prototypical build and strength of an NFL offensive lineman. Maintains good pad level and has the strength in his upper body and leg drive to knock his opponent off the ball. Quick to the second level. Flashes some nastiness to pancake off-balance opponents. Pulling/trapping: Limited experience, unlimited potential in this area. Comfortable on the hoof, showing plenty of athleticism and recognition to handle blocking in space. Effective, experienced trap blocker.

Initial Quickness: Decent initial quickness and a smooth, patient style about him when in pass protection. Rarely allows an outside pressure despite operating against hybrid fronts and many undersized pass rushers. Has good quickness off the snap when run blocking, though his strength and hand placement are more critical to his success.

Downfield: Finds his assignment quickly with good enough lateral agility and balance on the move to blast through target with an emphatic punch. Scouts would like to see more of a fiery, typical o-line temperament. Seems content to do enough to win the one-on-one matchup when he could wipe out defenders.

Intangibles: Younger brother (Ryan) and father (Frank) played D-I college football (Ryan at USC, Frank at Arkansas, Arizona) and in the NFL. Played special teams and blocked five kicks over the past two seasons, including four in 2011.


Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 12:30 am by Papa Voo

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With the 5th Pick, the Jacksonville Jaguars select....


Justin Blackmon, WR School: Oklahoma State


After scoring 38 touchdowns in his last 25 games, comparisons to the gifted Dez Bryant, whom he replaced at Oklahoma State, are the good and bad news. His ability is as obvious as the two Fred Belitnikoff awards he won as the top college wide receiver. But he must dedicate himself to reach his ample potential in the NFL. Like Bryant (now with Dallas), Blackmon has astonishing instincts, body control and the ability to take charge of a game. Also like Bryant, Blackmon has had some issues off the field, in fact some of them with Bryant. This is a concern for teams considering spending millions of dollars on Blackmon. In college, Blackmon replaced Bryant with a flourish in 2010, catching 111 passes for 1,782 yards, breaking Larry Fitzgerald's record for sophomores, and 20 touchdowns. He set an NCAA record with at least 100 yards and one touchdown in all 12 games in a season. Blackmon then added 122 catches, 1,522 yards and 18 touchdowns last season. He was devastating in the big games, grabbing five for 157, two touchdowns in the 2011 Alamo Bowl against Nebraska's Prince Amukamara (now with N. Y. Giants) and then finishing his college career with eight catches, 182 yards and touchdowns of 43, 67 and 17 yards in a 41-38 overtime win over Stanford in the 2012 Fiesta Bowl. Blackmon is a gamer who plays faster than his clock speed and bigger, tougher than his measurements and is especially dangerous after the catch. After not running at the Scouting Combine, Blackmon clocked a 40-yard dash in 4.46 seconds and soared 35 inches in the vertical jump at his pro day. Off-field concerns include a DUI arrest in October, 2010 in Arlington, Texas when, not coincidentally, he went to visit Bryant and see a Cowboys' game.

Release: Physical player able to get off press coverage to release up the sideline or position himself inside the cornerback on slants and crossing routes. Does not have elite speed to separate after his release but uses strength to get a half-step on defensive backs.

Hands:
Has strong hands any NFL receivers coach and quarterback would covet for their team. Tracks the deep ball over either shoulder and brings in passes fluidly without breaking stride down the field. Fights for the ball in the air, has good vertical explosiveness and strong hands to bring it down in traffic. Does not always use his hands to secure deep throws, allowing the ball into his pads and chest. Had a few drops in2010, losing concentration when trying to make a move or feeling a hit coming.

Route running: Typically lines up outside, but will be in the slot at times to use his physicality to move the chains. Best when using his size to get inside position for slants and post patterns. Often used on deep routes, getting separation down the sideline or over the middle on crossing routes by extending his arms rather than pure speed. Flashes the feet and balance to excel on comeback routes, but only occasionally runs that route in OSU's offense. Will come back to help his quarterback when coverage breaks down.

After the catch: Strong runner with the ball with enough agility to make defenders miss in the open field. Used on quick screens despite his size because he can head-fake linebackers and stiff-arm smaller defenders. Aware of the sideline, gets two feet inbounds and can quickly turn upfield to get additional yardage. Does not have exceptional straight-line speed but takes advantage of open seams when his quarterback is on target. Combines his strength and fair acceleration to turn short passes into long gains when defenders are in his midst.

Blocking: Has enough upper-body strength and tenacity to be very effective as a downfield blocker. Is not shy about taking on his man, provides some pop and will open a running lane for his back at the next level. Inconsistent hitting his target or sustaining, however, allowing his man to get into the play.

Intangibles: Scouts have character concerns about Blackmon. Arrested for misdemeanor DUI in October 2010 and suspended for one game. Suffered a high left ankle sprain in 2010 against Kansas. Young player who was a full-time starter for only one season.


Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 12:35 am by Papa Voo

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Dallas trade with St. Louis to move up to the 6th position.  Dallas selects....



Morris Claiborne, CB School: LSU


Claiborne arrived at LSU expecting to play wide receiver, but was moved to corner as a freshman at the insistence of teammate Patrick Peterson. In 2010, Claiborne started opposite Peterson (No. 5 overall selection in 2011 draft, Arizona Cardinals) in what will be remembered as one of the best cornerback tandems in college history. Peterson won the Jim Thorpe Award as the nation's top defensive back in 2010 and Claiborne won the award himself last season when he grabbed six of his 11 career interceptions. That popular term shutdown corner comes to mind watching Claiborne, who has in-your-face coverage instincts and is one of the best returners in this draft. A versatile athlete, "Mo" piled up 2,000 all-purpose yards and30 touchdowns at quarterback as senior at Shreveport's Fair Park High School, where he also played baseball, basketball and won the Louisiana State 4A, 110-meter championship (10.76 seconds). Little wonder he is dangerous with the ball, evidenced by a college career total of 274 yards after the theft, including an 89-yard touchdown. He also averaged 28.8 yards last year on kickoff returns, including a 99-yard touchdown. At the Scouting Combine his unofficial time in 40 yards was an acceptable 4.50, but his speed wasn't in question. Claiborne will need to add bulk to be competitive at the next level.

Man Coverage: Size, quick feet and reach allow him to be effective in press, press-bail and "off" coverage. Rarely loses a step off the line because of his length and subtle knack for maintaining contact on the move. Packs a solid punch when extending near the line to re-route receivers. Gives up significant weight and mass to top NFL receivers. Lazy and high in his backpedal on occasion, receivers lull him to sleep and get a step on him with a quick move.

Zone Coverage: Used primarily in man. Has the physical tools to handle zone and is not contact-shy. Doesn't give up many yards after the catch -- long arms to pull down receivers and intensity to stick his nose in the pile. Recovers well but overestimates his closing speed and angle in zone.

Ball Skills: Former receiver has the hands to make difficult catches and will jump routes. Comfortable with the ball, elusive and has good vision after the catch. Often plays the man and doesn't get his head around to find the ball. Run Support: Used on run blitzes on occasion with size and length as a tackler. Holds up his man, maintains outside leverage, and sheds to make the tackle if needed on most plays. Has to be aware of coverage call and avoid overpursuit, giving up the sideline.

Tackling: Arm length and tenacious attitude make him a solid, if not fearsome, tackler on the edge. Height and flexibility to attack the thigh of opponents instead of needing to cut or grab an ankle. Not afraid to throw a shoulder but will miss tackles if he doesn't wrap in the NFL. Intangibles: Stood up well to being targeted by teams in 2010 while playing across from Patrick Peterson. Still learning the position, but coaches and teammates consider him a great student.

Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 12:39 am by Papa Voo

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Good move and big move by Dallas!

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Papa Voo wrote: Good move and big move by Dallas!

Great move. Love it.

ChrisOTL

 

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brodiescomics wrote:
Papa Voo wrote: Good move and big move by Dallas!

Great move. Love it.

^

rams fans should be happy, theyre loading up on picks.

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With the 7th selection, Tampa Bay Bucs take...






Mark Barron, SS
School: Alabama


Barron was the on-field quarterback for Alabama's complex and devastating defense. After the snap, he became an enforcer whose physical play was a reason Alabama's defense was No. 1 in the nation. He was especially responsible for preventing the big play, which he did well enough to be named first team All-American in 2011. However, as a college strong safety trying to find a place in the pass-happy NFL, Barron might have benefitted by showing in workouts that he has the speed and agility to make it at the next level. But after the National Championship game, Barron had surgery to repair a double sports hernia, so he was unable to perform at the Scouting Combine or Alabama's Pro Dayand hopes to hold a pre-draft workout. He appears to have good, but not great, speed and was rarely put in a position where he had to cover a slot receiver man to man. Barron is a strong player, but doesn't seem to be a candidate for getting many letters from the NFL Commissioner for over-the-top hits. He is a high-percentage, formful tackler whose hits might be better for text books than the ESPN Top Ten list. "I like making plays, period," said Barron. "I would say the interception (is his favorite) because that's more of a game-changer. That affects the game more. I like hitting and making interceptions." Barron's play does reflect a combination of great film work and instinctive reactions, which gets him in the middle of action on most plays and rarely allows ballcarriers to get very far beyond the line of scrimmage. "We played in a very difficult defense," Barron said of the Crimson Tide. "We did a lot of different schemes. As far as communicating, I had a lot to do with that on the back end. I feel like sometimes I brought some energy with the hits that I made and things of that nature. So, I did a lot of different things."

Man Coverage: Not often asked to drop down and cover the slot in this scheme. Is a bit stiff in the hips and has only average change of direction. Does show a late burst to close on the football. Zone Coverage: Good instincts and overall athleticism for zone coverage. A bit high in his backpedal as he's a high cut athlete, but can plant and drive downhill on the football. Reads the quarterback's eyes and has good feet, balance and straight-line speed, aiding him in being in consistently good position when in pass coverage.

Ball Skills: Classic ball hawk. Reads the quarterback's eyes and does a nice job of breaking on the throw. Good acceleration and straight-line speed. Very good ball skills for the position. Generally times his leaps well and has good hand-eye coordination to make the difficult grab. Good vision and natural running skills with the football.

Run Support: Reads run quickly and aggressively attacks, taking out blockers when he has help behind him. Unafraid of playing near the line of scrimmage, though he shows only average strength and technique to disengage. Good agility and speed to avoid blockers, showing an ability to make a lot of plays at or near the line of scrimmage. Prone to overrunning the play, however, and leaving potential cutback lanes for backs to exploit.

Tackling: Isn't as reliable an open-field tackler as you'd think, considering his reputation. Flies upfield in run support and can fail to break down properly. Doesn't possess the elite agility to dance with runners in the open field and always make the secure stop. Physical hitter who teases with textbook hit-lift-drive technique, but will also duck his head occasion to make the big hit and miss entirely or fail to wrap up securely and have the ball-carrier spin through his attempted tackle. Among his better traits, however, is his ability to take good angles when in pursuit. Understands his role as the last line of defense and rarely allows ball-carriers to get past him when he is in this position.

Intangibles: Arrested in March 2011 on charges of hindering prosecution, a misdemeanor charge, as police believed he was not telling full truth about one-car accident in his hometown of Mobile. Missed the Capital One Bowl after suffering a torn right pectoral muscle against Auburn. The injury played a major factor in Barron electing to return to Alabama for his senior season.





Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 12:47 am by Papa Voo

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With the 8th overall pick, the Fins select....





Ryan Tannehill, QB
School: Texas A&M



Tannehill arrived in College Station as one of the top dual-threat quarterback prospects in the nation, but showed an exceptional team-first attitude by switching to receiver. When Jerrod Johnson struggled early in the 2010 season due to injury, however, Tannehill stepped in and led the team to six straight wins. Tannehill was a productive receiver who led the team in receptions for his first two seasons. But he saw action at quarterback in 2009 and took over as the starter in 2010. That?s when he started to really catch the eye of NFL scouts. He closed his career with 5,450 passing yards and 42 touchdowns. He is still raw and needs to continue to improve at reading defenses and completing passes to keep the chains moving. But Tannehill possesses a tantalizing combination of size, intelligence, arm strength and mobile. With Southern Cal?s Matt Barkley and Oklahoma?s Landry Jones returning to school, Tannehill is a likely first-round pick.

Accuracy: Very good accuracy in the short passing game, puts ball on the numbers or in a place where receiver can make a play after the catch, even when throwing off his back foot. Quite accurate making plays on the run, squares his shoulders throwing in either direction, has deft touch but also puts some zip on shorter to intermediate throws and places the ball to the outside. Hits open receivers in stride downfield. Generally throws a nice fade to the outside, will underthrow when trying to put too much air under the pass. Makes intermediate throws to the short side of the field, but too often sails throws over the middle or to the sideline from the pocket. Arm

Strength:
  Possesses an NFL arm. Gets the ball from one hash to the opposite sideline in a hurry. Has the zip to hit tight windows on short and intermediate throws. Tight spiral aids velocity. Flips the ball 20-30 yards downfield on the run.

Setup/Release:
Inconsistent release, at times flipping the ball out quickly like Philip Rivers and winding up on other throws. Height and tall, balanced posture in pocket makes it easy to survey the field. Splits time between shotgun and coming out from under center. Takes extra steps in his drop at times. Feels interior pressure too quickly, throws off back foot when unnecessary (though it's still accurate). Pats ball to keep rhythm. Delivery gets a bit sidearm, allows linemen to knock down throws. Not practiced stepping up into the pocket to find room to throw.

Reading Defenses:
Sees the field very well when the play breaks down and occasionally changes plays at the line, but needs work recognizing coverages. Will throw his man into a defender, resulting in big hits. Also needs to be cognizant of blitzes and outside pressure, puts himself (and the ball) in danger too often by failing to see late comers and secondary rush. Sells play fake and is patient enough to look to one side of the field before going to primary option on misdirection plays. Stares down receivers too often, NFL-caliber defenders close on his passes to create turnovers.

On the Move: Excellent mobility for his size, not surprising given his success at receiver. Regularly used on bootlegs (with good urgency on play fake) to either side of the formation take advantage of his athleticism. Presses the line running to his left, puts himself into the arms of defenders. Good touch on underneath throws when plays break down. Won't get the corner as easily against NFL defenders, but has the quickness to get chunks of yardage on naked bootlegs and when lanes open in man coverage. Watches the pressure and flushes a bit early, but once in the open he looks for downfield targets. Tough player, but takes too many hits downfield on zone-read plays and scrambles, must learn to slide. Height and slight build bring durability concerns.

Intangibles:
Intelligent prospect who is very good student, a regular on first-team Academic All-Big 12 squad who hopes to one day become an orthopedic surgeon. Team player who reveled in the chance to compete on the field at receiver instead of transferring once losing the quarterback battle. Father played quarterback at Texas Tech. Occasional pooch punter.

Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 12:59 am by Papa Voo

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Browns are retards. Kalil was going to the Vikes the entire time.
Dolphins take Tannehill!:D

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With the 9th Overall pick, the Panthers take...




Luke Kuechly, ILB
School: Boston College




Read & React: Intelligent player who knows his keys and "feels" his way to the ball. Aggressiveness allows him to be fooled by those keys, like pulling guards, on misdirection and takes a false step forward on play action, but also recovers well and regularly sniffs out reverses and other trick plays to prevent big gains.

Run defense: Constantly around the ball, fights traffic easily and steps into gaps instead of waiting for the ballcarriers. Tracks the ball to either sideline but needs perfect angles to beat NFL tailbacks to perimeter. Anchors and can stick bigger backs with lowered pads. Doesn't have elite size to stand up to NFL-caliber linemen, but regularly rips off blocks with strong hands and can makeplays even if initially knocked backward.

Pass defense: Not an elite athlete. Covers some ground in pass coverage and gets good depth in his drop, taking correct angles to stay with tight ends and bigger slot receivers down the middle. Takes time to reach running backs going into the flat. Reliable tackler in the middle zone to prevent yards after the catch on crossing routes.

Tackling:
Secure tackler by not a feared one -- plays strong and finds a way to bring down ballcarriers. Drops his hips, keeps his head up to drag down ballcarriers. Makes running backs pay for going out of bounds with a strong shoulder. Occasionally tries to tackle high, allowing the ballcarrier to elude. Relies on hustle and angles, not straight-line speed, to make plays outside the box. Pass Rush/Blitz: Didn't blitz often and lacks great closing speed to reach the quarterback from the stack. Sure open-field tackler who doesn't miss many once he's in the backfield with excellent tackling technique.

Intangibles:
Exceptional on-field hustle and instincts and off-field work ethic. Gained good weight and muscle since arriving at BC. Should garner top general and football character and intelligence grades. Serves as back-up long snapper.

Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 01:04 am by Papa Voo

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With the 10th Pick, the Bills select...





Stephon Gilmore, CB
School: South Carolina




Man Coverage: Plays mostly in press-bail or off-coverage. Flashes a tough, aggressive punch after the snap in rare press coverage occasions, but may not have the strength to knock NFL receivers off their routes. Not elite transitioning forward from backpedal, will take an extra step or loop a bit when closing on slants. Lacks elite recovery and straight-line speed to stay with faster wideouts down the field if beaten on a double move or losing a step off the line.

Zone Coverage: Fits best in a zone system like he currently plays. Knows his, and others', assignments on every play. Comes out initial read quickly to stop the underneath route dead. Quick feet in off coverage to adjust to inside routes,even when playing outside technique. Explodes to plays in front of him, cutting down his target or wrapping up if able to line up the receiver. Forces turnovers and dropped passes with his ability to arrive strong at the receiver with the ball.

Ball Skills: Makes quarterbacks pay for poor throws with centerfielder-like instincts and hands. Uses his height in full advantage on jump balls, make difficult catches with his hands extended away from his frame. Excellent elusiveness after the catch that shows as a punt returner. Has solid hands and typically makes the right decision to fair catch, but does not have breakaway speed and will dance or move east-west instead of heading straight upfield.

Run Support:
Takes run support very seriously, seeking out contact. Chops down runs to his side when able, evades most receivers blocks with quickness and quick hands -- though NFL receivers will have regular success holding him up on the outside because of his slight build. Tackling: Aggressive hitter in the secondary who plays without regard to his own safety. Best when coming downhill and cutting down ballcarriers with a low shoulder. Constantly looking to strip the football from ballcarriers while other defenders are making the tackle. Man-up tackling is a challenge for him, however, when facing a strong runner who lowers his pads or larger receivers with the length to stiff-arm him. Plays on coverage units. Brought on edge blitzes regularly when front four isn't getting there, uses quickness and big hits to create turnovers from the blind side.

Intangibles: Left after junior season with 40 career starts. Quiet, hard-working player who consistently gets praise from coaches and teammates for his work ethic and attitude. Puts in time in the film room, knows his opponents and defensive scheme inside and out. No worries about on-field effort, brings tenacious attitude on every play.


Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 01:10 am by Papa Voo

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With the 11th selection, the Chiefs pick...




Dontari Poe, DT
School: Memphis 




Poe ran and jumped like a little man at the Combine, but showed the strength of the big guy that he is. He had 44 reps with 225 pounds and ran 40 yards in an unofficial time of 4.98 seconds, which would be acceptable for a linebacker or tight end 100 pounds lighter. Poe is obviously naturally gifted with size and strength, although some scouts are concerned that he doesn't always play up to his ability. "Dontari is a powerful, powerful young man who has the potential to be the best defensive lineman I ever coached," offered Memphis defensive line coach Mike DuBose, who saw some pretty good DLs in his days as head coach at Alabama, where he wonan SEC championship in 1999. DuBose says Poe often over-thinks what he is doing rather than just doing it and needs to just rely on his abilities more. That probably accounts for the reason Poe doesn't always explode off the line. But DuBose says Poe is a dedicated athlete in the weight room and on the field, where he will still need to refine some techniques to maximize his God-given abilities at the next level.

Pass rush: Flashes exciting burst off the snap to penetrate. Can slip through gaps with his get-off and is an intimidating force for quarterbacks to avoid. Shows some natural balance and lateral agility to break down and chase the quarterback but has only phone booth quickness overall and is quickly left behind by mobile/alert passers. Shows a rip and swim move, but neither is particularly effective. Relies often on a simple bull rush but it is only marginally productive due to the fact that Poe routinely stands up at contact, losing leverage and negating his own strength. Does not possess an adequate secondary move if his initial burst is contained. Too often struggles to disengage with blockers smaller and weakerthan him. Needs to do a better job of using his height to his advantage and present to the quarterback obstacles to throw around. Has only four passes defensed in his career, though to his credit three of them came in 2011.

Run defense:
Shows the burst to split gaps and make the play on his own. Also has the ability to create a pile in the middle, even showing the ability to split the occasional double-team. However, is just as often blown off the ball due to his high pad level. Needs to do a better job of being the aggressor and tossing blockers aside to make the play rather than falling off blocks onto ballcarriers as they go by. Flashes good lateral agility to side-step blockers and can surprise you with his speed and effort in lateral pursuit. May struggle as a nose guard in the NFL due to shorter than ideal arms (31 5/8), especially considering his height. Good strength and balance to sit down, lock-out and create a pile, however, leading to possibilities inside and out (in the 3-4). Explosion: Has an explosive burst off the line. Consistently among the first linemen moving at the snap. Generates power through his hips and can rock the offensive lineman back onto his heels with his initial surge. Gathers momentum quickly and can explode into the ballcarrier, showing the ability to separate the football (four forced fumbles over his career).

Strength:
Possesses excellent weight-room strength, although it doesn't always translate onto his play due to his short arms and high pad level. Can wow you with his ability to push the pocket and drag down ballcarriers with just one arm but doesn't play with power consistently enough for a man with his talents. Tackling: Surprisingly light on his feet and shows the ability to break down reasonably well to make the tackle in tight quarters against much smaller, quicker ballcarriers. Can knock ballcarriers to the ground with a good shove and latch-on, drag-down tackles while engaged, but also shows the ability to wrap securely, as well as enough explosiveness to force fumbles.

Intangibles:
Given a second-round grade by the NFL Advisory Committee. Voted Team MVP and Defensive Player of the Year by his teammates. If Poe had returned for his senior season he would have been playing for his third head coach in four years.


Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 01:11 am by Papa Voo

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With the 12th Pick of the 2012 Draft, the Philadelphia Eagles take...




Fletcher Cox, DT
School
: Mississippi State 


Cox is naturally big, plays bigger and is expected grow even more in size and ability. A third-year junior, Cox was the only player from Mississippi State to be named to All-SEC first team after he collected 56 tackles and five sacks last season. He works hard from kickoff until the final whistle, setting a pace for teammates and wearing down opponents. He showed very good explosion in Combine testing. The light-footed Cox played both defense end and defensive tackle and his versatility will be an asset in the NFL, where scouts think he is similar to San Diego's Corey Luiget, an 18th overall pick out of Illinois last year. Cox was one of five Bulldogs suspended for the 2011 season opener against Memphis for breaking team rules, but he returned to the field with a vengeance and earned praise from his coaches.


Pass rush: Good quickness off the snap. Attacks gaps, getting skinny to slip past interior linemen when lining up as a defensive tackle. Enough speed to challenge the shoulders of strong-side tackles when lining up as a defensive end. Does not possess the explosiveness and flexibility to turn the corner efficiently, however, limiting his pass rush potential on the outside. Developing pass rush technique, including a swim move, but does not use this often enough. Relies almost exclusively on his bull rush. Generates an explosive pop to knock his opponent back onto his heels. Possesses the lateral agility to take advantage of the unbalanced offensive lineman to run around him and collapse the pocket.

Run defense: Good size and power,though Cox struggles with leverage, at times. Can be blown off the ball when double-teamed as he currently lacks prototypical width and thickness in his lower body for an interior defender. Cox does appear to have the frame to add an additional 10-15 pounds. Good upper-body strength and quick hands to disengage from the one-on-one block. Penetrates gaps and locates the football quickly. Slides off of blocks to latch onto ballcarriers as they attempt to run by. Alert defender who recognizes the trap block and possesses enough quickness to beat his opponent to the spot. Lacks the sustained speed to chase down ballcarriers, but puts good effort into his lateral pursuit. Explosion: Varies his burst off the snap, but does not possess true explosiveness in his get-off. Among his best assets, however, is his strong upper body. Attacks blockers with an explosive pop, which allows him to disengage quickly.

Strength: Naturally strong man who is still learning to use his power to his advantage. Good to very good upper-body strength and leg drive to push his opponent deep into the pocket. Good strength as a drag-down tackler, as well. Does negate his own strength, on occasion, due to a high pad level. Tackling: High effort player who locates the football and pursues laterally and downfield. An effective drag-down tackler due to his upper-body strength. Surprisingly light on his feet showing an ability to adjust to elusive ballcarriers in close quarters. Closes quickly and wraps up well, but isn't an explosive hitter likely to knock the ball free. Has forced just two fumbles in three seasons of action.

Intangibles:
Naturally large man with plenty of room for additional growth. Appears to be just scratching the surface of his physical potential, though he has three years of starting experience in the SEC. Blocked four kicks from 2009-11. Was suspended for the 2011 season-opener (Memphis), along with four other Bulldogs, for an undisclosed violation of team rules.


Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 01:14 am by Papa Voo

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Okay, Eagles fans....Good pick?  Bad pick?  Indifferent? 

I do no think it is that bad of a pick.  I think the Rams would have scooped him up if the Iggles didn't. 

What are the Rams doing?

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Arizona Cards have the 13th Pick and select....






Michael Floyd, WR
School: Notre Dame


Floyd's size and prolific on-field performances are tantalizing for NFL teams. He arrived at Notre Dame as one of the most celebrated prep recruits in the nation and validated that with 48 catches for 719 yards as a true freshman. He finished his career with seven school records, including most receptions (271), most yards receiving (3,686) and touchdown catches (37). He also reaffirmed his on-field feats with measureable athleticism at the Scouting Combine, running 40 yards in 4.47 seconds and leaping 36 1/2 inches in the vertical jump. But there were bad statistics off the field. He was cited for underage consumption of alcohol twice and driving under the influence once and finally was suspended from the team last spring.Although he was allowed back on the team, he lost his role as captain. Despite all that, and a broken clavicle in 2009, Floyd was undoubtedly one of the top receivers in college football the last four seasons. He is an intriguing combination of good quickness, better speed, great size and awesome hands that engulf the football. His size and strength should help him against NFL press coverage and his long arms (32 7/8 inches) will be an asset going for the ball. Floyd certainly has the physical ability to star in the NFL if he works hard enough at it on and off the field.


Release: Does not explode off the line of scrimmage and runs with long strides. His size and strength make him tough to press, however, and he is capable of separating with physicality -- but not pure speed.

Hands: Has strong hands, but scouts have questions about his consistency as a receiver. Excellent vertical and ability to adjust to high throws, and also snatches wide throws near the sideline or over the middle. Tracks the ball well over his shoulder (or head), though he will lose sideline awareness in some cases. Too often lets the ball get into his body.

Route running: Needs to tighten up his routes, but has the quick feet and balance to cut or come back to the ball.  Should excel in a West Coast or timing-type of offense. Lined up at every receiver position to take advantage of the best matchup. Solid threat on slants, shallow crosses and in the red zone.

After the catch: More of a bull than a cheetah. Will not outrun NFL defensive backs, but has more than enough speed to turn short passes into long gains when his quarterback leads him. Can make a quick inside move on an out route to get additional yardage, but won't outrun NFL defenders from a standstill. Looks best when plowing over corners one-on-one in space or carrying multiple defenders down the middle.

Blocking: Has the size to handle defensive backs, but needs to be more consistent here to give backs a chance to break off big runs. When ready to go on screens and run plays to his side, he is capable of a strong punch and sustaining the block. Often misses his target or fails to sustain by not giving full effort if the play is designed to go away from him.

Intangibles:
Arrested three times on alcohol-related charges while at Notre Dame. Missed most of 2009 with a broken left collarbone and the final two regular-season contests of 2008 with a left knee injury.



Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 01:21 am by Papa Voo

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The Cards seem to have alot more pressing needs than another WR.

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The St. Louis Rams take the 14th Pick and select.....






Michael Brockers, DT
School: LSU



Brockers signed on with LSU as a 250-pound freshman defensive end in 2009 and in just three seasons with the program grew into a 300 pound monster in the middle whose impact on defense rivaled that of Morris Claiborne and even Tyrann Mathieu. In retaining his cat-quick agility despite adding strength and mass, Brockers boasts an athletic skill-set that no other defensive tackle in the 2012 draft can match. Brockers redshirted in 2009 and flashed a great deal of potential a year later, seeing action in 13 games and starting against Alabama. He registered four tackles against the Tide and had 25 for the season, including one for loss against North Carolina. He also forced a fumble against Lousiana-Monroe thathis teammate Lavar Edwards returned for a touchdown. Nothing in 2010, however, foreshadowed the season Brockers would have as a redshirt sophomore. Brockers started off his 2011 campaign with a bang by tying his career high with five tackles in a highly anticipated season opening matchup against the Oregon Ducks. Brockers seemed to play at his best in big games, recording four tackles (including three for loss) and a sack against Mississippi State, three tackles and a tackle for loss against Florida, five tackles against Arkansas, six tackles in the SEC Championship Game against Georgia, including two for loss, as well as a forced fumble and a pass broken up. Finally, Brockers recorded a combined 11 tackles in his two games versus Alabama, including a career-high seven stops in the BCS Championship game. Brockers also recorded a tackle for loss and blocked an Alabama field goal in the early second quarter that kept the Crimson Tide's lead at just 3-0. For the year he recorded 54 tackles, including 10 tackles for loss and two sacks. He was named to the Second Team All-SEC squad. All of the usual caveats apply with grading this redshirt sophomore as a potential first round pick. He only has one season of dominant play, was surrounded by a great deal of talent and experienced his success on a defense that helped Glenn Dorsey and Tyson Jackson earn top five grades that frankly neither has played up to at this point. Brockers' unmatched combination of size, athleticism, strength and youth is tantalizing, however. He played with great passion and the awareness of a four-year not one-year starter in 2011. Capable of starring as a three-technique defensive tackle or holding the point as a five technique defensive end, Brockers will be highly valued by 4-3 and 3-4 teams, alike. If he plays with the same passion in the NFL that he did for the Tigers in 2011, he'll prove to be a standout regardless of the scheme he's placed into.


Pass rush: Only registered two sacks in 2011 but appears to have blossoming natural pass rush skills. Good initial quickness off the snap and flashes an explosive burst to split gaps. Surprising use of leverage for a player of his height. Good arm length and strength to keep his opponents' hands off his chest. Good bull rusher due to his use of leverage and good leg drive. Good quick arm-over swim move, which is made especially effective due to his long arms. Stymied at the line of scrimmage by chop blocks early in the season (Oregon) but improved his awareness and balance as the year went on. Good lateral agility and an explosive burst to close when the quarterback is near. Good awareness to get his hands in the air. Knocked down three passes in 2011 including making a diving interception against Northwestern State.

Run defense: Again, shows surprising bend and power to win the leverage battle despite his height. Used as part of a rotation and loses his effectiveness when his pad level rises as he tires. Good upper body strength to stack and shed. Lacks the anchor to hold up to double teams, but shows good quickness and aggression to seize the gap and works hard to split it. Pursues well when he has a lane to do so. Can get tied up inside and lose track of the ball. Good effort. Gets up quickly when knocked to the ground and gives his all to the whistle.

Explosion:
Flashes enough quickness off the snap to threaten gaps at three-technique, especially when slanting. Heavy hands, good lower body strength and the ability to roll his hips into his opponent to drive them backwards on the bull rush. Arrives with a thud as a tackler. Strength: Still growing but shows very good strength to hold up as an interior run defender when he maintains his proper pad level. Long, strong arms for the take-down tackle despite being engaged with a blocker.

Tackling: A forceful hiter who brings his hips to explode into the ball-carrier. "Only" forced one fumble in 2011 but did the same in 2010 despite considerably less playing time. Appears to have the athleticism and closing speed to improve in this area with more experience. Generally a good wrap-up tackler who brings ball-carriers to the ground quickly and securely. Good effort laterally and downfield in pursuit.

Intangibles: Given a late first to early second round grade by the NFL Advisory Committee. Lined up as a three technique, on the nose (zero technique) and outside at defensive end (five technique) for LSU in 2011. Has had no known off-field or injury issues while at LSU. Though Brockers' 2011 season seemingly came out of nowhere, head coach Les Miles predicted it heading into the 2010 season characterizing Brockers as "becoming a bear to handle inside."

Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 01:30 am by Papa Voo

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The Seahawks with the 15th Pick select.....





Bruce Irvin, OLB
School: West Virginia



After being academically ineligible to play high school football and serving a stint in juvenile jail, Irvin completed his GED in December 2007 and got a chance at Mt. San Antonio Junior College for the 2009 season. Irvin was late arriving to campus, so the team played him as an undersized defensive end. He garnered first-team All-America status (72 tackles, 21 for loss, and 16 sacks) in that role. The Mountaineers also charged him which chasing the passer, which led to a second-team All-Big East campaign in 2010 (14 sacks, ranked second in the nation) and first-team selection in 2011. Despite his lack of experience, Irvin's athleticism and toughness should give him a chance to be a pass rusher as a 3-4 linebacker at the next level, or possibly a defensive end for the handful of NFL 4-3 teams not minding his lack of size. If he answers questions about his past to NFL scouts' satisfaction, they may decide to take a chance on his potential in either role with an early-round selection.

Read and react: Has natural instincts for defense despite his lack of experience, though he is obviously still learning. Finds the ball regularly and has the change of direction ability to get to it.

Run defense: Gives some effort to chase down running backs. Miscast as a hand-down player and played mostly in passing situations, but has some fair strength for his size and does not break down easily against the run. At linebacker, he should have no problems getting off tight end blocks to contain against the run.

Pass defense: Limited experience dropping into coverage, as he was primarily used as a pass rush specialist. Has change-of-direction skills and hustle to track down ball carriers in the open field, but will need to learn how to handle coverage responsibilities. Tackling: Strong wrap tackler who can dislodge the ball with power and goes for the strip if his target is holding the ball low or loose. Brings down quarterbacks much bigger than he is. Very good motor and regularly chases down plays from behind. Used on special-teams coverage units because of his tenacity and speed.

Pass Rush/Blitz:
Best attribute. Extreme quickness off the edge, has flexibility to turn the corner. Shows toughness to get under the pads of tackles to bull them, club them upfield to get the inside lane, or fight through blocks for secondary rush when passer steps up. Keeps feet moving after initial contact. Jumps inside as a counter to typical rush, but needs to show a larger variety of moves. Gets pressures on inside stunts and was too explosive for college guards to handle.

Intangibles: Tough player who gets up from being planted and comes hard on the next play. Comes from rough background and almost threw away his talent but earned GED, walked onto junior-college team and continues to work hard towards his goal of playing in the NFL.



Reach?????

Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 01:37 am by Papa Voo

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Voo-only time will tell. The experts are way wrong every year.

Jets reach for Coples, who seems to have "notgiveashititis".

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The J-E-T-S use the 16th overall pick on....




Quinton Coples, DE

School: North Carolina 



If size, strength and 33-inch arms can somehow be a blessing and a curse for a defensive lineman, then Coples fits the bill. He racked up 17.5 sacks the past two seasons while seeing time at end and tackle, yet arrived at the Scouting Combine dogged by questions about his inconsistency and a perception that his motor doesn't run at 100 percent on every play. "You know, I'm a big guy. I'm a long-strider, things of that nature, so where it may come fast to me in a game, on film it's slowing down a little bit," Coples said. "People have their own opinions. Some people don't even think it was a problem. So it's different opinions and you just go forwhat it is." The North Carolina coaching staff asked Coples to slide inside to tackle in the middle of 2011, a move he originally resisted. But the 30 pounds he has added since joining the Tar Heels program showed as he finished with 59 tackles, 15.5 tackles for loss and 10 sacks. The move allowed him to show off his versatility, but also created some question as to where Coples will fit best in NFL schemes. Despite his success inside last year, Coples' height, long arms and burst off the snap could make him a real force off the edge. "I take pride in being versatile," he said. "It definitely has raised my stock in that it lets teams know that I can inside or out. "I'm definitely prepared for whatever defensive scheme that a team has." Wherever teams project Coples, he is the most physically gifted defensive lineman in this draft - rated the top defensive endl prospect by NFLDraftScout.com - and enjoyed a strong week at the Senior Bowl. "I heard the rumors and all the things that were going on about me not playing as hard, so I took it personally," Coples said of his Senior Bowl experience. "And I made a statement for myself that I can compete outside of the ACC and all across the country." It's not Coples' physical skills that are holding him back from an even higher draft grade. The questions about his propensity to disappear from the stat sheet for stretches at a time wasn't helped by the perception that he resisted the move back to tackle last season for fear that it would hurt his draft stock. "A lot of people have a lot of high expectations for me, and I appreciate that," Coples said. "But when you're playing the game of football, you have things that happen that don't go as planned. I think it was a situation that happened that I learned from, I matured from, and I think I'll reap the benefits at the next level." Coples said he's his own harshest critic, so he can handle the negative things said about him. And he claims to be ready to take on the duties of starring in the NFL. "To be a professional and to be great you have to work hard all the time," he said. "And do those small things that I did, but didn't master like I think I should."

Pass rush: Good burst off the snap, but his speed and flexibility to dip and rip around the edge as a traditional right defensive end isn't certain. Powerful. Has an excellent bull rush and uses his long arms to keep offensive linemen away from his body to dictate the action. Doesn't possess elite lateral agility or closing speed, but gains ground quickly because of his length. Is a strong drag-down tackler capable of pulling down the quarterback while still engaged with a blocker. Uses his hands well. Features a strong rip move, good swim and anticipation of the cut block, showing the quick hands, feet and balance to sprawl. Alert defender who will get his hands up to cloud passing lanes.

Run defense:
Lacks the bulk teams are looking for in a three-down defensive tackle. Comes off the snap high but has excellent strength to quickly stand up his opponent. Good hand placement and upper-body strength to stack and shed blocks. Can swim inside, get skinny and beat doubles. Has enough lateral agility and length that running backs can't escape when he's near. Funnels action to teammates. Good lateral agility and balance to play the keys and pursue laterally.

Explosion: Explosive strength to rock the offensive lineman back onto his heels. Can generate ferocious hits when he gets some momentum. Strength: Among his best assets. Can easily bull rush most offensive linemen and plow them backward into the pocket. Struggles with leverage when playing defensive tackle and can get pushed off the ball early in the play, but ultimately recovers because of his strength. Tackling: Good drag-down tackler. Can latch on to ballcarriers with just one arm and slow them enough for teammates to clean up the trash. Long arms allow him to "catch" opponents and wrestle them to the ground. Lowers his head too often when making contact. Good effort in lateral pursuit. Will leave his feet and lunge at the ballcarrier, showing the explosiveness to knock his opponent down without wrapping up. Few ballcarriers are able to escape his grasp, long arms and strength.

Intangibles: Investigated by the NCAA for attending draft-day parties with former teammates Marvin Austin and Robert Quinn, but was ultimately cleared of any wrongdoing. Added 30 pounds since signing with North Carolina. Immaturity and selfishness apparent when asked to move back inside to defensive tackle in the middle of his senior season; he refused for fear it would hurt his draft stock. NFL Comparison: Julius Peppers, Bears


Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 01:41 am by Papa Voo

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With the 17th overall pick, the Bungels select....





Dre Kirkpatrick, CB
School: Alabama


There was never a doubt that the ever-confident Kirkpatrick could talk the talk, a natural ability he was not bashful about displaying on and off the field since high school. But what makes him special -- albeit even more irritating to opponents -- is Kirkpatrick can back it up with his play. Only question is, will he? There are plenty of game tapes that show Kirkpatrick has all the athletic ability, instincts and tenacity to be a great cornerback. Scouts need to watch the tapes because statistics don't tell Kirkpatrick's story. In three seasons he had only three interceptions -- all in 2010 -- but his strength is in how he plays the man more than how he plays the ball. Hedenies receivers. He denies them a clean release. He denies them to get separation. And he denies them an opportunity to get the ball. He is physical to the extreme, both in coverage and coming up on run support, where he is perhaps too much of a hitter and not enough of a wrap-up tackler. "We play a lot of man and zone and off coverage," Kirkpatrick said of Alabama's scheme. "The main thing we really play is man and bump and run but my zone skills I'm happy where I'm at with them." However, some scouts are concerned about reports that Alabama coach Nick Saban worked to keep Kirkpatrick motivated and there was an arrest, and a dropped charge, involving possession of marijuana only days after Kirkpatrick declared for the 2011 draft. As usual, Kirkpatrick had the last word, via twitter: "For those who doubted: NO CHARGES FILED against me for the marijuana bust in Florida." "It was me being in the wrong place at the wrong time," Kirkpatrick said at the Scouting Combine. "The guy that left the marijuana in the car turned himself in and didn't want to put me in a bad situation. He signed an affidavit saying that I was unaware of the marijuana being in the car and I was unaware of it."

Man Coverage: Possesses prototypical size and strength combination to lock down NFL receivers on the outside. Long arms and attitude give him a chance to be very good in press role. Plays with natural bend and fair foot quickness in his backpedal. Hips are fluid for his size, opens them up quickly out of pedal to keep inside position while running down the sideline. Recovery speed from double-moves and pick plays is more than adequate, does not give much ground trailing on crossing routes. Can be overaggressive landing his punch in press, giving up inside position, losing his balance, or even falling down.

Zone Coverage:
Mainly used in man, but flashes playmaking ability in zones, as well. Uses his size and length to close and wrap effectively after the catch. Reads quarterback when playing off, baits him to make the underneath throw then closes to make the interception or a big hit to dislodge ball from receiver. Uses length to knock away touch passes behind him and in front of the safety.

Ball Skills:
Strong enough to win jump balls down the sideline or 50-50 balls over the middle. Good hand-eye coordination to knock away passes in front of receivers with off hand. Does not find the ball quickly when receiver turns to look, overruns plays too regularly. Gambles on interceptions instead of securing the tackle.

Run Support: Very physical outside, pushes aside smaller wideouts easily and does not back down from confrontations with larger players. Willing to add himself to piles. Good hustle and chase downfield to help teammates. Typically keeps outside leverage but will get aggressive, leaving the sideline vulnerable. Needs to consistently break down and keep his feet outside or NFL backs will evade him.

Tackling: Flashes pure strength to stop receivers and running backs in their tracks on the outside, should get stronger over time. Likes to throw his shoulder into receivers to force them out of bounds. Resorts to duck-and-swipe when unnecessary, which may work against college ballcarriers but will cause problems at the next level. Used on corner blitzes due to size/speed combination, forces a lot of quick throws. Willing to go for the strip, especially if ballcarrier already engaged. Negates special teams gunners on punts, stays with them with effort, physicality and speed.

Intangibles:
Well-liked teammate who got the nickname "Swag" for his quiet but confident demeanor; referred to Texas as not having "swagger" during his college announcement press conference. Likes to talk on the field to teammates and get the crowd involved when at home. Praised for his strong will and work ethic. Won the team's Bart Starr Most Improved Player Award in the spring of 2011.



Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 01:48 am by Papa Voo

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If anybody else is watching the draft, are you getting annoyed at the crowd doing the Steve Austin "What?"

It got even worse when they showed the pudgy guy with the Jets jersey giggling after yelling "What?" 



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The Chargers have the selection for the 18th pick....




Melvin Ingram, OLB
School: South Carolina



Melvin Ingram might want to send a personal thank you note to Giants general manager Jerry Reese for the slew of teams who are spending extra hours breaking down his game film. It only takes one to see his upside and draft him significantly higher than he might have gone just a few years ago. The Giants have gained admirers around the NFL for their ability to stockpile versatile pass rushers and race after quarterbacks on passing downs. Pun intended, they call it their "NASCAR" package when All-Pro defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul slides inside to get Osi Umenyiora on the field. Linebacker Mathias Kiwanuka is another quarterback hunter who sees time up front as a pass rusher. In a copycat league, the Giants have also drawn a blueprint for teams to look hard at athletes who can flat-out get after the passer. Get them in camp and figure out where to play them later. Ingram fits that mold - a versatile athlete who can lineup outside either tackle, move to tackle on third down and rush the passer standing up inside or off the edge. And coming off a strong senior season in which he led the Gamecocks with 13.5 tackles for loss and 8.5 sacks, he's one of the most coveted pass rushers in this draft. His combination of strength, leverage and speed has scouts for 3-4 teams also taking a close look at Ingram as a potential edge rushing linebacker. Picking up coverage technique is always the biggest challenge for ends making the transition, but Ingram was recruited as a linebacker, didn't move to end until his sophomore year and still saw time there in certain packages. He had a pair of interceptions last season and was part of South Carolina's "hands team" on kickoffs. "I've been working at linebacker and defensive end the whole time I've been training," said Ingram, who called playing linebacker "second nature to me. "It really don't matter (where I play). As long as I'm on the football field." Ingram met with 3-4 and 4-3 base teams at the Scouting Combine, and said his biggest assets are simply his athletic ability and relentless desire to be around the ball. And to those who are concerned about his lone season as a true standout in college? "Just coming in, being in a situation where there was somebody else better than me. I had to play my role on the team," said Ingram. "I did whatever the team needed me to do. At that point and time it wasn't for me to be a starter."


Pass rush: Flashes the closing speed, hustle, and quick hands to beat tackles on the edge. Also fakes outside rush, cuts to inside lane with hands and quickness for direct path. Lines up inside in passing situations, uses quickness to get under pads of guards. Spins off blocks to reach quarterbacks stepping up into the pocket or trying to run. Runs through tight ends with leverage and strength. Gets most sacks on secondary rushes, lacks elite quickness to win initial battle against better linemen. Occasionally displays flexibility to turn the corner. Flashes good agility and change of direction when staying in front of ballcarriers in space and dropping into zone coverage. Must prove he can stay with running backs in the flat when at linebacker.

Run defense:
Uses low center of gravity and thick upper body to play with leverage against the run game. Holds his ground well whether lined up with his hand down or standing up. Can split double team to penetrate and make the tackle. Often spins off to reach ballcarriers running to either side instead of shock-and-shed on the edge. Most tight ends will not handle him one-on-one.

Explosion:
Very inconsistent coming off the snap as a pass rusher, sometimes pressing his man up the field but often being among the last to move. Provides some pop into blockers, jolting and getting under taller tackles' pads to push them backwards.

Strength: Possesses the upper-body strength to play man-up with NFL linemen with his hand on the ground or standing up. Handles most college tight ends on the edge. Flashes hands strong enough to rip off blocks to attack ballcarriers, but must be more consistent to become a true playmaker at the next level. Does not maintain his anchor if turned by better tackles in the hole.

Tackling: Relies on his strength, arm length, and strong hits to stop SEC running backs and quarterbacks in their tracks. Flashes good change of direction ability in space to corral ballcarriers. Leaves his feet and lowers his shoulder too often, though, must wrap to consistently bring down NFL ballcarriers.

Intangibles:
Has not yet been a starter at the collegiate level. No known character or work ethic problems. One of five players involved in campus fracas with non-football players in September 2008, no one was charged. Redshirted 2008 season after breaking his foot in an off-the-field incident. Suffered a broken left hand early against Vanderbilt in 2010 but returned to the contest and did not miss any games.


Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 01:56 am by Papa Voo

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Papa Voo wrote: Dallas trade with St. Louis to move up to the 6th position.  Dallas selects....



Morris Claiborne, CB School: LSU


Claiborne arrived at LSU expecting to play wide receiver, but was moved to corner as a freshman at the insistence of teammate Patrick Peterson. In 2010, Claiborne started opposite Peterson (No. 5 overall selection in 2011 draft, Arizona Cardinals) in what will be remembered as one of the best cornerback tandems in college history. Peterson won the Jim Thorpe Award as the nation's top defensive back in 2010 and Claiborne won the award himself last season when he grabbed six of his 11 career interceptions. That popular term shutdown corner comes to mind watching Claiborne, who has in-your-face coverage instincts and is one of the best returners in this draft. A versatile athlete, "Mo" piled up 2,000 all-purpose yards and30 touchdowns at quarterback as senior at Shreveport's Fair Park High School, where he also played baseball, basketball and won the Louisiana State 4A, 110-meter championship (10.76 seconds). Little wonder he is dangerous with the ball, evidenced by a college career total of 274 yards after the theft, including an 89-yard touchdown. He also averaged 28.8 yards last year on kickoff returns, including a 99-yard touchdown. At the Scouting Combine his unofficial time in 40 yards was an acceptable 4.50, but his speed wasn't in question. Claiborne will need to add bulk to be competitive at the next level.

Man Coverage: Size, quick feet and reach allow him to be effective in press, press-bail and "off" coverage. Rarely loses a step off the line because of his length and subtle knack for maintaining contact on the move. Packs a solid punch when extending near the line to re-route receivers. Gives up significant weight and mass to top NFL receivers. Lazy and high in his backpedal on occasion, receivers lull him to sleep and get a step on him with a quick move.

Zone Coverage: Used primarily in man. Has the physical tools to handle zone and is not contact-shy. Doesn't give up many yards after the catch -- long arms to pull down receivers and intensity to stick his nose in the pile. Recovers well but overestimates his closing speed and angle in zone.

Ball Skills: Former receiver has the hands to make difficult catches and will jump routes. Comfortable with the ball, elusive and has good vision after the catch. Often plays the man and doesn't get his head around to find the ball. Run Support: Used on run blitzes on occasion with size and length as a tackler. Holds up his man, maintains outside leverage, and sheds to make the tackle if needed on most plays. Has to be aware of coverage call and avoid overpursuit, giving up the sideline.

Tackling: Arm length and tenacious attitude make him a solid, if not fearsome, tackler on the edge. Height and flexibility to attack the thigh of opponents instead of needing to cut or grab an ankle. Not afraid to throw a shoulder but will miss tackles if he doesn't wrap in the NFL. Intangibles: Stood up well to being targeted by teams in 2010 while playing across from Patrick Peterson. Still learning the position, but coaches and teammates consider him a great student.

This trade shocked me. Good trade by Dallas.

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Papa Voo wrote: If anybody else is watching the draft, are you getting annoyed at the crowd doing the Steve Austin "What?"

It got even worse when they showed the pudgy guy with the Jets jersey giggling after yelling "What?" 




Yes. Annoying and teh ghey.

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Bears got a pass rusher. Seems like a reach. We'll see.

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The Chicago Bears control the 19th pick and select..




Shea McClellin, OLB
School: Boise State


McClellin has been known for his versatility since his days as a three-sport sensation at Marsing (Idaho) High school. And before he was able to play any of those sports he got up before sunrise to feed the animals on the farm of the grandparents who raised him. He lettered in baseball, basketball and football, where as a senior he played running back and linebacker. He rushed for 1,893 yards and 22 touchdowns and added 126 tackles, six interceptions and seven touchdowns on defense. For that he had the unusual honor of being named Western Idaho Conference Offensive AND Defensive Player of the Year. At Boise State he continued to do whatever was asked and do it well, which was somewhere between defensive end and linebacker. And that's how he enters the NFL, as a hyperactive, efficient edge player who has great field awareness and is as tough as, well, a good old farm boy. He was listed as a defensive end at the Combine and weighed in with 12 more pounds of muscle than he had in college and ran an excellent 40-yard dash, unofficially in 4.62 seconds.

Strengths: Plays fast with very good football quickness and agile footwork. A high effort and energy rusher who plays with obvious passion and intensity -- relentless and tenacious motor. Fast in pursuit with good chase skills to track down the action. Good get-off momentum and anticipation -- instinctive defender who locates the ball quickly. Extremely active and plays with an aggressive playing nature and attitude -- self-starter and strong finisher. Country strong and very physical, welcoming contact. Fights and works hard to find a way to beat blockers -- disruptive with a nose for the ball. Versatile defensive player with experience at LB, DE and other hybrid front-seven positions. A creative pass rusher, using a variety of moves and techniques to create pressure. Tough and durable with a productive collegiate resume (33.0 tackles for loss and 20.5 sacks), starting the final 37 games of his career in Boise. Weaknesses: Not a quick-twitch player and lacks natural explosion -- not an elite athlete. Has only average functional size and strength, lacking the natural power and length to overwhelm blockers at the next level. Too energetic at times and often over pursues his target -- can be overaggressive and take himself out of the play. Lacks a natural position for the next level and won't be at his best if he's locked into one spot. NFL Comparison: Eric Norwood, Carolina Panthers





Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 02:03 am by Papa Voo

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clawmaster wrote: Bears got a pass rusher. Seems like a reach. We'll see.


Not too much of a reach, I think the Pats had their eyes on him.  I like the pick.

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clawmaster wrote: Papa Voo wrote: Dallas trade with St. Louis to move up to the 6th position.  Dallas selects....



Morris Claiborne, CB School: LSU



This trade shocked me. Good trade by Dallas.

Did I miss Jerry Jones hiring a real GM for the Cowboys ????

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The 20th overall pick goes to the Titans and they take....






Kendall Wright, WR
School: Baylor 


As a four-year starter, Wright logged evidence in 50 games that he could scorch college defenses with blink-quick moves and appeared ready to fit into a slot position in the NFL and become a nightmarish matchup for defenses. But in the what-have-you-proven-lately fraternity of NFL scouts, Wright appeared to lose a little luster when his 40-yard time at the Scouting Combine was announced as only 4.61 seconds. It seemed incongruous compared to game tapes. Some NFL sources told NFLDraftscout.com that Wright's best time at the combine was really 4.49 seconds so they had no concerns. But Wright was upset by the announced time and felt he had to prove something, so at his Pro Day in March he was timed between 4.41 and 4.46 seconds according to scouts in attendance. That sounds more like the player who holds a share of 10 Baylor career receiving records and set a single season mark last year with 108 catches for 1,663 yards, 14 touchdown receptions and nine games with more than 100 yards. His career total of 4,004 yards receiving is 1,300 yards more than anyone who preceded him. Wright is a tireless athlete who also played on the Baylor basketball team, squatted more than 550 pounds and reportedly has a vertical jump of 42 inches. He has the natural ability to be a returner but was not showcased there in college. At Pittsburgh High in Texas, Wright was a three=sport sensation as he played quarterback in football, averaged almost 25 points a game in basketball and won the state championship with a meet record triple-jump of 50-feet, 8 3/4 inches in 2008.

Release: An impressive athlete with very quick acceleration to reach his top speed quickly and stretch the field. Very good body control and smooth movements. Plays fast and explosive. Short and lacks an imposing frame. Smaller target and didn't see a lot of press coverage in the Big 12.

Hands:
A savvy, natural hands-catcher with reliable hands and very good focus. A natural plucker who snatches the ball out of the air and shows the concentration to make acrobatic catches look easy. Does a nice job locating and tracking deep passes and is a legitimate vertical threat. Will go up and attack the ball, catching the ball in stride and quickly getting downfield -- looks to score every time he touches the ball. Has smallish hands and will have some drops. Route running: Has a knack for getting open and is a quarterbacks' best fiend -- passers just need to toss the ball in his area and he'll come down with it. A versatile weapon, proving to be effective inside in the slot and outside on the perimeter. Makes plays at all levels of the field. Still improving as a route runner and needs to do a better job selling his path -- needs to sell slants and in-cuts better. After the catch: Has elite balance tight-roping the sideline and in-and-out of his breaks, showing excellent start/stop ability and burst -- slippery runner with elusive footwork. Has little-to-no wasted movements between the reception and burst up the field -- dangerous after the catch with solid build and toughness to break tackles. Has good body strength to squirm out of tackles with the coordination to maneuver his frame between defenders. Shifty and elusive in the open field with very good vision. Creative with the ball in his hands and shows impressive feel for where he is on the field and the defenders around him.

Blocking: Wright has good playing strength for his frame and takes pride in his blocking. Very physical and aggressive.

Intangibles: Fearless over the middle and does a lot of his damage between the hashmarks. Wants the ball more than anyone else on the field. Confident and tough, playing through several injuries over his career. There is a lot to love about his effort and drive -- a top competitor who gives full effort on every snap. A fiery leader who plays with football intensity and determination -- type of player who will run through a wall for his team. Smart and shows elite feel and focus for the position. Has very good starting experience (42 starts), leading Baylor in receiving all four years of his college career. A versatile weapon (former high school quarterback) with 2 career passing touchdowns, 2 rushing scores and experience as a returner on special teams. Extremely productive over his college career, holding almost every school receiving record and finishing his time at Baylor with 302 catches, 4,004 yards (13.3), 30 receiving touchdowns and 19 career 100+ yd receiving performances -- had at least two catches in every game Baylor played the past four years (50 games). Has some durability concerns, battling through ankle, shoulder and knee injuries as a senior. Has received penalties in the past for excessive celebration and needs to keep his emotions under control. Played in a high-tempo, spread offense with the Heisman Trophy winner as his quarterback so his statistics might be inflated a tad. NFL Comparison: Steve Smith, Carolina Panthers


I thought this guy would go later.

Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 02:10 am by Papa Voo

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New England has the 21st pick and select....



Chandler Jones, DE
School: Syracuse


Offensive tackles who know Chandler Jones' background will have little interest in engaging in hand-to-hand combat. The defensive end from Syracuse does mixed martial arts training with his brother, who happens to be UFC superstar Jon "Bones" Jones. "Some flying knees, punching, elbowing, throwing everything I can," Chandler Jones told The Journal Sentinel about workouts with Jon. And if he wants to learn how to put those skills to good use on the field, he can turn to another brother, Art, who is a defensive tackle for the Baltimore Ravens. That football pedigree is certainly playing in Chandler Jones' favor as he attempts to work his way into the first round of this year's draft. "The way I was taught to play football, I was told there was a target I had to hit every snap," Jones told the paper. "Looking at the target out of snap, my hands were a lot more fast. I was on that target before I could even think about being that fast. My hands got lightning fast and I'm excited to see them get even better." Jones was a highly-touted recruit, and was a third-team All-Big East selection as a redshirt sophomore. He built on that with second team honors in 2010 and first team last season, despite missing five games with a knee injury. Having watched Art's draft stock plummet due to a knee injury before the 2010 draft, Chandler Jones opted to leave Syracuse with a year of eligibility remaining. He has just 10 sacks in 33 career games, but he is considered a good run defender, has good initial quickness and does a nice job of anticipating the snap count. As you'd expect from someone with martial arts training, Jones is a physical defender who competes through the whistle on every snap. He projects best as a left defensive end in the 4-3 alignment. With added size and strength he could also become a very solid defensive end in the 3-4 scheme. His size, strength and scheme versatility should result in a top 75 selection but his lack of elite pass rush traits limit how high he'll go. Despite lacking elite pass rushing skills, Jones' stock has been steadily rising during the pre-draft process.

Pass rush: Relies on hustle, vision and strength as a pass rusher. Times the snap well and has a good initial burst off the line. Lacks sustained speed around the corner, however, and will have a hard time beating NFL offensive tackles to the outside. Very long arms and an effective swim move, though he doesn't use this often enough. Good rip move. Good upper body strength and quick hands to knock away the blocker's attempts to control him. Good leg drive for the bull rush, though Jones struggles with pad level, at times. Very good vision and effort. Plays to the whistle.

Run defense: Good upper body strength and length to lock-out his opponent. Has at least moderate lateral agility to ride the block to the sideline and keep contain, though he's a bit stiff in changing directions and has only average speed, overall, for the position. Good vision to locate the football on the draw or QB scramble. Quick to break off his pass rush and pursue downfield. Recognizes the cut block but has only average balance overall to avoid it due to his high-cut frame.

Explosion: Possesses a quick burst off the line which is enhanced by his ability to time the snap count. Does not have the speed to turn the corner consistently. Good upper body strength to drive his opponent into the backfield on the bull rush but lacks true explosiveness to rock them back onto their heels. Is a wrap and drag down tackler more than an explosive hitter than ball-carriers need to fear. Strength: Flashes upper-body strength to rip past blockers and lower-body strength to stand up to double-teams, but will need to get stronger and play with more leverage to succeed at the next level. Controlled on the line too often by strong-handed blockers. Good strength for the pull-down tackle as the ball-carrier is rushing past him.

Tackling: Good hustle and chase tackler. Goes down the line and gets back to help teammates wrap up ballcarriers downfield, though his limited speed means he can be left in the dust quickly. Long arms and good strength for the drag-down tackle from behind, though he will leave his feet and lunge, on occasion. Is not a quick-twitch athlete who can change directions in small spaces and thus, can be eluded. Relies on his long arms to catch the ball-carrier rather than the agility to corral them.

Intangibles: Suffered a knee injury in the 2011 season opener against Wake Forest. The injury caused Jones to miss five games but was not publicly defined. Team doctors will certainly want to take a closer look at the Combine... Took on more of a leadership role in 2011, taking extra time to help coach up teammates from every defensive position on the team's scheme and expectations. Athletic bloodlines. Has two brothers -- Arthur, a former all-conference DT at Syracuse and currently with the Baltimore Ravens and Jon, who has been the UFC light-heavyweight champ.

Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 02:14 am by Papa Voo

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Mother Fucking Lions better not fuck this up.....


DECASTRO!!!!! YOU BETTER TAKE DECASTRO!!!!

Fuckers will probably take Janoris Jenkins.....

Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 02:17 am by stingmark

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The Browns use the 22nd pick to select....




Brandon Weeden, QB
School: Oklahoma State 



If being older than Aaron Rodgers is the biggest red flag NFL scouts can drum up for Brandon Weeden, the Oklahoma State quarterback is just fine with that. Weeden will turn 29 years old during his rookie NFL season, and has already experienced the ups and downs of being a professional athlete. Dealing with a torn labrum and tendinitis in his rotator cuff in 2006, he decided to pursue football rather than undergo major arm surgery. It would be four years before Weeden burst onto the college football landscape as a first-team All-Big 12 performer with 4,277 passing yards, 34 touchdowns and 13 interceptions in 2010 - playing much of the season with a ruptured tendon on his throwing thumb. He rewrote the Cowboys' record book as a senior, throwing for 4,727 yards and 37 touchdowns. Weeden was one of two players in the FBS to complete more than 400 passes and complete at least 72.4 percent of his passes while leading Oklahoma State to an 11-1 record and a victory over Andrew Luck and Stanford in the Fiesta Bowl. No one was concerned about Weeden's age while he was setting a school career record with 9,260 passing yards at Oklahoma State. But it comes up in nearly every conversation discussing his NFL prospects. "It used to kind of get under my skin, but there can be a lot worse things I can be answering questions about," said Weeden. "There's nothing else. That's really the only knock on me is my age. I have fun with it. "And here's the fact: I can't change it. I can change a lot of things, my footwork, throwing motion, release, this and this and this. I can't change my birth certificate. I wish I could pull a Danny Almonte, but I can't do it." In Weeden's corner is that he has already ridden the roller coaster of professional athletics. "In baseball, you guys know, it's a game of failure. I've failed, and I've had some success," he said. Weeden also faces the inevitable comparisons to Chris Weinke, who at 28 years old become the olden Heisman Trophy winner in history in 2000 for Florida State following a minor league baseball career. Weinke spent seven nondescript seasons in the NFL, but is now a noted quarterback guru. Weeden reached out to Weinke for advice during his pre-draft preparation. "I just kind of asked him what his approach was, how he went about it. And it was scary, he said the exact same things I've been saying. So it's consistent," said Weeden. "He opened up to let me pick his brain a little bit, because it's a unique situation. There's not many other guys that have been in this situation." Weeden pointed to a list of quarterbacks including Rich Gannon, Roger Staubach and Kurt Warner who didn't enjoy great NFL success until the second half of their careers. "Think of it, there's a lot of guys," he said. "You look back at my time at Oklahoma State, I didn't get hit. My body's extremely fresh. No injuries. I'm healthy. Everything's good. I think I've got a lot left in my tank. "Those guys played into their late 30s. A 10-year career in the NFL is a great career, and I think I've got every bit of that."


Positives: Sticks throws into tight windows over the middle, throwing to spot on slant or between zone defenders before receiver is open. Baseball pitcher background translates to NFL arm strength. Sprays the ball anywhere on the field, especially when given a pocket from which to deliver. Shows touch on fades and shorter throws and doesn?t overthrow passes to open receivers. Will step up into pocket while looking downfield, reset his feet and deliver. Tough player who takes a hit and bounces back up; played most of the 2010 season with a ruptured tendon in his right (throwing) thumb. Team leader on the practice and game fields.

Negatives:
Sails throws to either sideline; receivers make him look good with acrobatic catches. Back-foot throws are not accurate. Sometimes trusts his arm too much, trying to stick passes late in the play or when he is off-balance. Gets lazy with footwork at times; will flip balls into dangerous places. Pats the ball before throwing. Almost always works out of shotgun formation on passing plays. Fails to see blitzers, opening himself up to backside pressure. Tries to avoid pressure by throwing late over the middle. Old for a rookie at 28.

The guy is over halfway to retirement.





Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 02:17 am by Papa Voo



 

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There you go Stingy, Riley Reiff.  A little help keeping Stafford upright.

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Mother fuckers!!!!


WTF you were supposed to take DECASTRO...he was handed to you on a silver platter.....


MOTHER FUCKING LIONS!!!! god damnit!

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Time for the 23rd overall pick and the Detroit Lions take....




Riley Reiff, OT
School: Iowa


A diverse athletic background helped Reiff develop various physical abilities that all come into play at the important left tackle position. It began at Parkston High in South Dakota, where he was an outstanding tight end (27 catches, 321 yards, nine touchdowns as senior), defensive end (23 career sacks), wrestler (121-1, three-time state championships), track and field athlete and, surprise -- golfer. At Iowa he began as a defensive end in 2008, was scheduled to move to tight end in 2009, but when he grew from 250 to 280 pounds moved to offensive guard. When All American Bryan Bulaga was injured in 2009, Reiff played some at left tackle and had early challenges against top rushers. Reiff worked hard in offseason and after Buluga was drafted in first round by Green Bay in 2010, the Hawkeyes barely missed him. Reiff's arms (33 inches) are shorter than scouts like, but he maximizes his big frame, strong hand punch and quick feet to fend off pass rushers or open lanes for his own rushers. However, his best-documented display of footwork at Iowa occurred before he even suited up when, in 2008, he outran Iowa City Police for 20 minutes before being arrested for public intoxication.

Pass blocking: Looks like an athletic NFL left tackle. Easily turned back most college pass rushers with lateral agility and length. Natural knee-bend and reach to escort edge rushers around the pocket. Recovers to cut off inside rush lane. Effective cut blocker despite his height. Loses his pad level and must concentrate on utilizing length and feet to find targets. Stronger defenders get into his pads to punch or drive him back when he misplaces hands. Could play with a more consistently wide base.

Run blocking: Athletic run blocker with quickness and lateral movement to effectively wall off opponents on the edge. Can be unbeatable when he gets position. Reaches linebacker easily, taking precise angles. Gets fairly low off the snapfor his height in short-yardage. able to combo from lineman to linebacker very quickly. Extends his arms at the end of strong blocks for emphasis. Must keep his feet moving and hands active on runs to his side; NFL linemen will be able to shed.

Pulling/trapping: Does not trap or pull in team's zone blocking scheme, but has the feet and flexibility to get the job done on the move. Leads screens and off-tackle running plays and is an effective open-field blocker. Initial Quickness: Note elite in this category but comes off the ball hard and strong on run plays and rarely gets beat off the snap in pass protection. Quick and long enough to reach-block most linemen on zone plays, though he will give up some penetration to stronger opponents.

Downfield:
Possesses good footwork to reach second-level defenders or safeties downfield on run plays. Hip flexibility, arm length, and feet allow him to hit multiple targets, adjust to oncoming defenders, and get the correct angle to wall off the play. Intangibles: Willing to back up teammates on the field. Arrested for public intoxication, avoiding arrest in July 2008 after leading Iowa City police on a 20-minute chase on foot.


Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 02:22 am by Papa Voo

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nyhack56 wrote:
There you go Stingy, Riley Reiff.  A little help keeping Stafford upright.

Im still not happy...shouldve taken DECASTRO(who now goes to the Steelers probably)

God damn!!!! Mother fucking....jesus fuckin christ....*&^%$#

and %$#@(?:^ fuck fuck fuck



 

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stingmark wrote: Mother fuckers!!!!


WTF you were supposed to take DECASTRO...he was handed to you on a silver platter.....


MOTHER FUCKING LIONS!!!! god damnit!

You didn't exactly pick shit here though.  Reiif is going to be a good tackle, and he can play either side.

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The Stillers with the 24th pick select.....




David DeCastro, OG
School: Stanford 



Some NFL scouts believe Stanford guard David DeCastro may be an even better interior line prospect than Maurkice Pouncey of Florida, who was drafted 18th overall by the Pittsburgh Steelers in 2010 and made the Pro Bowl as a rookie. Coaches and teammates believe DeCastro's serious attitude and penchant for perfection were as important as his innate physical abilities in making him as good as he is. "He arrives angry and focused and expects everybody else to be the same," said Stanford Coach David Shaw. "If he thinks something needs to be said, he says it and when he speaks the players listen." "He is so serious he sometimes thinks a high five aftera touchdown is too frivolous because it might break concentration," offered Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck. "But the person he is hardest on is himself." Sure enough, after earning nothing but praise and honors for the last three seasons at Stanford, DeCastro's most vivid memory is one play as a redshirt freshman in 2009. It was The Sack -- the only one he gave up in his college career. "Brian Price of UCLA," DeCastro recited. "I set outside and he came back and countered inside. He sacked Andrew." Scouts think DeCastro's serious attitude and penchant for perfection will work well for him, especially packaged with his size, strength, quickness and ornery attitude on the field. It also helped that he flourished in a pro-style offense at Stanford, where he not only pass blocked for Luck, but was a key reason the Cardinal rushing game was one of the best in college football. Although his father and grandfather were both rugby stars in South Africa, DeCastro credits his size and study habits to his mother, Jennifer, who is taller than six-feet and has three degrees, including a Ph.D. in audiolgy. Still, DeCastro admits that although he loves academics he "hates to read," unless it is a playbook. Based on projections for his near future, that may be all he needs to read.

Pass blocking: Doesn't get beat. Has enough of an anchor and resets hands to get leverage if beaten initially. Keeps feet churning and his head up. Capable of blocking down with one hand and sliding to help tackle. Very aware of late blitzers, can stonewall them or ride them out of the pocket. Usually keeps arms extended in pass pro to maintain distance with his man. Loses the hand-to-hand battle occasionally but works to quickly counter.

Run blocking:
Excels as a run blocker in power, zone and on the move. Plays with his eyes up. Takes defenders to the ground and doesn't let up. Rarely allows defenders to sidestep. Not dominant as a drive blocker but grinds to the whistle.  Defensive tackles with elite power can anchor or move him off the snap.

Pulling/trapping: Dominant leading on pulls outside and traps inside. Reaches second level instantly, has natural bend and flexibility to get correct angle. Does not always dominate smaller defenders after initial contact, falling off instead of latching on, but can take out multiple targets when he squares. Will miss inside target on occasion, giving max effort to cut or reach the linebacker. Initial Quickness: Very good off the snap. Gets hands up immediately, rarely beaten with an initial pass-rush move. Swims to reach second-level defenders. Generates push in goal-line situations, firing off hard and low.

Downfield:
Has enough -- but not great -- speed. Very effective negating targets seven or eight yards downfield. Inconsistent sustaining blocks against powerful linebackers and defensive backs, lowering his head to easily be disengaged.

Intangibles: Solid work ethic and character. Known for his work on the practice field and weight room. Durable; could play every snap in any scheme. Chose Stanford for its academic standards.


Love the pick.  I thought he was going to the Lions.  Thanks, Detroit.




Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 02:48 am by Papa Voo

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nyhack56 wrote:
stingmark wrote: Mother fuckers!!!!


WTF you were supposed to take DECASTRO...he was handed to you on a silver platter.....


MOTHER FUCKING LIONS!!!! god damnit!

You didn't exactly pick shit here though.  Reiif is going to be a good tackle, and he can play either side.


You're right...I just dont "get" why they didnt go with DeCastro, he was high on every mock board.


Mother fucker better work out.......Jesus christ Im going to pop a blood vessel......

stingmark



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You're welcome papa...mother fucking Lions...WTF are you doing? god damn it


Jesus Fuckin Christ...DeCastro will be a beast for the Steelers....stupid fucking Lions...God damn it.....:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:X

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The Pats move up to the 25th pick and select.....




Dont'a Hightower, ILB
School: Alabama 


Like most of his teammates, Hightower didn't give a full workout at his March 7 Pro Day. But Alabama coach Nick Saban gave Hightower, who turned 22 on March 12, an early birthday present when he offered plenty of data for those who would listen. "Inside linebacker, nickel backer, defensive end and odd rusher," recited Saban. "He does all those things very well, he is very smart and he has leadership qualities." As a freshman, Hightower was labeled "A freak who can play any position," by teammate Rolando McClain (No. 8 overall in 2010, Raiders). He played up to the hype until he blew out his left knee in 2009 and required reconstructive surgery on his ACL, MCL and meniscus.  It wasn't really until last season that he was playing back to top form, which is comparable to a larger and more athletic Brandon Spikes (New England, second-round pick out of Florida, 2010). Hightower combines dutiful film work and great instinct to help get him quickly into position for plays, and then his substantial physical abilities take over. He is a natural leader and weight-room fanatic.


Read & React: Productive, combines good instincts and fair reaction time for his size. Finds the ball in the trash inside, doesn't take false steps against play-action and gets into his drop quickly and naturally. Missing the quick-twitch acceleration, and thus reaction speed, to project as an All-Pro type.

Run defense: Solid run-stuffer with good mobility. Stonewalls ballcarriers in the hole with the size and leverages one-on-one to churn legs and prevent forward push. Big-bodied with a defensive end's frame to drive linemen blocks inside with the thick arms to maintain distance and shed or scrape to the play. Flashes hustle to reach option toss outside even with delayed read. Aggressive defensive scheme gives him a lot of chances to makeplays on run blitzes. Lacks speed to beat the ball outside without taking the perfect angle.

Pass defense:
Top zone awareness kept him on the field in passing situations despite average speed. Drops to first-down marker quickly and watches for crossers in front of him. Very aware of RB routes with effort to attack throws to the sideline. Lacks speed and short-area quickness to handle NFL slot receivers and better tight ends in man coverage; can struggle to track and catch up with misdirection. Manhandles receivers at the line of scrimmage.

Tackling: Strong head-on tackler. Gets low and wraps ballcarriers of any size. Reacts quickly enough to shed blocks or grab the legs of backs through a hole. Good chase and closing to the sideline. Leaves his feet to grab elusive ballcarriers in space using his size and strength. Occasionally whiffs, is inconsistent breaking down to attack open-field targets and misses chances when he doesn't bend and get low in tight quarters.

Pass Rush/Blitz: Regular blitzer because of his size and strong hands. Does not have elite edge speed but started to beat tackles with quickness and violent hands consistently. Shows some situational DE potential. Strength to rock back tight ends and linemen with initial contact. Average changing direction but has the length and flexibility to bend around the tackle.

Intangibles: Heady player, often directed traffic. Worked hard to rehab from serious knee injury in 2009. Took the leadership handoff from Rolando McClain as a redshirt sophomore. Spends a lot of time in the weight and film room.

Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 02:28 am by Papa Voo



 

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stingmark wrote: nyhack56 wrote:
stingmark wrote: Mother fuckers!!!!


WTF you were supposed to take DECASTRO...he was handed to you on a silver platter.....


MOTHER FUCKING LIONS!!!! god damnit!

You didn't exactly pick shit here though.  Reiif is going to be a good tackle, and he can play either side.


You're right...I just dont "get" why they didnt go with DeCastro, he was high on every mock board.


Mother fucker better work out.......Jesus christ Im going to pop a blood vessel......

Well, if it makes you feel better, in my opinion, it's harder to get a good stud tackle than it is a guard.  I think DeCastro fits the Steelers offense a little better than your offense, given he is a little undersized and quicker and good at pulling.

I think Reiff gives the Lions exactly what they need.  Time for Stafford to go down the field to Megatron.

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The Texans finally pick with the 26th selection and take....




Whitney Mercilus, OLB
School: Illinois


Mercilus' startling 2011 season sent scouts scrambling to learn more about him, and the news was better than expected. After two mediocre seasons at Illinois, Mercilus used cat-like moves to become an All-American and win the Ted Hendricks Award as the best defensive end in the country. He led the nation with 16 sacks, nine forced fumbles and had 22.5 tackles for a loss. Of all his statistics, forced fumbles is the one that many scouts admire most. "I just have a knack for it," he said. "Throughout the game I was able to watch the quarterback's movements and just see him open up and then I just go in there and just knock it away." Scouts gush a list of positives traits, including quickness, agility, strength, instincts, condition, attitude ... and he is just beginning to mature and could be a great outside linebacker. Reaching for comparisons, they mention names like Simeon Rice, Dwight Freeney, Richard Dent, and even the great Reggie White. The U.S.-born son of parents who emigrated from Haiti in the 1980s, Mercilus played mostly soccer until high school. His 2011 season had an auspicious beginning when he lost the tip of his left index finger last spring in a weight-room accident. Teammates were shocked when he light-heartedly dismissed the injury as only a bother when he played the keyboard or tried to pick up coins.

Pass rush: Very active and plays with top effort on every snap. Moves all around the defensive line, lining up off the edge and inside at defensive tackle. Has the natural speed to win the edge and closes in a flash. Attacks gaps and is a pesky rusher, finding ways to squirm into the backfield. Hard player to block cleanly. Plays with a fighting mentality and has the violent hand usage to battle through the trash and make the play. Hustle player with a nonstop motor. Tends to play high and doesn't worry much about technique or fundamentals. Still developing his snap anticipation and will jump offside at times.

Run defense:
Lacks an obvious power element to his game and strugglesto shed blocks on run plays. Doesn't consistently set the edge and will over run his responsibilities. Still developing his recognition skills and instincts. Struggles to consistently locate the ball and will get caught out of position at times.

Explosion:
Fires off the snap with a first step burst that really stands out. A bit tight in the hips and straight-linish in his movements. Lacks great change-of-direction ability to explode laterally or smoothly redirect his momentum.

Strength: Has adequate build with very good length and overall measureables. Plays tough with the hand strength to rip the ball out and force fumbles. Lacks an ideal frame for the position and doesn't have the prototypical muscle definition. Lacks great bulk and doesn't have a lot of room to get much bigger.

Tackling: Physical in the trenches and doesn't try to avoid contact. Has long arms to wrap and wrestle ballcarriers to the ground. Takes pride in his ability to finish and complete tackles.

Intangibles:
Has only one year of starting production under his belt, causing questions about being a "one year wonder" and was a relative unknown entering the 2011 season. Had above average production in 2011, leading the nation in sacks (16.0) and forced fumbles (9) and finishing second in tackles for loss (22.5) -- consistent production week-in and week-out as a junior in 2011. Decided to leave early to help his family financially (both his parents are immigrants from Haiti).


I liked this guy.  I think this is a very good pick for the Texans.  Made a very good defense even better.




Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 02:32 am by Papa Voo



 

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Nice pick by Houston.  I am amazed at these guys that were so athletic they didn;t even play much football in high school.  That Giants have a guy like that in JPP.

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The Bungels are up again with the 27th pick and select.....




Kevin Zeitler, OG
School: Wisconsin



A perfectionist, Zeitler expects more out of himself than anybody else possibly could in class, in the weight room and on the field. His anxious, nit-picking is noticed, and not always well-accepted, by classmates, teachers and teammates. But it is opposing defenders who pay the price when the sum of his hard work pays off on the field. So, as expected, scouting reports show he does just about everything according to the book to his best ability - and he has plenty of ability. Zeitler added a significant amount of lean mass in his college career and used it well. According the NFL Draft Report statistics he led college football with 142 knockdown blocks and had 33 blocks that resulted in touchdowns, obviously a major reason Wisconsin had a per-game average of 44.62 points and 467 total yards, including 237 on the ground.

Pass blocking: Anchors against larger defenders in the middle, resets hands to maintain distance. Athletic enough to help on nose tackle then pick up twist or late blitzer. Mirrors quick interior rushers. Looks to help the center, or even the tackle a few yards upfield, if he is uncovered.

Run blocking: Good fit in a zone system, uses mobility and strength to move defender down the line. Dips shoulder and moves his feet to get outside leverage when needed. Strong and low coming out of his stance, effective in short-yardage situations. Finds the mike quickly and negates him when it is his responsibility. Gives effort to hit as many targets as possible, even if on the ground. Need to work onkeeping outside leverage when doubling on the nose.

Pulling/trapping: Good foot quickness working behind the line, though losing a few extra pounds around the middle would help his agility. Brings hips to knock back linebackers in his way, maintains block until running back finds the hole behind him. Gets down low quickly to defeat defenders trying to cut down running backs. Ducks his head at times, must keep his posture to see and sustain against his target.

Initial
Quickness: Possesses adequate quickness off the snap to get his hands into defenders and attack linebackers at the second level, but is not elite in this category and can be a step late at times.

Downfield: Regularly hits second-level targets, uses strong hands to latch on, and keeps legs churning to carry them out of the play. Knows correct blocking angles inside, gets into position with good footwork. Will punch at smaller defenders at times instead of latching on, allowing them to get off the block.

Intangibles:
Dependable, no-nonsense mauler who works hard in the weight room and on the field. Did not start the first four games of 2010 due to a high ankle sprain suffered during the summer.



Great pick....even for the Bengals.

Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 02:49 am by Papa Voo

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28th overall pick coming up with the Green Bay Packers selecting...





Nick Perry, OLB
School: Southern California


Perry opted for the draft after being named USC's Defensive Lineman of the Year following a 2011 season in which he led the Pac-12 in sacks with 9.5. Considered a 'tweener who could be an outside linebacker or defensive end, Perry wants to play the latter. So he added more than 10 pounds of lean muscle since the season ended to convince scouts. Still, many believe he projects as a stand-up linebacker in a 3-4 defense, despite not showing instincts to play in the open. His natural athleticism was on display at the Combine, where he had an unofficial 10-yard time of 1.57 seconds and showed tremendous explosion with a 38.5-inch vertical jump, a mark worthy of a good wide receiver. Scouts would also like to see more hustle on plays away and/or better conditioning as he seems to fatigue in the fourth quarter. Perry was a prized recruit after he led Detroit's King High School to a 14-0 season and a 2007 state championship with 147 tackles and 36 sacks, a Michigan prep record.


Pass rush: Has very good first step quickness and does a nice job in space. Has the footwork, body control and fluidity to quickly change directions. Does a nice job elevating and getting his hands up to knock down passes at the line of scrimmage. Works hard to collapse the pocket with a relentless motor. Brings aggressive playing style on every snap and doesn't quit. Lacks elite size and length -- undersized and can be swallowed by larger blockers.

Run defense: Read/reacts quickly with good awareness and recognition skills to chase down the play from different angles. Understands leverage and does a nice job staying balanced, getting lower than blockers and underneath their pads, usually attracting holding penalties.

Explosion:
A quick, flexible athlete with sharp burst off the snap. Shows the natural bend and coordination to dip his shoulder and consistently win the edge. Doesn't always time-up his explosion and isn't a sudden pass rusher. Strength: Uses his powerful upper body and hands to force his way into the pocket. Does a nice job swatting blocker's hands/arms with his violent, active hands. Struggles to disengage at the point of attack and will never be the strongest on the field -- functional strength is a question mark.

Tackling: Plays smart and disciplined, staying at home and restraining from biting on fakes -- listens and applies coaching. Good hand strength to secure tackles. Lacks ideal arm length, but works hard to wrap and tackle through the ballcarrier.

Intangibles: Projects best as a stand up linebacker in a 3-4 scheme at the next level, but doesn't have much experience in this area and there could be a learning curve -- can he play with his hand on the ground at the next level? Lined up in both the two and three-point stance in college. Has good production on his resume, capping off his career with a strong junior season, leading the Pac-12 in sacks. Has questionable instincts when asked to drop in coverage. Appears fatigued late in games and needs to show better conditioning.

Eh....
not impressed with Perry.

Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 02:43 am by Papa Voo

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I thought the Packers were going to go with Upshaw. Can't really second guess Ted Thompson though.

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Minnesota moves up to the 29th position via a trade with the Ratbirds and they take....



Harrison Smith, SS
School: Notre Dame



Smith was a highly regarded recruit, choosing Notre Dame over Tennessee, Stanford and Auburn. After redshirting in 2007, he soon earned his way onto the field at both linebacker and safety in 2008 as a true freshman (9 starts), recording 57 tackles, 8.5 tackles for loss, 3.5 sacks, and 7 pass break-ups. Smith started all 12 games in 2009 as a sophomore at both linebacker and safety, finishing with 69 tackles, 6.5 tackles for loss, 4 pass break-ups and 1 forced fumble. He had his most productive season in 2010 as a junior (13 starts), finishing second on the team with 91 tackles and led the Irish with 7 interceptions (fourth in the FBS) and 7 pass break-ups. Smith returnedin 2011 as a senior captain with 13 starts, recording 90 tackles, 3.0 tackles for loss, 1 forced fumble and a career-best 10 pass break-ups, but didn't record a pick-off. Smith is a hybrid linebacker/safety prospect with the build, straight-line speed and natural power to turn heads ... downhill defender whose shortcomings athletically are exposed in coverage. He is a much better player facing the action, struggling with his back to the ball. Smith is a frustrating prospect because he shows flashes with his natural skill and playmaking ability, but is too inconsistent against both the run and pass. Smith is rough around the edges and is far from starting in the NFL because of his limitations in coverage and mental mistakes, but he should excel on special teams coverage with his closing and hitting ability ... an in-the-box safety prospect who will impress physically, but shouldn't be drafted in the top-75 picks on draft weekend.

Strengths: Looks the part with prototypical size and strength for a strong safety ... long arms with a filled-out frame. Extremely strong with natural power to make punishing hits. Physical striker who enjoys contact. Fills the run lanes hard and is a downhill athlete with an aggressive nature at the point of attack. Plays fast and closes in a flash with conviction and determination ... fast in pursuit. Makes plays at all levels of the field and has strong hands to make shoe-string tackles. Read/reacts quickly and does a nice job interpreting the eyes of the quarterback. Big-time competitor and leader, never giving up on plays ... goes hard at full speed. Very active pre-snap and shows natural awareness. Played both linebacker and safety in college with 47 career starts, showing steady improvement over his time in South Bend. Very productive at Notre Dame, leaving as the only player in school history to register more than 200 tackles, 15 tackles for loss and 15 pass break-ups over his career ... finished with 307 tackles, 18.5 tackles for loss and 28 pass break-ups. Weaknesses: An upright athlete who lacks ideal body flexibility and natural explosion to hold up in coverage or space. Has tight hips and struggles to turn and quickly change directions ... plays stiff. Needs to be a more technically-sound tackler, often going for the knockout hit or forced fumble instead of wrapping up ... hits too high and loses leverage, allowing ballcarriers to pick up extra yards. Plays overaggressive and moves too fast for his eyes ... missed tackles in space and over runs plays. Has streaky instincts and doesn't see things as quick as he needs to. Still has a lot of developing to do. Needs to play under control and disciplined ... too many unnecessary facemask penalties on his record. Has poor footwork and feel in man coverage and is too hands-on when left on an island ... will attract pass interference penalties. Still made too many mistakes as a senior and didn't register an interception in 2011 after seven pick-offs in 2010. NFL Comparison: Craig Steltz, Chicago Bears


Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 02:48 am by Papa Voo

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The 49ers have the 30th overall pick and take....




A.J. Jenkins, WR
School: Illinois



Jenkins, who was also recruited by Florida, Florida State, Miami and South Carolina, was one of the more heralded recruits brought to Illinois by Ron Zook. He saw immediate action in 2008 as a true freshman, playing in all 12 games, including one start (11-287-3). He started three games in 2009 as a sophomore, but saw his production drop a bit (10-123-1), missing two games with a knee injury. Jenkins started nine games in 2010 and finished as the team's leading receiver (56-749-7). However, he really emerged in 2011 as a senior, posting team-highs in every receiving category, including a Big Ten-best 84 receptions for 1,196 yards and 7 TDs. Jenkins isn't a burner or consistent vertical threat, but he playsfast and with a degree of confidence. He is more quick than fast and covers a lot of ground in the short half of the field and is slippery after the catch. He has a lanky frame and will be overmatched physically by most cornerbacks in the NFL, but should be a solid underneath option. Jenkins doesn't appear to have the strength or natural speed to hold up on the outside as a pro, but could develop into a solid No. 3 or 4 for a team if he becomes more disciplined as a route-runner and devotes himself to the game of football.


Strengths: Jenkins is a balanced athlete with good body control and hand/eye coordination. He plays fast and can create after the catch. Jenkins does a nice job finding soft spots in zone coverage and will immediately turn upfield after the reception. He catches the ball with his large, soft hands and is tough, showing the ability to hold onto the ball after a big hit. Jenkins is a much improved route-runner with sharp moves in/out of his breaks and good field awareness. He uses his body movements to sell routes and makes plays at all levels of the field. Jenkins has a very good feel in coverage and has deceptive jets to gain a step and track the deep balldownfield. He put together a strong senior resume, leading the Big Ten in catches (84) and emerged as Illinois' go-to option through the air - producing at least four catches in every game in 2011 and set a new single game school record with 268 receiving yards (vs. Northwestern, 10/1/11).

Weaknesses: Jenkins has only average size with a narrow body type and a lean, lanky frame. He needs to spend more time in the weight room and get stronger. Jenkins' lack of strength has been exposed in a few jump-ball situations and he needs to be more competitive in tight coverage. He tends to round off some patterns and will get lazy in this area, choosing instead to abandon his routes and freelance at times. Jenkins will hold the ball too loose from his body and needs to improve his ball security and cut down on fumbles. He will try and make body catches at times, which will lead to drops. Jenkins has some experience as a kick returner, but isn't overly effective or reliable in this area. The Florida native has struggled in poor weather games, especially snow. He got into a few spats with former head coach Ron Zook and the rest of the Illinois coaching staff, so pre-draft interviews will be crucial to answering any effort or character concerns. NFL Comparison: Brandon Lloyd, Rams: Jenkins has similar build and playing style as the former Illini, but not the same type of ball skills and polish.

Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 02:54 am by Papa Voo

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The 31st pick goes to Tampa Bay and they select.....




Doug Martin, RB
School: Boise State



During the last three months, NFL scouts admit they studied hard to better appreciate Boise State running back Doug Martin. For his part, Martin admits he has come a long ways in appreciating football in general and the NFL in particular. It was widely believed that Martin's production at Boise State was due more to sheer will and hard work than it was any innate athletic ability that might help his move up pro football. But after a dazzling performance at the Scouting Combine, it was apparent Martin had the athletic ability to validate his production as a runner, receiver and returner at Boise State. He impressed scouts at the Senior Bowl in January, and thengrabbed their attention at the Indianapolis combine in February (36-inch vertical jump and 10-foot broad jump, 28 reps with 225 pounds on bench press, 4.55 seconds in 40 yards). All this put a different perspective on the 4,885 yards of total offense and 48 touchdowns he accumulated at Boise state -- including 3,431 rushing, 715 receiving and 739 on kickoff returns. That is impressive for anybody, but especially so for a guy who first honed those skills playing ferocious games of tag with his siblings. He had a radical game that included spins, rolling on the ground, leaping over people and off jungle gyms, and even running through a glass door -- once. "I was a fan of Jackie Chan, so I was doing all kinds of stuff," Martin explained in an interview last year. "I was crafty." But he knew nothing about football when he enrolled at St. Mary's High in Stockton, Calif., nine years ago. Tag wasn't a team sport, so he was told to try football. He obliged, but players laughed when he showed up with linemen's shoes and his shoulder pads on wrong. And when teammates sensed that he wasn't really savvy about football, especially the NFL, they were all over him. He recalled they would tease him by asking questions such as, "Where are the Dolphins?" He also recalls that he answered "Uh, Chicago?" His teammates eventually stopped laughing when, after he learned a little more about the game, they found out what his siblings knew already. He was hard to tag, let alone tackle. As a junior he rushed for 1,950 yards and 18 touchdowns and was team MVP. Since then, Martin has learned a lot more about football and, not coincidentally, the NFL has learned much more about him. So both he and one NFL team will have an enlightened, mutual appreciation later this month when Martin's name is called during the draft, probably in the first or second round.


Inside: Bowling-ball runner between the tackles. Flashes a burst into and out of the hole. Lowers his pads and delivers a blow into the chest of defenders. Falls forward on nearly every run due to lean. Finds creases with jump-steps and bounces into open on some plays, but buries his head too soon at times. Short build makes it difficult for defenders to find among lineman. Does not always read blocks correctly from pulling guards. Holds ball high and tight when inside. May not be big enough to move piles at the next level, but gets low and gives great effort to pick up short-yardage plays.

Outside: Good acceleration and straight-line speed to break off long runs. Cuts hard to his left and right equally well to avoid hard-charging safeties. Flashes setting up straight-on defender with inside-out cut which freezes them. Strong stiff-arm denies oncoming tacklers. Shows patience on stretch runs, plants foot and accelerates to avoid penetrating defenders or once finding a hole. Does not always move ball to outside hand. Ball gets away from his body when running at full speed; fumbled three times in 2010, twice in 2009 in limited carries. May not break away from NFL defenders as regularly as he did against non-BCS conference competition.

Breaking tackles: Low center of gravity, strong lean, and powerful legs let him bull through arm and shoulder tackles. Good balance to spin off a hit, maintain balance and continue downfield. Lowers pads on contact and churns through cut tackles in space. Cuts quickly and even jump-cuts through traffic and past second-level tacklers. Plays through the whistle.

Blocking: Does not offer much in terms of pass protection. Often subbed out in obvious passing situations, best help for the quarterback is as an outlet receiver. Does not anchor against oncoming blitzers. Poor cut tackler, defenders easily elude him. Lacks height but possesses strength, build and attitude to improve with more coaching.

Receiving:
Solid receiver in the flat, capable of running through tackles on the edge to move the chains. Flexible enough to catch passes thrown behind him. Effective on center screens, makes first man miss to get into space. Rarely goes out of bounds (unless time requires), cuts inside tacklers to get extra yardage.

Intangibles: Offensive weapon with defensive mindset. NFL body comes from excellent weight room work ethic. Teammate Matt Slater referred to Martin as a "muscle hamster" due to his compact build.

Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 02:58 am by Papa Voo

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The World Champion NY Giants make the 32nd and final selection of the First Round of the 2012 Draft.....



David Wilson, RB
School
: Virginia Tech

While his focus now is on the NFL Draft, Virginia Tech running back David Wilson has put on so many shows on and off the field that he could qualify as contestant on the television show "America's Got Talent." "I just like to have fun and I guess I'm not very bashful," Wilson explained to when asked about the many stories of his curious antics that started all the way back in grade school. "It's just my personality." NFL scouts got a peek at a little part of his personality when Wilson showed up for interviews at the Scouting Combine wearing a suit and tie, thereby setting an unofficial Combine record, or at least a first, according to some team officials. But they were more concerned if he understood football, so he was asked to draw or recognize defenses that he might face in the NFL and show he know when to do what so as not to get a quarterback hurt on a pass rush. Otherwise, there's little doubt he knows what to do when he gets the ball handed, thrown or kicked to him. With the help of track star speed -- he was timed in 4.29 seconds for 40 yards in a 2009 spring workout and looks every bit that fast in a game -- Wilson collected 4,349 all-purpose yards and scored 25 touchdowns in only three seasons at Virginia Tech. He is expected to be the second or third running back taken in the draft. While his football feats are well documented by statistics, tapes and the media, his spontaneous, off-field entertainment is more in the category of folk lore, although he verified the veracity of most of those oft-told tales. Wearing a suit was nothing new, he says. He started dressing up as a high school senior and in college wore suits, and sometimes a fedora, to class. He has done backflips since he was five years old, and rips off a few when the mood strikes him, as it did with 10 consecutive backflips before a game last year when the Hokies were going for their 10th consecutive win. Wilson likes standup comedy and often breaks into his version of a famous comedian's routine, sometimes during a lull in a team meeting. One night last summer while walking past the school's basketball arena, Cassell Coliseum, with a teammate, Wilson decided to climb the concrete arches that are nearly 100 feet high and span the building. His sprinters speed gave him a good start, then his strong legs moved him farther. But at 10 p.m. the structure was moist and slippery. So to get back down he had to crab-walk, and avoid being seen by a passing police car so as not to cause a stir. For the irrepressible Wilson, who is deeply religious, it is all in good fun and a way to burn energy. His high school track coach, Veronica Harris, had a plan for that. To harness his energy one day she entered him in the shot put, high jump, long jump, triple jump, 100 meters, 200 meters and 400-meter relay. He was too tired for extraneous goofing off, but he did win most of the events. Perhaps there is a lesson there for some NFL team.


Inside: Tough guy to bring down and almost always gets positive yardage when he lowers his pads and gets north/south. Still very raw as an inside runner, running too indecisive and struggling to find running room at the LOS ... wavers and hesitates too much when the clear opening isn't there and ends up going east/west for a loss. Lacks natural instincts with questionable vision and awareness to feel blocks and press the hole. Will slow down prior to contact and leave yardage on the field.

Outside: A smooth, explosive athlete who accelerates quickly downfield with a rare extra gear that he can reach in a hurry ... can really turn on the jets. Shows the flexibility and balance to bend and stay on his feet while avoiding tackles. He has a strong plant foot with some shiftiness to catch defenders off balance and routinely gets to the second level ... squirmy and tough. Breaking tackles: Has a strong, compact build with good muscle mass on his body ... generates power from his frame. He is physical with the strength to run through contact, keeping his legs churning and carrying defenders. Won't go down easy and picks up a lot of yardage after initial contact.

Blocking: Limited experience as a pass protector and needs extensive work on his technique. Receiving: Has only average ballskills out of the backfield and wasn't used a lot as a receiver in college. At his best on bubble screens to get him on the outside with a head of steam.

Intangibles: Runs at full speed on every play with full effort and determination ... high energy player and doesn't cheat himself. Has suspect ball security with several fumbles over his career, holding the ball too loose. Has some coachability issues, openly questioning the play-calling at times ... butted heads with the coaching staff more than a few times for not enough carries. Has only one season as the full-time starter. Participated in both football and track for his first two seasons at Virginia Tech and finished second in the ACC in the triple jump in 2010, qualifying for Nationals. Offers value on special teams as kick returner, tallying 59 returns for 1,285 (21.8) and 2 TDs over his career. Extremely productive as the full-time starter in 2011, setting several school records including single season rush yds (1,709) and consecutive games with 100+ rush yds (7) ... 10 total 100+ rushing yd performances in 2011 (ties ACC record).


Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 03:07 am by Papa Voo

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Whew!


That was a fast-moving First Round at times. 

Comments on the first round?

Winners?

Losers?

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I wish the Bears would have drafted an offensive lineman. Either Riley or DeCastro.

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nyhack56 wrote:
stingmark wrote: Mother fuckers!!!!


WTF you were supposed to take DECASTRO...he was handed to you on a silver platter.....


MOTHER FUCKING LIONS!!!! god damnit!

You didn't exactly pick shit here though.  Reiif is going to be a good tackle, and he can play either side.


I'm glad they addressed the O-Line. It should allow them to move Backus to a position he was made for.

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I wished the Niners would have drafted an O-lineman too.

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I like the Bucs two moves. They moved down and got the guy they wanted, and them moved up to draft some depth at RB.

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Damn that 1st round was a trip.  I kind of got used to teams being hesitant to move into the top half of the round because of the outrageous contracts that this was kind of fun.

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The Ultimate Sin wrote:
nyhack56 wrote:
stingmark wrote: Mother fuckers!!!!


WTF you were supposed to take DECASTRO...he was handed to you on a silver platter.....


MOTHER FUCKING LIONS!!!! god damnit!

You didn't exactly pick shit here though.  Reiif is going to be a good tackle, and he can play either side.


I'm glad they addressed the O-Line. It should allow them to move Backus to a position he was made for.



Yeah, Im better now.....hes a great player.

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The team with the most balls was Cleveland. They traded up for Alabama RB Trent Richardson and then drafted OK State QB Weeden.

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Wow, can't believe the Steelers landed Decastro at #24. It's like hitting the lottery on Christmas. I thought for sure the Lions were going to take him since they have the same issues (QB getting killed by a shitty o line).

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sek69 wrote:
Wow, can't believe the Steelers landed Decastro at #24. It's like hitting the lottery on Christmas. I thought for sure the Lions were going to take him since they have the same issues (QB getting killed by a shitty o line).


Youre welcome(Im still disappointed we didnt take DeCastro). He should be an anchor for you guys for years.

Also, maybe my Lions can snag another linemen in the 2nd/3rd rds?

If they could get: Konz/Amiri Silatu/Adams/or Malk, Id be very happy.

Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 10:49 am by stingmark

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clawmaster wrote:
The team with the most balls was Cleveland. They traded up for Alabama RB Trent Richardson and then drafted OK State QB Weeden.


They made the dumbest move of the night, IMO. Vikes were going to keep Kalil and I didn't see anybody else really moving up to take Richardson. Did you hear anything about that? It sounds more like bluffing.

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Nope, all indications were that the Bucs were going to trade up and take Richardson.  Cleveland wanted him bad enough to pull the trigger.  So the Bucs then decided to take the best player available to them as a need in Barron, then traded back into the first round to grab a good RB in Martin, since they lost out on Richardson.

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What's everybody's thoughts on Weedin? 

Can he beat out McCoy do become the starter?  His age seems to show the need to get this guy playing as soon as possible. 

Is he another Chris Weinke type of QB?

I am puzzled by this pick, because I did not get to see the guy play alot.  The numbers look good. 

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DaNkinator wrote: Nope, all indications were that the Bucs were going to trade up and take Richardson.  Cleveland wanted him bad enough to pull the trigger.  So the Bucs then decided to take the best player available to them as a need in Barron, then traded back into the first round to grab a good RB in Martin, since they lost out on Richardson.

In the NFL now these days, a good Safety is more important then a Good RB. Jim Brown was on ESPN's Scott Van Pelt show yesterday and said that He wasn't impressed at all with Richardson. Bascially said that He was overrated.

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Papa Voo wrote:
What's everybody's thoughts on Weedin? 

Can he beat out McCoy do become the starter?  His age seems to show the need to get this guy playing as soon as possible. 

Is he another Chris Weinke type of QB?

I am puzzled by this pick, because I did not get to see the guy play alot.  The numbers look good. 


ESPN was claiming that they are trying to trade McCoy now. Of course, ESPN is often full of shit, but that's what they "broke" this morning.

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Round 2 Begins

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I will try and get to as many picks as possible.  May have to step out for a little around 8:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

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2nd Round pick


St. Louis Rams take


Brian Quick/WR/Appalachian st.


Release: Was rarely challenged with press coverage due to his great size. Has long arms and a developing swat-away move to slip free, though he can get tied up and lose timing with the quarterback. Quickly generates top-end speed and can surprise the defender playing in off-man coverage with his ability to eat up the cushion.

Hands: Possesses long arms and big, strong hands. Inconsistent with his body positioning and isn't as effective in blocking out smaller defensive backs from the ball as his size would indicate. Can snatch hot passes outside of his frame and has good flexibility to adjust to poorly thrown passes. Concentration lapses cost him drops, which was again noteworthy at Senior Bowl practices.

Route running: Needssignificant work in this area, though he has intriguing tools to work with. Is a smooth accelerator whose long strides eat up the cushion quickly and get him to top-end speed efficiently. Good balance and flexibility to sink his hips and generate good burst laterally out of his breaks to separate, especially for a receiver of his size. Inconsistent route runner. Struggled a bit at the Senior Bowl when his size and athleticism weren't enough to beat defenders.

After the catch: This is the area where Quick shows some unique traits. Has good top-end speed for a receiver of his size, frequently surprising defenders with his ability to accelerate and forcing them to adjust their pursuit angles. Good strength, effort, and balance to fight through tackles and break free for big plays.

Blocking: Competitive player who uses his size and strength to effectively block his opponent despite the fact that he shows only average overall technique. Has to do a better job of keeping his feet moving to sustain the block rather than simply provide a physical shove.

Intangibles: Was a star basketball player in high school and only played one season of football at the prep level. Claimed at the Senior Bowl that he rarely received positional coaching at Appalachian State and that his experience with the Minnesota Vikings staff was first time he'd had a receivers coach.



Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 11:14 pm by Papa Voo

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2nd Round Pick



Indy takes

Coby Fleener
/TE/Stanford




Fleener is another former star high school basketball player who has the leaping ability and soft, sure hands that are mandatory in that sport and a big asset in football. Fleener lined up at almost every eligible receiver position at Stanford and was a huge target for quarterback Andrew Luck. He showed a good feel for finding soft spots in zones and had the speed and guts to run across the middle to catch passes in stride without blinking. He is not built for, nor does he seem to relish those tough, in-line blocking assignments, although he was impressive on the bench press at the Scouting Combine, hoisting 225 pounds 27 times. He was most productive as a senior with 34 catches, 667 yards and 10 touchdowns, boosting his four-year totals to career totals in included 96 catches, 667 yards and ten touchdowns, 96 catches, 667 yards (16.1-yard average)and 10 scores. He is generally considered the best of a below average group of tight ends, but helped himself with a good workout at his pro day, where Luck even threw some bad passes so Fleener had the chance to look good catching them.

Release: Lines up from a variety of positions for Stanford, including as an inline tight next to both tackles, as an H-back, as well as in the slot and even wide. Shows good burst off the snap, quick hands and good balance to gain a clean release. Has enough speed to challenge the seam but does not possess elite top-end speed for the position.

Hands: Soft, reliable hands. Presents a big target to the quarterback and knows when to allow the ball into his pads to protect it when about to absorb a big hit over the middle. Good body control to reach back for the pass behind him. Also shows the ability to high-point passes (Notre Dame), showing a good vertical, timing and hand-eye coordination in jump-ball situations. Catches the ball cleanly outside of his frame and secures it quickly. Route running: Among his better attributes. Gains a quick, clean release and has enough speed to challenge down the seam. Varies the speed of his route, using a variety of pauses and shoulder fakes to get the defender guessing. Quick feet and good balance to create some separation on the stick and post routes despite lacking elite speed.

After the catch: Above average acceleration for a big man and possesses impressive leaping ability (Virginia Tech) to avoid defenders trying to tackle him low. Only average lateral agility to elude and may not be fast enough to be a consistent threat down the seam against NFL competition. Willing to lower his shoulder and fight for additional yardage, but isn't going to strike fear into the hearts of defenders with his physicality.

Blocking: While far from an intimidator, Fleener does a nice job of helping to seal the edge when operating as an in-line blocker, showing enough strength, leverage and a solid base considering he's a former wideout. Looks to get involved downfield and will block multiple defenders on a single play when he can. Understands his role as a blocker and doesn't shirk from it.

Intangibles: Played tight end, wide receiver and safety in high school. An "outstanding" high school basketball player who earned all-area honors as a junior. Caught a career high six passes for 173 yards and three touchdowns in the Orange Bowl in 2011 -- his three scores went for 41, 58 and 38 yards, respectively -- but just two catches in the overtime loss to Oklahoma State in the 2012 Fiesta Bowl.

Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 11:15 pm by Papa Voo

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Round 2


Baltimore takes

Courtney Upshaw/DE/Alabama

Alabama head coach Nick Saban predicts that Upshaw can play outside linebacker in a 3-4 defense or "put his hand in the dirt and play defensive end" in the NFL. Based on his play in college, regardless of where Upshaw lines up he will probably wind up in a quarterback's mug. Used as an edge rusher, sometimes as the Tide's so-called "Jack" linebacker and sometimes as an end, Upshaw thrashes blockers with great hand and arm action and shows ample speed and agility to find his way into the offensive backfield. He has instincts beyond that of a pure pass rusher, with an uncommon awareness for draws, screens, counters and reverses. Although he was not asked to drop into coverage often at Alabama, he has a fluid athleticism that may allow him to adapt to such a demand. In Alabama's 49-7 thrashing of Michigan State in last year's Capital One Bowl, Upshaw was voted MVP after a pair of sacks, five tackles (three for a loss) and a forced fumble. Upshaw benched 225 pounds 22 times at the Combine and like several teammates at Alabama's March 7 Pro Day, deferred a full workout until March 29.

Read and react: Essentially asked to pin his ears back and rush the passer as a weak-side defensive end in the Tide's scheme, though he shows enough play recognition to project as a linebacker. Feels screens coming and locates the running back. Run defense: More stout at the point of attack when run at than you'd expect, given his lack of ideal size as a hybrid defensive end in Bama's scheme. Plays with excellent pad level and has very good upper- and lower-body strength to anchor. Uses his impressive swim move and quick, heavy hands to slap away the blocker's attempts at getting into his chest, showing the ability to disengage quickly. Good lateral agility to slip past the blocker and set the edge. Unselfish player. Good effort laterally and downfield in pursuit.

Pass defense: Didn't drop in coverage often. Has surprising fluidity when he does and keeps his head on a swivel. Reads eyes and breaks on the ball quickly, showing good agility for his height/weight. Might not be able to do this fulltime, meaning his future is at inside linebacker.

Tackling: This is the area in which scouts from 4-3 teams will want to see more from Upshaw -- little film of him tackling in the open field. Has the lateral agility and balance when breaking down in tight quarters to tackle elusive ballcarriers. Good upper-body strength. Capable of slowing the momentum of the ball carrier with one arm while simultaneously engaged with a blocker. Good effort and speed in pursuit. Physical, explosive tackler who can make the intimidating hit.

Pass rush: One of his best traits. Possesses a good burst off the snap and has an effective a swim move as you'll see in college football. Adept at whipping either arm over the head of the blocker and twisting his body around his opponent to gain clearance with remarkable efficiency. Heavy, active hands which he uses to bat away the tackle's initial punch. Good lateral agility to elude and possesses good straight-line speed for the position. Has a legitimate burst to close on the quarterback and arrives with explosion.

Intangibles: Established "The 41 Fund" during the spring of 2011 to raise money for tornado victims. Was arrested for domestic assault for an August 2009 altercation on campus with his girlfriend, which police happened to be on hand to witness. The charges were ultimately dropped by both parties.

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Round 2

The Denver Broncos select


Derek Wolfe/DT/ Cincinnati

A three-year starter, Wolfe was considered a three-star offensive tackle recruit, but moved to the defensive side of the ball shortly after committing to Cincinnati. He saw playing time as a reserve defensive tackle in 2008 as a true freshman, recording three tackles, one tackle for loss and one sack. Wolfe moved into the starting lineup in 2009 as a sophomore (13 starts), finishing with 41 tackles, 8.0 tackles for loss, 5.0 sacks and one forced fumble. He started all 12 contests in 2010 as a junior, recording 48 tackles, 6.5 tackles for loss, 4.0 sacks and one pass breakup. Wolfe had his most productive season in 2011 as a senior (13 starts), finishing with 70 tackles, a conference-best 21.5 tackles for loss, team-high 9.5 sacks, two forced fumbles, one fumble recovery and a pass breakup, becoming the first Bearcat to earn Big East Defensive Player of the Year honors. Just like when he came out of high school, Wolfe seems to be flying under the radar after one of the most productive senior seasons in 2011, leading all defensive tackles at the FBS level with 21.5 tackles for loss. He is quick off the ball and is the spark plug of the defense, but doesn't have explosive movements, with most of his impact in college coming on hustle plays. Wolfe never quits and keeps fighting through the whistle with an overachieving mentality, but his lack of lower-body strength and inability to take on double-teams will limit his pro potential - a solid mid-round player who is at his best when isolated in one-on-one situations.

Strengths: Has a tall, solid frame with adequate length and has done a nice job losing the bad weight and firming his body. Has a quick first step with fluid movements off the ball. A natural bender, staying low and using leverage to force his way into the backfield. Highly competitive and fierce, showing relentless effort to the pocket with a nonstop motor. Has very good awareness, keeping his head on a swivel with a good feel to quickly locate and react to the play. Tough as nails with a physical attitude and often attracts double-teams. An extremely hard worker in the weight room and doesn't let up in practice. Versatile in college, lining up in several different spots, including moving to nose tackle over the center on third downs. Stayed durable over his career, starting the final 38 games of his collegiate career. Was productive at Cincinnati, especially as a senior when he led the conference in tackles for loss (21.5) and had career-highs in tackles (70) and sacks (9.5).

Negatives: Only average lower-body strength and struggles to anchor at the point of attack. Bit of a defensive end/defensive tackle 'tweener who struggles in traffic with multiple blockers, not always using his limbs effectively to disengage. Will allow his body to get too upright at times and needs to consistently keep his pad level down to be effective. Not a quick-twitch player and struggles to quickly change directions with some body stiffness. Has streaky hand placement and usage, abandoning his technique. Lacks a natural position and there will be some concerns as to where he will fit best at the next level. NFL Comparison: Kevin Vickerson, Denver Broncos

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Round 2

Cleveland selects




Mitchell Schwartz/OT/California



Schwartz is a versatile player who does many things well but doesn't stand out in any one area, and that's likely the rep that will stay with him through the draft. Schwartz is a guy who makes it off effort and smarts. He has decent size for a tackle, and doesn't display strong skills that would encourage a move inside to guard. His size and productivity at Cal will earn him consideration in the fifth or sixth round.

Strengths He can get overpowered in the run game, but Schwartz plays with good technique. He is effective in his pass set and can sit back and let bigger players run into them yet still be effective by walling them off. He is a heady player who takes good angles to blocks and rarely falls off them. Weaknesses Schwartz's average athletic ability is the greatest knock on him. He is a bit stiff in his movements and out of his stance, and can struggle when working to the second level. He may need to move inside because of the liability he could be outside at tackle.

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Round 2


The Jacksonville Jaguars select

Andre Branch/DE/Clemson


Branch is a tall, physical and athletic end who could move to outside linebacker for a team that runs the 3-4 defense. He should be able to regularly beat NFL linemen on the rush and disrupt the passer, whether he's standing up or has his hand on the ground. Because of his versatility and pass-rushing ability, he should come off the board late in the second round.

Strengths The big, athletic Branch uses his flexibility to dip around linemen and reach the backfield. He has an uncanny knack for beating blocks and moving past linemen, and has the burst to close once he's there. He uses his hands well and sets the edge nicely against the run, but his skill at rushing the passer represents his primary value to NFL teams.

Weaknesses Branch is less effective against the run than the pass. He will play high at times, and can be overpowered by two blockers, deficiencies that will likely encourage pro teams to make him a linebacker.

Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 11:31 pm by Papa Voo

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2nd Round

The St. Louis Rams pick..

Janoris Jenkins/CB/Northern Alabama


Jenkins was a three-year starter at Florida before transferring to North Alabama after multiple run-ins with the law and the Gators' coaching staff. While there are some character concerns, Jenkins is a natural cover corner who has strong instincts and athletic ability to cover top wideouts. Size is also a concern for Jenkins, but he has shown the ability to match up with big-time SEC talent. He looks comfortable with the ball in his hands as a returner and projects to contribute there as well. If teams can overlook his off-field transgressions, Jenkins has the natural abilities to be a first-round talent and could be selected in the first 20 picks.

Strengths Jenkins is an explosive player who can stay with receivers and cover in man and zone. His ability to read plays and react allows him to be around the ball, where he uses his athletic ability, quickness, and closing speed to finish plays. Jenkins has impressive hips, and his fluidity stands out and makes him a natural at the position. A flexible athlete, he is quick-twitched and can ignite a powerful plant foot at any time or position to react on a ball or move by a receiver. Despite his size, Jenkins can jam and re-route receivers at the line and play with physicality in run support. He is a classic man-cover corner who uses his superior athletic ability and instincts to stay a step ahead.

Weaknesses Aside from off-field concerns, Jenkins projects as an undersized corner. He could have trouble adapting to the size and physicality of some top NFL receivers, as his ability to tackle and provide support against the run has been a question mark up to this point and will remain so at the next level.

Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 11:35 pm by Papa Voo

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2nd Round


The Carolina Panthers select...


Amini Silatolu/OT/Midwestern St.

Silatolu is a large, athletic interior lineman who has the ability to smother his opponents and consistently sustain his blocks through the end of plays. Coming from a small school like Midwestern State and facing little competition, he will have an adjustment period far greater than other linemen as he enters the league. A team likely will want to move him from his college position of tackle to guard, where he can use his athletic ability to get up field more often in the run game. Silatolu's greatest attribute is his footwork, as he is quick off the line of scrimmage and an active puller who can get outside, move upfield and locate his blocks to quickly engage. He does not have great leverage or explosiveness in his play but possesses many strong assets for an interior lineman, giving him early second-round value to a team with the patience to develop him into a starter.



Strengths Silatolu is a quick athlete for a man of his stature and gets off the line with a noticeable quickness. He is urgent in his play, and once engaged with a defender can keep him covered up for an extended period of time. He is a leg-driver who doesn't get a lot of movement but keeps his man occupied. He is extremely mobile and an active puller who can get outside, move upfield and locate his blocks. He can slide well in pass protection and will likely be a guard who can sit and stop rushers in their tracks in the pass game at the next level. He is a shield blocker who rarely lets a man behind him.


Weaknesses Silatolu is not an explosive blocker, and his limited time working at guard will likely slow his development as he transitions to the next level. Midwestern State does not face the level of competition or athletic type of player that he will line up against in training camp, and teams should expect he may need to develop somewhat before he can be inserted as a starter. He can be overaggressive at times and whiff on blocks; he needs to play disciplined at the next level.

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2nd Round

The Buffalo Bills select.....



Cordy Glenn/OT/Georgia


Glenn played tackle at Georgia and was a stalwart whether lined up there or at guard. The fact that many teams will want to use him at guard and could have him on the roster for variable depth early is a big reason why he could go as early as the third round in this year's draft.



Strengths Glenn is an athletic big man who is fluid when pulling and gets upfield with ease. He is an effective mirror blocker who shows good technique by sitting into his base and controlling defenders. He is aware of stunts and blitzes and usually picks them up with ease. He is a big body who has been a durable starter for Georgia.


Weaknesses Glenn is somewhat of a tweener and would struggle against NFL pass rushers at tackle. He could stand to lose some weight, as he looked like he was laboring to move at times in his senior year.

Last edited on Fri Apr 27th, 2012 11:49 pm by Papa Voo

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2nd Round


Miami Dolphins select...


Jonathan Martin/OT/Stanford



Martin is one of two tackle prospects in this year's class who could be called elite, and given the value of the position will be a likely first-round pick because of it. He embodied all that Stanford football was throughout his time there, as he is an aggressive, smart, technically sound prospect who will enter the league at a stage in his development where he should be able to contribute immediately.



Strengths Martin has prototypical skills for the position. He missed just two games in his career and is extremely tough. He carries his weight well and is one of the most technically sound prospects in the draft. He has a smooth, efficient pass set that allows him to get a solid base and work from a balanced state. He is powerful and aggressive against the run and has good footwork for his size. Martin was the anchor of a very polished offensive line and is simply an NFL-ready tackle.


Weaknesses Martin has a tendency to pop upright on contact and get slightly off balance, usually when slanting in the run game. He isn't a real powerful or violent puncher, and at times his punches will slow his feet and he can get caught off guard. He isn't a quick-twitched mover off the snap and could have some issues against the league's best speed rushers.

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2nd Round


The J-E-T-S pick...

Steven Hill/WR/Georgia Tech


Hill is an early entry junior receiver out of Georgia Tech who started consistently for the past two years and was the sole deep threat in a run-first offense. He has great length and an outstanding catch radius, which along with his speed make him a serious deep-threat option in the NFL. He has a thin frame and will be hurt by the fact that he ran a very basic route tree at Georgia Tech, and teams won't be able to utilize him for much more than go routes at this point in his career. He is a splash player who was No. 1 in the nation in yards per catch; he has fourth-round value based off his all-around body of work but could impress a team with his size and speed enough to ascend significantly throughout the pre-draft process. If the rest of his game can catch up to the ability he shows in the deep passing game, Hill could be the sleeper of this year's draft.



Strengths Hill will be a legitimate deep threat at the next level -- by recording nearly 30 yards per catch as a senior, he showed he was capable of going deep and scoring on every play. He consistently runs past corners on deep routes and is impressive at the point of the catch, as he is able to lay out for the ball or rise above his defender. Hill is a very good blocker who uses his length well and surprisingly doesn't get off-balance often, something that is usually evident of players with his frame. Though it's risky to throw early comparisons of Hall-of-Fame-caliber players on prospects that don't even garner first-round consideration, Hill could remind some of Randy Moss when it comes to running a pure, one-on-one deep route.

Weaknesses Hill's value is based purely off his ability as a deep threat. He has average quickness and moves off the line of scrimmage to avoid a jam. He ran a very basic route tree at Georgia Tech that didn't allow him to showcase many skills. Outside of catching jump balls, he struggles to read coverages and understand how to find holes in a zone. Hill looks uncomfortable with the ball in his hands and resembles a lengthy track star on the field instead of a football player. He dropped as many big balls as he made big plays; his YPC stat defines him perfectly as a player who is capable of making flash plays but isn't reliable.

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Jesus christ I want to punch some of these fuckin fans who keep booing everyone & everything, stfu already.

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2nd Round


The KC Chiefs select....

Jeff Allen/G/ Illinois


Allen has been a starter for four years on the offensive line for Illinois. With his size and experience playing on both the right and left sides, he will have good value as a backup at the next level. He has decent athletic ability and strength but knows how to keep defenders from beating him. He is likely worth a sixth- or seventh-round pick.



Strengths Allen will make it as a pro because of his versatility. He has shown that he can play four of the five positions on the line (all but center). He tends to wait for defenders to come to him in pass protection, but is able to use his hands to keep them at bay. He has decent footwork in his pass set and when in space pulling. He is also a good mirror/shield blocker. He doesn't power his way upfield very often, but his man rarely gets behind him.

Weaknesses Allen is not a flashy blocker and is slightly slow at times. He is a bit of a 'tweener, excelling at neither the tackle nor guard spots. Opponents might be able to exploit his comparative lack of athleticism.

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2nd Round


The Chicago Bears select........

Alshon Jeffery/WR/ South Carolina

Jeffery enjoyed highly productive sophomore and junior years at South Carolina, where he was a first-team All-America selection and averaged over a touchdown a game. He is an explosive jumper with an impressive frame and has the ability to be an immediate red-zone threat in the NFL. He is a long strider who is methodical in his route running but has just average speed. He relies on technique and variations in his speed.



Strengths Jeffery is a lanky prospect who uses his size well to make plays on the ball downfield. He has a massive pair of hands to go with his long arms and is an elite receiver once the ball is in the air. He has the anticipation and jumping ability to high point the ball over nearly any corner he faces. Off the line of scrimmage, he is non-explosive but uses his hands and a subtle jab step to keep defenders at bay. He can work into his route and get back on top of his defender after beating a jam. He will be a prime candidate for back-shoulder fades in the red zone.

Weaknesses Jeffery is an elite jump-ball prospect, but he does not stand out as fast on tape and is such a long strider that at times he looks to be moving in slow motion. Speed will never be his game, but he needs to become more comfortable in his routes to work the corner and truly gain separation. The development of his route-running skills will be the key to his success. Jeffery was bit uncoordinated early in his career and only began to look comfortable in his body toward the end of his collegiate career.

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Round 2


Philadelphia Eagles pick...


Mychal Kendricks/LB/California




Kendricks has been a highly productive middle linebacker with a physical presence for the Golden Bears. He has had high tackle production and has been durable in his role. He will bring a physical presence to any defense and grades out as one of the top inside linebacker prospects in the draft, with second-round value. He is physical and capable of playing in a 3-4 scheme if necessary.



Strengths He is a very solid tackler who punishes running backs when he fills the gap on inside runs.

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Round 2

Seattle Seahawks select....


Bobby Wagner/LB/Utah St.


Wagner is an impressive prospect who is a prototypical NFL middle linebacker in terms of size, tackling ability and instincts. He called all the plays for Utah State's defense. He's had more than 100 tackles each of the past two years. He is a stellar pre-snap defender and properly lines up his teammates. He recognizes the play and diagnoses where to run once the ball is snapped. He is a bit short for the position at just over 6-foot-0, but he is thick and brings power when he meets a running back in the hole. He projects to be a starter at the next level and be selected late in the second round of the draft.



Strengths Wagner can sniff out a play and read the offensive line, which allows him to hit the gap and meet a running back in the hole. He can hit, push back and disengage from linemen. He can deliver a blow to linemen and then get off the block and find the ball. He is stronger than he appears and can toss bigger linemen aside to get to disrupt a play. He has speed to run down the play outside but can be outrun at times by fast running backs. He has a motor that doesn't stop.

Weaknesses Wagner is undersized to play middle linebacker in the NFL. This hasn’t affected him much thus far in his career, as he plays much stronger than he looks, but at the next level he could get overpowered by larger linemen. He hasn't had much production rushing the passer from his spot but posts a good amount of tackles for loss and is in the backfield often.

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2nd Round


The NE Patriots take.........


Tavon Wilson/S/Illinois


Last edited on Sat Apr 28th, 2012 12:13 am by Papa Voo

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2nd Round


San Diego Chargers select....


Kendall Reyes/DT/Connecticut


Reyes is a big body inside with a decent skill set. He's a good option for a team that needs defensive line depth. Reyes is a powerful mover and a hard worker who should stick at the next level based on size and strength.



Strengths Reyes has a big frame and he uses it well. He has a strong lower body which provides him a good anchor when going up against double teams. He is savvy with his hands to keep offensive lineman off him. Reyes has a motor inside and relies more on his feet and technique to beat guys. Reyes will be a reliable player at the next level who consistently displays high effort and rarely gets completely blocked inside.

Weaknesses Reyes is a good all-around prospect, but doesn't display any jaw-dropping skills that make him attractive at the next level. He plays a bit underweight, and this can show up at times when going against double teams. Reyes will have a tough time getting into the backfield to disrupt or rush the passer at the next level.

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Round 2



St. Louis Rams select....

Isaiah Pead/RB/Cincinnati

Pead is an electrifying running back who has produced in all areas. He can catch the ball out of the backfield, make a guy miss and turn upfield for a score, or run inside the tackles. He uses his vision and athletic ability to find a hole. There are few question marks about Pead's skill set; some may worry about his play transferring to the next level, as he has shown the tendency to disappear at time. Pead should be one of the first three backs taken in the draft, with second-round value.



Strengths Pead has an initial step comparable to some of the best NFL backs. He hits the hole explosively, which allows him to get upfield and find a seam. He has good vision once he gets through the hole, and displays the lateral agility to make the first defender miss. He can dance around defenders but prefers to cut once and go. His burst, footwork and vision allow him to be a viable pass-catching option out of the backfield.

Weaknesses Pead isn't a willing blocker and barely displays the strength to stall rushers when he does step in. He has limited experience catching passes out of the backfield, and there are questions as to his consistency. He is a bit undersized and hasn't been hit enough times in college to get a feeling of what his durability will be at the next level.

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Round 2


Green Bay Packers select....


Jerel Worthy/DT/Michigan St.


Worthy is an extremely thick, tightly built defensive tackle who displayed a ton of power throughout his career at Michigan State. He chose to forgo his senior year and looks prepared to be an immediate rotational player on the front of a 4-3 scheme. He is capable of playing the nose if necessary but has the athleticism to be a sub-package 3-technique rusher.



Strengths Worthy is very thick and powerful throughout his upper body and has thigh power that helps him blow back interior linemen off the snap. He has a surprising burst for a player his size and is capable of knifing and slanting the line to get into the backfield almost instantaneously. He is a leverage-savvy player who understands how to win with either his quickness or bull rush.

Weaknesses Worthy gets upright off the snap and really has trouble if he doesn't win with a burst off the snap. He struggles in space and has a difficult time breaking down his weight to fit on a ball carrier. He can get neutralized at times by double teams, not out of a lack of strength or talent, but because of poor effort and a breakdown of technique.

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When the Packers traded up I figured they were going after Worthy. I hated him when he played at MSU, but I think it was a good pick at that spot. Decent value and fills a need.

Last edited on Sat Apr 28th, 2012 12:32 am by TXM

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2nd Round


Titans select...



Zach Brown/OLB/North Carolina


Brown might be one of the fastest straight-line linebackers to ever enter the NFL draft, making him one the most intriguing prospects of this class. He has shown sprinter-like speed on the field and should rack up tackles in the NFL. Brown projects best as an outside linebacker in a 4-3 scheme, though he would likely succeed at any linebacker position. There are many questions about Brown’s game, including whether he can adapt to the NFL after being able to make plays with minimal effort in college. Ultimately, though, he has yet to scratch the surface of his true potential; with his size and speed, he won’t be drafted any later than in the first round.



Strengths Brown finds the ball, reacts and finishes through his tackles. His speed is, without a doubt, his strongest asset and the key to his game. A natural mover, Brown excels at shedding blocks and getting to the ball. He has the footwork and hip mobility to run with any tight end in coverage. There are few running backs, even in the NFL, who can outrun Brown, and few will get open against him in the pass game. He does well in space and can work in the box, with his ability to sniff out runs as a gap defender and make explosive plays at the point of attack. He uses his pure athletic ability and speed to dip and run past linemen and get into the backfield. Brown has the power to run through running backs, whether they're blocking or carrying the ball. He is a productive tackler and rarely falls off once he reaches the ball; he will likely continue this level of production at the NFL.

Weaknesses Despite his talent, there are questions surrounding other aspects of Brown's game and life. He has shown a tendency to disappear for long stretches. He will also need to be reeled in, to ensure he sticks to the playbook and plays to his potential. Brown could stand to put on some weight, but he is otherwise physically ready for the NFL; many of his flaws have to do with his work habits.

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2nd Round


Bengals take....


Devon Still/DT/Penn State


Still is one of the most NFL-ready interior lineman of this year's senior class and arguably one of the most polished and "safe" picks of the draft. He has massive size to clog lanes on the inside and occupy blocks. Still displays good technique to beat double teams and get to the passer, and the power to bowl over would-be blockers to be disruptive in the backfield. He has been a reliable and productive player throughout his time at Penn State. A team that needs to address its run defense and add a player who will occupy and keep linebackers free in a 4-3 or 3-4 scheme likely will select Still in the middle of the first round as an immediate starter.



Strengths Still is a strong player who gets off the line quickly for his size and shows the explosion to blow back offensive guards into their own backfield. He excels as a run defender by using his strength to occupy a blocker while he reads the play and reacts, which is ideal for a nose tackle in a 3-4 defense. He has the ability to use hand technique and footwork to remove himself from blocks and get in the backfield. For a massive nose tackle, he is an above-average pass rusher who can use an array of swim and dip moves to get to the passer.

Weaknesses While Still can rush the passer, it is rare that he actually gets there to record the sack, as his athletic ability is rather average once he is in the open field. He works tremendously in tight quarters but doesn't display that quickness or explosion when free. This is true of his play in pursuit, as well. Once the ball gets past him, he usually is done for the play.

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2nd Round

Detroit Lions select.....

Ryan Broyles/WR/Oklahoma

Broyles is polished and consistent. Though undersized, he knows how to get open and make the catch. He could soon be an NFL starter based on his ball skills and route-running ability alone. His feel for space on the field and knack for understanding defenses boosts his value immensely. Even though he displays premier athletic ability, he certainly doesn't make many plays due to his size. He will have to work out of the slot in the NFL, which he was able to do throughout college. Before tearing the anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee in November, Broyles was a second-round talent.



Strengths Broyles is small but can get off the line of scrimmage well when given a free release, or if he has the chance to use a jab step, and can get upfield quickly. He can make catches across the middle but is most effective in space or when covered man-to-man, showing an uncanny ability to get open. An incredible catcher, he can torque his body in any way necessary to get whatever is thrown near him. He can also occasionally run through an arm tackle. Quick and agile, he can separate from defenders and is great in short-yardage situations. Based on his consistent production in the Big 12, his overall football savvy and his athletic ability, Broyles should be able to smoothly and quickly transition to the NFL.

Weaknesses Broyles is undersized. If cornerbacks get their hands on him at the line, he can struggle to break away and get into his route. He worked with a relatively basic route tree at Oklahoma, and it will be interesting to see how he adjusts to an NFL system. The injury he suffered at the end of the 2011 season may limit his already average straight-line speed, and could raise concerns about his durability.

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Falcons select...........


Peter Kontz/C/Wisconsin

Konz is the premier center in this year's draft, and his selection will likely be solely based off team needs toward the end of the first round. He has a massive frame for the center position but has impressive knee bend, which allows him to play the position effectively. He made all the calls at the line and was the centerpiece of a dominant Wisconsin line loaded with NFL size and talent.



Strengths Konz looks natural sitting in his stance and swiveling his head to make all the line calls, which is impressive given his uncommon height. He is a smooth athlete who has demonstrated the ability to uncoil his hips into defenders and blow them back to create quick holes in the run game. Konz is a smart player who picks up stunts well and uses his strength and anchor to sit and stall any oncoming bull rushers. He works fluidly with his guards when pulling and sealing. He has all the tools to be an elite center for years to come.

Weaknesses Even though Konz has good flexibility, defenders will be able to out-leverage him at the point given his size. He can get stunned by quick bull rushes at the point and has a difficult time resetting his feet afterward. While he is an effective short-area mover he looks limited and rigid when moving in space.

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2nd Round


The Pittsburgh Stillers
take



Mike Adams/OT/Ohio State


Adams has flashed talent at left tackle for the Buckeyes, not allowing many sacks when actually on the field. Suspensions for violating team rules and his part in Ohio State's "Tattoo Five" scandal, as well as various injuries, have kept him on the sideline too often during his career. He is not a flashy player, but he can do the job and has the frame for the next level. He will be more of a backup option when he enters the NFL and would struggle if thrown into a starting role. Based off his experience at a big-time school and frame, he should be taken somewhere in the later rounds.



Strengths Adams has a good frame and good enough footwork to not get beat at the college level. He employs a decent pass set to get back and anchor himself against the bull rush, and has the footwork to shuffle and keep his feet chopping when blocking to drive a man downfield in the run game. His big-game experience playing at Ohio State helps his value.

Weaknesses Adams is not a very exciting player and can struggle at times with effort-based issues that don't allow him to get much movement on the line when run-blocking. He is more of a catch-and-react blocker than one who delivers blows, and will need to play with more fire and look to unleash his inner-athleticism to be able to succeed at the next level. Those suspensions and injuries will also eat away at his draft stock.

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2nd Round


The Denver Broncos select


Brock Osweiler/QB/Arizona St.


Osweiler is an intriguing early-entry prospect out of Arizona State. A good athlete for the position, Osweiler was originally signed to play basketball at Gonzaga before opting to play football at ASU. He has the arm strength to be a first-day pick but hasn't shown the consistency that is characteristic of guys who deserve first-round money.



Strengths Osweiler has a very deliberate, quick-twitched setup. He slings the ball naturally, and even though he pats the ball before throwing, his release is so compact and effective he isn't hindered. His shining asset is his arm strength; he can hit nearly any NFL-caliber throw at this point in his career. He is a good leader and looks in control in the huddle and on the field. He has the pocket presence of a first-day pick and doesn't go down easily.

Weaknesses Osweiler had on-the-field judgment issues and isn't reliable to protect the ball from turnovers. It seems as if he starts to get rolling in a game, and the more confidence he builds, the more of a gunslinger mentality he adopts. This severely hinders his play. When under control, early in the game, he is athletic, accurate, and a good game manager. He is likely a developmental prospect who could struggle if forced to play early.

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2nd Round


The Tampa Bay Bucs take....



Lavonte David/OLB/Tampa Bay


David is one of the premier linebacker prospects in this year's senior class. The Fort Scott Community College transfer is undersized but able to overcome that through his instincts and speed. He had enormous tackle production throughout his two years at Nebraska, posting more than 260 tackles in his short time there. Instincts are the key to his game, as he always seems to be in the middle of action whether rushing the passer or covering tight ends. David will need to stay off blocks at the next level and either gain strength to shed linemen or continue to play instinctually to stay free. His athletic ability allows him to play loose and fly around, and he should go in the late first round to a team that loves undersized, athletic linebackers.



Strengths David has speed -- that is evident from the second the play starts. He is an instinctive player who is able to read offensive lines and trigger to get to the spot where he needs to be. He understands angles and leveraging himself when taking on blocks, which allows him to overcome his size deficiency. His footwork is fluid in transition and when moving laterally. He routinely fits up against running backs in the hole and stonewalls them at the point. He can pursue against the run to the outside and use his instincts to meet players, and he rarely whiffs on tackles. He can cover tight ends close in man coverage and works well in zone as he has natural, fluid hips to turn and pass set.

Weaknesses David is undersized, and he can struggle at times when linemen get their hands on him on run plays. If he is free he hits the gap hard, but once engaged he attempts to use his strong hands to fight away. He can cover in the long term against tight ends but can also struggle in man against them at the line of scrimmage if they overpower him. Speed and savvy can often overshadow these size and strength hitches in David's game, but his shortcomings could be exposed more at the next level.

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2nd Round


The Philadelphia Eagles take....


Vinny Curry/DE/Marhsall


Curry will have good value as a pass-rushing specialist. Curry is an explosive athlete who has the versatility to fit the defensive scheme of the team that selects him. He can stand up and play outside linebacker in a 3-4 scheme, where he can focus on purely rushing the quarterback each play. In the run game, he is effective and can set the edge nicely against an offensive tackle, but has a difficult time getting to the ball if he is engaged early. Curry has second-round value.



Strengths Curry is quick off the ball when he is focused on rushing the passer, and he can set up tackles nicely by leaning them one way and dipping the opposite. He understands how to set up and work his moves throughout the duration of the game, and can get into the backfield and rush a quarterback. Once he gets a lane, he shows an amazing burst to finish the play and get to the quarterback. On run plays and against quarterbacks alike, he is reliable and explosive. He has polished technique at the position and uses his hands well to keep blockers at bay. Although he gives up size to NFL-caliber offensive linemen, he is able to hold his ground and set the edge when necessary to allow his linebackers to make plays. His natural athletic ability is evident and the key to every play that he makes.

Weaknesses Curry can struggle at times and look out-of-place in the run game. He understands his role in the defense, but once engaged he has a difficult time getting in on any action, as he has trouble locating the ball. He has to show that he has the instincts to react and be involved late in the play once it is already away from him.

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2nd Round


The Ratbirds select....


Kelechi Osemele/T/Iowa St.


Osemele will need strong coaching, but could to be a dominant lineman based off his production at Iowa State. He has great athletic ability and gets off the line very quickly. He understands blocking with angles and within a scheme, and has the upper strength to keep on his blocks once he gets to them. Very rarely do defenders release themselves from his blocks, and if he can learn to get to the block sooner at the NFL level, he can be a stalwart for years to come. His potential as a go-to run blocker for the next decade could find him selected as early as the first round.



Strengths Osemele is an extremely strong, natural run blocker. He is explosive off the line and can visibly jolt defenders back. Once engaged, he can ignite a powerful leg drive to keep defenders at bay. If Osemele can learn to play with consistency and channel his explosiveness, he could be an overwhelming blocker who is dominant at the next level.

Weaknesses Osemele is somewhat raw and can disappear for stretches. He is highly effective once engaged, but has had trouble sticking onto blocks in the first place against more athletic players. He has to take better angles at the second level. He is not a pure tackle and may have more value at guard, which may make some teams wonder if he is worth the time and early-round investment as a project when they have an immediate need to fill.

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2nd Round

The 49ers select.....

LaMichael James/RB/Oregon


James had a decorated career at Oregon and started all but two games after redshirting in 2007. An invitee to the Heisman Trophy presentation the past two years, James has been the most electric and productive player on a very impressive offense. He was an ideal fit for the unique zone blocking scheme run by Chip Kelly and has shown many traits that are transferable to the NFL. Teams could get hung up on his size, but he has shown quality traits on a consistent basis.



Strengths James is a quick and decisive back who looks like his motive is to be productive each time the ball touches his hands. He can get to full speed quickly off the snap and doesn't hesitate when hitting the line of scrimmage. He is capable of making splash plays out of nothing. He is a better runner between the tackles than his frame would suggest, as he uses a quick shuffle to avoid trash or get up and into an open lane. Once through the line, he can make things happen on his own downfield, and routinely had runs of 20-plus yards at Oregon. He is always a threat to score, and has the foot quickness and breakout speed to get the edge at the next level.

Weaknesses James had fumbling issues throughout his career that weren't helped by a dislocated elbow midway through his junior season. He looks conscious of keeping the ball high and tight to his frame, and he has very good all-around strength, but he doesn't have the arm strength to secure the ball when big hits are put on him. He is a willing and technical blocker in pass protection but simply doesn't have the bulk or anchor to be successful here early at the next level.

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2nd Round


The Packers select.....



Casey Hayward/DB/Vanderbilt


Hayward is a highly regarded corner out of Vanderbilt. Although his team has had little success throughout his career, playing in the heart of the Southeastern Conference has put Hayward up against top talent every week, and he has made plays consistently for the Commodores. He can run with any receiver in the SEC and has shown that he can play physically at the line of scrimmage to disrupt receivers' routes. He brings a confident mentality that he can cover anyone in single coverage given the competition he faced each week in his conference. He has third-round talent.



Strengths Hayward can diagnose plays and be in position from the get-go. He will be physical when reacting to pass plays and has the speed to cover for extended periods of time in man coverage. He is a lanky player who can extend and secure interceptions when covering close. He is a reliable tackler when around the ball.

Weaknesses Hayward is a decent player in zone looks but not the quickest reactor. He trusts his speed too much at times, which can get him in trouble when he plays too far off the receiver. He is a smooth athlete but not very quick twitched.

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2nd Round


The NY Giants select......


Rueben Randle/WR/ LSU

Randle is an early-entry junior who has become a late riser in this year's class. He was limited by inconsistent LSU quarterback play all year. He is an impressive athlete.



Strengths Randle is a tall receiver who displays good balance throughout his route and leans on his defender well to create separation. He is learning how to work routes downfield and is a strong catcher of both high and low balls. He has good flexibility and really came along as a junior with his overall field awareness and ability to diagnose coverages to find his spots in zones.

Weaknesses Randle is still developing many of his skills and will be more of a prospect. He still looked uncomfortable running some routes and isn't to a point where he is actively thinking about how to sell his corner on every play. He will take his eye off the ball across the middle and is inconsistent with his physicality.

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Papa Voo wrote:
2nd Round

The 49ers select.....

LaMichael James/RB/Oregon


I like this pick. Gore is slowing down and James has supersonic speed.

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Round 2 Over

Round 3 Begins


I will not be posting each selection like the first 2 rounds.


Feel free to add comments as the draft goes along.


What was Seattle thinking?  Damn!



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stingmark wrote: Jesus christ I want to punch some of these fuckin fans who keep booing everyone & everything, stfu already.

It was ridiculous this year.  These fans are getting more retarded each year.

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The Rams have pretty much drafted a whole new team in the first two rounds, and lol @ the Jags for taking a punter in round 3.

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Papa Voo wrote:
stingmark wrote: Jesus christ I want to punch some of these fuckin fans who keep booing everyone & everything, stfu already.

It was ridiculous this year.  These fans are getting more retarded each year.


Im glad I wasnt the only one to notice it. It was so ridiculous, youre right. I think some team made a great & the stupid fucking fans booed.

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sek69 wrote:
The Rams have pretty much drafted a whole new team in the first two rounds, and lol @ the Jags for taking a punter in round 3.


Yep, they had a ton of picks & used them well.

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The Saints have made some great picks so far.

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You can sound off and tell us what you think of your team's draft through three rounds.

I think the Steelers did very good according to how it looks on paper. 

The DeCastro is solid, and I see this guy being around for at least 10 years.

Mike Adams is a worrisome pick.  The guy is a repeat offender and seems to have problems with maturity and just being undisciplined.  This type of personality and attitude could spill over into many areas.  There are some insiders saying that he will not be with the Steelers three years from now.  The Steelers are really going to have to try and mentor this guy.  I did not like the Santonio Holmes pick for these same reasons when he was selected.  He had a trunk full of reported and unreported baggage and it could not be bridled even after the Steelers made him a part of their team. 

Sean Spence was the Third round pick, and the Steelers have already made it clear that he will be an ILB.  I think he can flourish on special teams and possibly as nickel guy who can be brought into cover guys like Ray Rice out of the backfield and tight ends, but I am not sure he was worthy of the third Round pick. He seems like a faster version of Larry Foote, and Foote gets blown up at the LOS most of the time because he is too light.

I thought Alameda Ta'Amu would be the Third Round pick.  He is still on the board.  I think with the right management he would be a nice replacement for "The Big Snack" Casey Hampton. 

The draft would get an A on paper, but it could turn into a C or D real fast depending on how these guys pan out.

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Papa Voo wrote: You can sound off and tell us what you think of your team's draft through three rounds.

I think the Steelers did very good according to how it looks on paper. 

The DeCastro is solid, and I see this guy being around for at least 10 years.

Mike Adams is a worrisome pick.  The guy is a repeat offender and seems to have problems with maturity and just being undisciplined.  This type of personality and attitude could spill over into many areas.  There are some insiders saying that he will not be with the Steelers three years from now.  The Steelers are really going to have to try and mentor this guy.  I did not like the Santonio Holmes pick for these same reasons when he was selected.  He had a trunk full of reported and unreported baggage and it could not be bridled even after the Steelers made him a part of their team. 

Sean Spence was the Third round pick, and the Steelers have already made it clear that he will be an ILB.  I think he can flourish on special teams and possibly as nickel guy who can be brought into cover guys like Ray Rice out of the backfield and tight ends, but I am not sure he was worthy of the third Round pick. He seems like a faster version of Larry Foote, and Foote gets blown up at the LOS most of the time because he is too light.

I thought Alameda Ta'Amu would be the Third Round pick.  He is still on the board.  I think with the right management he would be a nice replacement for "The Big Snack" Casey Hampton. 

The draft would get an A on paper, but it could turn into a C or D real fast depending on how these guys pan out.

That's the thing. You can't fairly grade a draft class until 2-3 years down the line. Right now all you can look at is teams needs and the perceived value of each player in the spot they were chosen.

For the Packers, the needed to fortify their front seven, which they did with Perry and Worthy. They also needed help in the secondary, and they got Heyward.

The Packers had a lot of picks in this draft, and I like that they were aggressive in moving up to get the players they wanted.

All the players chosen look like they can come in and contribute right away, in areas of need, so it looks like a good draft thus far.

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Papa Voo wrote:

The DeCastro is solid, and I see this guy being around for at least 10 years.



I thought DeCastro was a steal at number 24

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Steelers take Ta'Amu.  Thanks for a great career, Big Snack, but the new blood needs to be infused.  I am surprised with the Steelers draft thus far, they usually turn into train wrecks after the First Round. 

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Nobody has commented on this thread about the Redskins selecting QB Kirk Cousins.  It seems like the story is red hot in Washington, DC.  What would you think if you were EG3 and the Redskins use a luxury pick on a QB like Cousins while they have pressing needs throughout the team.  I just watched the press conference of RG3 addressing the Washington DC reporters for the first time and one of the first questions dealt with the drafting of Cousins. I think it is a ridiculous pick.

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Maybe Washington is just tired of Rex Grossman & John Beck.

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The Skins told Beck and his agent he was being released

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clawmaster wrote: Maybe Washington is just tired of Rex Grossman & John Beck.


Yeah, but why the need to create controversy for your young QB?  If, this is a big "if" but if RG3 runs into a some bad games, the crowd will be clamoring for Cousins.  I think it is stupid.

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Draft Rankings from Pete Prisco





The Cincinnati Bengals have been the punch line for a lot of jokes, many of those aimed at owner/general manager Mike Brown.
The Bengals have a skimpy scouting staff and other teams privately laugh at how they refuse to spend bigger on scouting.
Maybe Mike Brown has it right. After all, his team had the best draft of any of the 32 NFL teams this year.
I gave the Bengals an A+, a three-day pick-a-thon that netted them a lot of good football players. It helped that they had extra picks because of their trade of Carson Palmer to the Raiders last year, but it's what they did with all those picks that truly impressed.
I see the Bengals adding 10 solid football players, all with a chance to make the team, even sixth-round running back Dan Herron from Ohio State. Top pick Dre' Kirkpatrick will likely be a Week 1 starter while several others have a chance to start.
That's dominating a draft. Here are big props to Mike Brown and the Bengals, who might be laughing at the rest of the league now.

Arizona Cardinals Best pick: Third-round corner Jamell Fleming will help fill a big need with the departure of Richard Marshall. He was a good player for Oklahoma.
Questionable move: I didn't like the Michael Floyd pick in the first round. He doesn't run well enough to warrant that pick. And they had a lot of other needs.
Third-day gem: I like San Diego State quarterback Ryan Lindley, a player they took in the sixth round. He has a big arm and can make all the throws. If he gains some consistency, he has a chance.
Analysis: The Cardinals have offensive-line issues and waited until the fourth round to take Bobby Massie to address it. I didn't like the Floyd pick, which dampens this grade. They did some good things later.
Grade: C+

Atlanta Falcons Best pick: Landing center Peter Konz it the second round fills a need with Todd McClure getting up in years. Konz can also battle for the right guard spot.
Questionable move: Taking Lamar Holmes in the third round. Yes, he has some athletic ability, but there were some more polished options on the board.
Third-day gem: Fifth-round pick Jonathan Massaquoi has speed off the edge. He might take some adjusting coming from Troy, but that's the same school that produced DeMarcus Ware.
Analysis: They traded their first-round pick to get Julio Jones last year. That forced them to wait until the second round to pick. Give them credit for addressing their line needs. Jones is the key to this draft. He has to be a star to make the trade worthwhile.
Grade: C

Baltimore Ravens Best pick: They traded out of the first and still ended up with a player they really liked in Courtney Upshaw. That's great value for him in the second round.
Questionable move: They took Iowa State tackle Kelechi Osemele in the second round and he will likely project to guard. I think they needed to get a guy who they know could play tackle.
Third-day gem: Sixth-round pick Tommy Streeter is a long wide receiver from Miami who has the speed to get vertical. He didn't always produce as expected at Miami, but he has the tools.
Analysis: One thing about the Ravens is when they are done drafting you know that Ozzie Newsome will find good football players. They always seem to do so. Moving out of the first and landing Upshaw was a nice move. They added some nice third-day pieces as well.
Grade: B+

Buffalo Bills Best pick: I really liked the Bills getting Cordy Glenn in the second round. He had first-round ability and should be an immediate starter at left tackle.
Questionable move: They took North Carolina State receiver T.J. Graham in the third round in large part because he can fly. But he dropped a lot of passes in college and that might have been too high.
Third-day gem: Florida State tackle Zebrie Sanders was a nice value pick in the fifth round. He was a quality starter for the Seminoles.
Analysis: The Bills landed a top cover player in the first round in Stephon Gilmore and then waited to take a tackle in Glenn in the second. It proved to be a good strategy. Both players should start. They added some other nice players in the later rounds. The one concern is Graham.
Grade: B

Carolina Panthers Best pick: Fourth-round receiver Joe Adams is a nice player. He has the look of a good slot receiver.
Questionable move: It's quibbling, but taking Amini Silatolu in the second round over some bigger-school lineman is a risk. I like the kid, though, so I am nitpicking.
Third-day gem: Fifth-round corner Josh Norman comes from small-school Coastal Carolina. He impressed during the season, but didn't have a great Senior Bowl week. Some scouts think it was too big for him. But he has the ability if he can adjust.
Analysis: General manager Marty Hurney had a heck of a draft. It started with linebacker Luke Kuechly in the first round and it continued all the way through it. I love Adams and Norman on the final day.
Grade: B+

Chicago Bears Best pick: Third-round safety Brandon Hardin has played corner, so he has range. He missed the 2010 season with a shoulder injury, but is healthy now. Rangy safeties are in vogue now.
Questionable move: I didn't like the pick of receiver Alshon Jeffery in the second round. He is too much like Brandon Marshall and doesn't run well enough.
Third-day gem: Isaiah Frey is a corner from Nevada who faced some good passing teams in college. He isn't a great man player, but might be a nice nickel corner.
Analysis: They took Shea McClellin in the first round and he will play left end, although a lot of scouts saw him as a 3-4 outside rusher. I think he'll be fine as an end. I didn't like the Jeffrey pick and they didn't get a lot the rest of the way. I do like Hardin.
Grade: C

Cincinnati Bengals Best pick: It wasn't a sexy pick, but taking Wisconsin guard Kevin Zeitler in the first round will pay off. He's a tough, aggressive player. Should be a rookie starter.
Questionable move: I thought they should have looked for a speed receiver instead of taking Muhammad Sanu in the third round.
Third-day gem: Cal receiver Marvin Jones might end up being better than Sanu. Jones isn't a burner, but he knows how to get open and run routes.
Analysis: What's not to like? The list of 10 is impressive. They acted like they owned the draft. Heck, they did.
Grade: A+

Cleveland Browns Best pick: Second-round pick Mitchell Schwartz is a tough, nasty player who will start at right tackle. Scouts I talked to loved this kid. I agree. Nice pick.
Questionable move: Taking Brandon Weeden in the first round. That was a reach. Is he that much better than Colt McCoy? And he'll be 29 in October.
Third-day gem: Fourth-round receiver Travis Benjamin went to Miami as a huge recruit. He didn't put up big numbers, but he has explosive ability.
Analysis: The Browns had a bad first round in my mind, which knocks their draft down. They had two first-round picks, and traded up to get Trent Richardson. I just don't see how trading up for a back is a good thing -- even a good back like Richardson. Taking Weeden is a real reach. They did bounce back some, but I don't like the way they started.
Grade: C-

Dallas Cowboys Best pick: Trading up to land corner Morris Claiborne was a great move for the Cowboys. They landed the best cover player in the draft with a sharp move up to get him.
Questionable move: Not much to quibble with here, other than not addressing the depth issues on the offensive line with any of their picks.
Third-day gem: Fourth-round pick Kyle Wilber has some pass-rush ability and could end up as a special-teams player.
Analysis: It's hard to argue with moving up to get Claiborne, who gives the Cowboys their best cover player in years. They did give up a second-round pick to do it, but it made sense. I like third-round end Tyrone Crawford as well.
Grade: B+

Denver Broncos Best pick: I really like third-down back Ronnie Hillman from San Diego State. Peyton Manning will love his quickness and ability to come out of the backfield.
Questionable move: Trading out of the first round and then taking Cincinnati defensive tackle Derek Wolfe in the second. He will be compared to the other tackles they could have had.
Third-day gem: Cornerback Omar Bolden, taken in the third round, has the ability to be a starter. He missed 2011 with a torn ACL, so there is value here.
Analysis: John Elway and crew had a decent draft, but not a great one. The pick of Brock Oseweiler in the second round probably surprised some people, but they need a long-term answer for when Manning retires. They did get some nice third-day guys.
Grade: C+

Detroit Lions Best pick: Third-round corner Dwight Bentley has a lot of athletic ability and could push for a spot as a rookie in the three-corner sets. He played well against some good teams in his career.
Questionable move: Taking Oklahoma receiver Ryan Broyles in the second round is a real risk. He is coming off a torn ACL and wasn't a burner before that.
Third-day gem: Fourth-round linebacker Ronnell Lewis was a nice player at Oklahoma. He has some pass-rush skills, but will have to transition to a 4-3 outside linebacker.
Analysis: They landed tackle Riley Reiff in the first round, which is a nice pick. Broyles is a risk, so that drops the grade down some. This wasn't a great draft, but it could be if Broyles returns to his pre-injury form. I like where this team is heading with Martin Mayhew.
Grade: C+

Green Bay Packers Best pick: Second-round defensive tackle Jerel Worthy should have been a first-round pick. He was a force at times at Michigan State. He will be the same for the Packers.
Questionable move: I don't think the Packers are getting a great player in first-round pick Nick Perry. Some scouts think he's soft. We'll see.
Third-day gem: Terrell Manning, an outside linebacker from North Carolina State, has a chance to stick at a position of need. He has some toughness about him.
Analysis: I didn't like the pick of Perry, but it's hard to argue with Ted Thompson's track record. I love their two second-round picks. They get Worthy first and then land Vanderbilt corner Casey Heyward. Thompson traded up to get both of them when he saw value. He gets it.
Grade: B

Houston Texans Best pick: Third-round pick Brandon Brooks can play either guard or tackle, two trouble spots for the Texans on the right side. He is a physical, athletic player.
Questionable move: I didn't like the pick of Whitney Mercilus in the first round. I just didn't see the explosive ability from him on tape and he didn't really fill a need.
Third-day gem: I love the pick of Nebraska defensive end Jared Crick in the fourth round. Were it not for an injury last year, he might have gone higher.
Analysis: While I didn't like Mercilus, I did like the rest of their draft. I liked two of their three fourth-round picks, Crick and receiver Keshawn Martin. I just think in the first round they could have gone in a different direction.
Grade: B

Indianapolis Colts Best pick: Can it be anybody else but Andrew Luck? It wasn't hard to make the decision to take him with the first pick, but it still deserves this spot.
Questionable move: Taking tight end Dwayne Allen in the third round after taking Coby Fleeener in the second was strange. They had so many other needs.
Third-day gem: Fifth-round pick Josh Chapman had knee surgery after the 2011 season, but I think he's a steal here. He's a short, compact tackle who should be in the rotation as a rookie.
Analysis: I really like what first-year general manager Ryan Grigson did, except for the Allen pick, and that has nothing to do with the player but the position. Grigson picked a lot of good football players. I love Fleener and third-round receiver T.Y. Hilton.
Grade: A

Jacksonville Jaguars Best pick: Moving up for Justin Blackmon was a nice decision. They had to get a big-play receiver.
Questionable move: Did they really draft a punter in the third round? Taking Bryan Anger there was the worst move of this draft -- by any team.
Third-day gem: Fifth-round linebacker Brandon Marshall is a tough player who should make the roster at a thin position. Scouts think he'll be good as a special-teams player.
Analysis: The first two picks of Blackmon and defensive end Andre Branch nailed it. Taking Anger really put a dark cloud over what should have been a really good draft. There is no justification for that pick.
Grade: B-

Kansas City Chiefs Best pick: Taking running back Cyrus Gray in the sixth round could prove to be one of those late-round gems. Gray was a productive runner at Texas A&M.
Questionable move: Taking Dontari Poe in the first round is a risk. He looks the part, but he didn't play to his athletic skills. He's a boom or bust guy.
Third-day gem: Receiver Devon Wylie, a fourth-round pick, will be a nice slot receiver. He can also help out the return game.
Analysis: The Chiefs filled some needs, starting at nose tackle with Poe. He has to play to his athletic ability or that pick will be a bust. They drafted two offensive linemen after him, which helps fill a need. The draft was just OK.
Grade: C

Miami Dolphins Best pick: Third-round tight end Michael Egnew has the ability to split out and create matchup problems. He's what you want in a tight end.
Questionable move: Taking Ryan Tannehill with the eighth overall pick is a risk. He has tools, but limited starts. Did they overdraft because of the need at the position?
Third-day gem: Running back Lamar Miller might have some shoulder issues, but he is an explosive runner. The Dolphins might have nailed a special back.
Analysis: The draft will be graded on the Tannehill pick in the long run. If their analysis is accurate, and he's a franchise passer, this will be a really nice draft. If not, well, this regime won't be around long. I liked what they did after Tannehill a lot. But he is this draft.
Grade: B+

Minnesota Vikings Best pick: I love that they stayed true to what they wanted and picked tackle Matt Kalil and added picks in a trade down to do it. Kalil is a 10-year starter.
Questionable move: Using a fourth-round pick on a fullback isn't wise. They took Southern California's Rhett Ellison to be a lead blocker. That's a waste of a good pick.
Third-day gem: Fourth-round receiver Jairus Wright is a good slot receiver who will help add some quickness to a passing game that needs it.
Analysis: Rick Spielman did a nice job trading back, landing extra picks and still getting Kalil. They then came back into the first round to take a starting safety in Harrison Smith in a year where that position was lean. Good job.
Grade: B+

New England Patriots Best pick: Some questioned Chandler Jones, the team's first pick. Not me. I think he will develop into a nice pass rusher for a team that needs it.
Questionable move: Drafting safety Tavon Wilson in the second round. Most scouts had him rated down the board. But Bill Belichick has to like his versatility since he has played corner as well.
Third-day gem: They took Nebraska corner Alfonzo Dennard in the seventh round. That's great value. He did have an arrest, but don't the Patriots have a car wash outside their facility to clean off player stink?
Analysis: Belichick usually trades back, but moved up twice to land Jones and Dont'a Hightower. Those picks are solid, even if I didn't like the trade up to get Hightower as their second first-round pick. The pick of Wilson could decide this draft.
Grade: B-

New Orleans Saints Best pick: Fourth-round receiver Nick Toon was a productive player at Wisconsin. He should be able to compete for a No. 4 job, which is a spot that sees the field for the Saints.
Questionable move: Bounty-gate. That caused them to get stripped of a key second-round pick.
Third-day gem: Guard Andrew Tiller, a sixth-round pick, plays with a nasty streak that fits the Saints' line. They put great emphasis on their guards with a small quarterback.
Analysis: It has been a tough four months for the Saints. This draft didn't do much to help them. They were without a first-round pick because of a bad trade for Mark Ingram last year. They lost their second in the scandal and then used the third on a defensive tackle from Canada. The beat goes on in New Orleans and it isn't a good one.
Grade: F

New York Giants Best pick: The Giants had a first-round grade on receiver Reuben Randle and still landed him at the end of the second. That's value.
Questionable move: Taking Jayron Hosley in the third round is risky because he tested positive for marijuana at the combine. That's either a sign of stupidity or a problem.
Third-day gem: Fourth-round tackle Brandon Mosley from Auburn is a nice developmental choice. It might take this former defensive player a year or two to be in the mix, but he's worth a look. He is athletic.
Analysis: The Giants took running back David Wilson in the first round to fill a need. His only knock is fumbling. But he should get carries as a rookie. Randle was good value and Hosely could be a hit if he's past his problems.
Grade: B

New York Jets Best pick: Second-round receiver Stephen Hill has the tools to be an explosive player, but he is raw. Can this regime get the best out of him? If they can, he will be a steal. Boom or bust pick.
Questionable move: Taking Quinton Coples in the first round is a strange move for this team. He doesn't seem to fit what they do. Oh, and he also took last season off at North Carolina.
Third-day gem: Running back Terrance Ganaway put up big numbers in Baylor's offense. He is a big back at 239 pounds.
Analysis: The Jets took two players in the first two rounds who are risks. Is that really something this front office and staff can afford to do? Add in the stupid Tim Tebow trade, and the Jets haven't had a great start to 2012. It's a feast-or-famine draft.
Grade: C-

Oakland Raiders Best pick: Third-round pick Tony Bergstrom is a tough guy who could play either tackle or guard. He could push right tackle Khalif Barnes.
Questionable move: Losing a third-round pick to take quarterback Terrelle Pryor in last year's supplemental draft. That was a waste.
Third-day gem: Fifth-round receiver Juron Criner was a productive player at Arizona. He should be in the mix for time as a rookie.
Analysis: They didn't pick until the third round because of the trade for Carson Palmer, which cost them their first- and second-round picks. But would they have picked anything more valuable than Palmer with those two picks? Doubtful.
Grade: D (not counting Palmer)

Philadelphia Eagles Best pick: Second-round linebacker Mychal Kendricks is a run-and-chase linebacker who will fit in perfectly with the Eagles scheme.
Questionable move: Taking Nick Foles in the third round. The Eagles love to take developmental quarterbacks, but Foles has bad feet. He needs a lot of coaching.
Third-day gem: Some considered fourth-round corner Brandon Boykin a potential first-round pick at one point, but a broken leg hurt his stock. They might have a steal here.
Analysis: The Eagles landed three good defensive players with their first three picks, including top pick Fletcher Cox. They had to improve that side of the ball. After that, they picked up some quality players in the latter rounds. It was a good weekend for the Eagles.
Grade: B+

Pittsburgh Steelers Best pick: They had to race the pick up when Stanford guard David DeCastro fell to them in the first round. He will be a 10-year starter and is a perfect Steelers player.
Questionable move: Taking Ohio State tackle Mike Adams in the second round. He has character concerns, big ones, but the Steelers felt he was worth the risk. We'll see. He's a good player.
Third-day gem: There was some talk that fourth-round pick Ta'amu Alameda could be at least a second-round pick. The Steelers did a great job snagging him as a potential replacement for Casey Hampton in the fourth.
Analysis: Steelers general manager Kevin Colbert proved again over three days why he is one of the NFL's best. Look up and down the Steelers' draft board and you will see productive college players. There is some risk with Adams, but you almost have to trust Colbert on that one.
Grade: A

St. Louis Rams Best pick: Third-round corner Trumaine Johnson has the ability to be an immediate starter. He just looks the part, even if he played at small-school Montana.
Questionable move: Taking corner Janoris Jenkins in the third round is a risk considering his background. He has talent, but can he stay out of trouble?
Third-day gem: Fifth-round receiver Chris Givens has the speed the Rams' offense needs on the outside.
Analysis: They actually traded down twice in the first round and ended up with a bounty of picks. They used those picks to improve a team that needed it. Their second pick (Brian Quick) and Jenkins are risky.
Grade: B-

San Diego Chargers Best pick: It was their first one, landing outside linebacker Melvin Ingram in the first round. Ingram is this draft's best pass rusher.
Questionable move: Not taking an offensive lineman with any of their first four picks. They need help there.
Third-day gem: Fourth-round pick Ladarius Green might be a replacement for aging Antonio Gates in couples of years. He is a vertical tight end who can stretch the field. Some scouts think he looks like a receiver.
Analysis: A.J. Smith did a nice job. He stayed put and landed Ingram and then got two other potential starters in the second and third rounds for the defense. Nice job.
Grade: B+

San Francisco 49ers Best pick: Most draft analysts ripped the pick of A.J. Jenkins in the first round. I liked it. The kid can fly. He just needs a little polish. Just keep him away from the knucklehead receivers on the roster -- and there are plenty.
Questionable move: Why did they take LaMichael James in the second round? Don't they have a glut of backs? Didn't they take Kendall Hunter last year? I like James, just not here.
Third-day gem: Safety Trent Robinson has the range to play free safety. As a sixth-round pick, I think he has chance to make the team and do even more in a year or two.
Analysis: I liked the Jenkins pick to start the draft, but taking James in the second really didn't make a lot of sense. They bounced back with some decent picks after that, but not a great weekend for the 49ers.
Grade: C-

Seattle Seahawks Best pick: Second-round linebacker Bobby Wagner is an athletic kid who should push for a starting job right away. He is a Pete Carroll-type of LB.
Questionable move: Their first pick, taking defensive end Bruce Irvin. He had some character issues and some scouts think he doesn't play hard enough. He can rush the passer, so the attraction is obvious. Risky.
Third-day gem: Defensive tackle Jaye Howard, their second fourth-round pick, is a good player. He will come in and win a spot in the rotation as a rookie.
Analysis: They made a questionable move at the top with Irvin, bounced back by taking Wagner, but then took Russell Wilson in the third when they just signed Matt Flynn. Why? They did some good things on the final day, but Irvin is the key.
Grade: C+

Tampa Bay Buccaneers Best pick: They landed a future Pro Bowl player in second-round linebacker Lavonte David. They have their next Derrick Brooks.
Questionable move: Trading out of their spot in the first round to pass on Morris Claiborne and take safety Mark Barron. Corner is a much more valuable position than safety.
Third-day gem: Linebacker Najee Goode is a run-thumper from West Virginia who is worth a look in the fifth round. He plays the run well. Has played inside and outside.
Analysis: The Bucs landed three starters with their first three picks in Barron, running back Doug Martin (who I really like) and David. That's a nice bounty. I don't know if Barron is quite the player some think he will be, but Tampa Bay had a big-time need there.
Grade: B

Tennessee Titans Best pick: Third-round pick Mike Martin is an undersized defensive tackle who is a mauler. He will be a contributor from the get-go. I love guys like him.
Questionable move: Taking Zach Brown in the second round. He has all the tools, but he never played to them. Some say he shies away from contact.
Third-day gem: Safety Markelle Martin from Oklahoma State is a nice late-round pick. He was a productive player in college.
Analysis: I really liked the pick of Kendall Wright in the first round and Martin in the third. Wright will be somebody who can grow with Jake Locker. Other than those two, this draft didn't excite.
Grade: B-

Washington Redskins Best pick: Robert Griffin III was their first pick, second overall, but they get props for moving up to make the pick.
Questionable move: Why take quarterback Kirk Cousins in the fourth round after taking Robert Griffin III in the first? That's a luxury pick.
Third-day gem: FAU running back Alfred Morris came in the sixth round. Mike Shanahan once drafted Terrell Davis in the sixth round. Morris is smaller than Davis, but has the same type of cutting ability.
Analysis: Getting Griffin was the right thing to do. They have their franchise passer. But they didn't do much after that. They didn't have a second-round pick, but I also don't like what they did with the rest of their picks.
Grade: B-

DaNkinator



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Papa Voo wrote: Nobody has commented on this thread about the Redskins selecting QB Kirk Cousins.  It seems like the story is red hot in Washington, DC.  What would you think if you were EG3 and the Redskins use a luxury pick on a QB like Cousins while they have pressing needs throughout the team.  I just watched the press conference of RG3 addressing the Washington DC reporters for the first time and one of the first questions dealt with the drafting of Cousins. I think it is a ridiculous pick.

I don't think so.

He was drafted 102nd overall, in the 4th round. That's not a high pick. That's a backup pick. And that's exactly why they drafted him. He's not going to be challenging RGIII for a job. There's a reason he fell out of the top 100, and this is why. Grossman, more than likely won't be around after this year, so it only makes sense to have a decent backup when he's gone. They used this pick wisely.

And it's not like that pick would have been used wisely elsewhere. Anyone else drafted there would likely be a reserve as well, so why not do it for the most valued position on the team?

Seems a lot of people are calling this a dumb pick or a luxury pick.  Rosenthal said it best when he said that the Redskins believe Cousins can be a good BACKUP QB.  Those aren't a luxury in the NFL, they're a requirement.

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I still think it was a stupid pick with all the needs on that team.  I would gamble on lightning in the bottle in regards to lineman or even a linebacker for special teams. 

They are going to want a a veteran backing up RG3.  You do not want two rookies on the depth chart back to back.  At best, Cousins becomes somewhat oriented with the NFL and moves on after his contract. 

I still do not get it.  They can twist anyway that they want it; it was ridiculous pick for this year.

Benlen



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Papa Voo wrote:
I still think it was a stupid pick with all the needs on that team.  I would gamble on lightning in the bottle in regards to lineman or even a linebacker for special teams. 

They are going to want a a veteran backing up RG3.  You do not want two rookies on the depth chart back to back.  At best, Cousins becomes somewhat oriented with the NFL and moves on after his contract. 

I still do not get it.  They can twist anyway that they want it; it was ridiculous pick for this year.

I agree. There was no QB chosen until 81 picks later. Kellen Moore was never drafted and I think he's better than Cousins.Redskins aren't good enough to draft a clipboard holder in the 4th round .

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Benlen wrote: Papa Voo wrote:
I still think it was a stupid pick with all the needs on that team.  I would gamble on lightning in the bottle in regards to lineman or even a linebacker for special teams. 

They are going to want a a veteran backing up RG3.  You do not want two rookies on the depth chart back to back.  At best, Cousins becomes somewhat oriented with the NFL and moves on after his contract. 

I still do not get it.  They can twist anyway that they want it; it was ridiculous pick for this year.

I agree. There was no QB chosen until 81 picks later. Kellen Moore was never drafted and I think he's better than Cousins.Redskins aren't good enough to draft a clipboard holder in the 4th round .

I was sort of shocked that Moore was not drafted. 

I was surprised to hear all commentators and analysts rip on Moore so bad.  I did not know that he did so bad in the quarterback drills.  They basically said he is not athletic at all.  They said he understand the game and has a nice touch with his passes, but he is not very mobile and is clumsy and awkward.

Does anybody feel that he will be a good NFL QB?  Most already wrote him off as a player and think he will be a great coach. Anybody have any opinions on him?

Benlen



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Papa Voo wrote:

Benlen wrote: Papa Voo wrote:
I still think it was a stupid pick with all the needs on that team.  I would gamble on lightning in the bottle in regards to lineman or even a linebacker for special teams. 

They are going to want a a veteran backing up RG3.  You do not want two rookies on the depth chart back to back.  At best, Cousins becomes somewhat oriented with the NFL and moves on after his contract. 

I still do not get it.  They can twist anyway that they want it; it was ridiculous pick for this year.

I agree. There was no QB chosen until 81 picks later. Kellen Moore was never drafted and I think he's better than Cousins.Redskins aren't good enough to draft a clipboard holder in the 4th round .

I was sort of shocked that Moore was not drafted. 

I was surprised to hear all commentators and analysts rip on Moore so bad.  I did not know that he did so bad in the quarterback drills.  They basically said he is not athletic at all.  They said he understand the game and has a nice touch with his passes, but he is not very mobile and is clumsy and awkward.

Does anybody feel that he will be a good NFL QB?  Most already wrote him off as a player and think he will be a great coach. Anybody have any opinions on him?

The only knock on him that I heard is he's undersized but he's as tall as Drew Brees.

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I figured the Cousins pick was just to make sure they had a backup if/when RGIII gets killed at some point in the season. Lord knows the other QBs on the roster weren't getting the job done.

As far as the Steelers picks go, they addressed pretty much all of their major needs. If the top two picks end up anywhere close to their potential, the o-line just went from a severe weakness to one of the top lines in the AFC. I was watching video of DeCastro, and he was just blowing guys up left and right. Multiple times he'd blow up a D lineman and then go blow up an LB on the same play. If you were going to create the ideal Steelers lineman in a lab, it'd be this guy. I don't see anything but injury keeping him from dominating.

Adams is a worry due to his off field issues, but he did go to Steelers management after failing the drug test at the combine and apologize for what he thought at the time was blowing his chance to be a Steeler (he grew up a fan). They seemed impressed that he would own up to his mistake, but I guarantee he's on a short leash since they have a history of not messing around with guys who have issues. One big difference though, is knuckleheads like Holmes seemed unrepentant and at least Adams seems to realize he already used his fuck-up card and can't afford another incident.

Spence is the one pick I'm not sure of. Like Voo said, he seems like a faster Larry Foote, but he gets spun around like a top at the line quite a bit. Steelers LBs tend to either be dominating or meh, with little in between. Time will tell on this guy.

Ta'Amu seems like a Polynesian Big Snack, and considering the key to the defensive scheme is having a big fat guy clog up the middle, he seems like an ideal pick. I know the NFL Network guys were joking about him not being a pass rusher (his 40 time was nearly 6), but his job here will be just to suck up o-linemen into his gravity field.

I thought for sure one thing they would have done, especially since they had 3 seventh round picks, would be to grab a fullback at some point. The last few years they've been using backup TE's as fullbacks and it really hasn't been working all that great. The team (all the way up to Dan Rooney himself) has gone on record wanting to go back to Steeler style running, and that was always having an actual FB block for your runner. Unless they pick up someone as a FA, look for another season of having backup TE's getting schooled by linebackers.

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Benlen wrote: Papa Voo wrote:

Benlen wrote: Papa Voo wrote:
I still think it was a stupid pick with all the needs on that team.  I would gamble on lightning in the bottle in regards to lineman or even a linebacker for special teams. 

They are going to want a a veteran backing up RG3.  You do not want two rookies on the depth chart back to back.  At best, Cousins becomes somewhat oriented with the NFL and moves on after his contract. 

I still do not get it.  They can twist anyway that they want it; it was ridiculous pick for this year.

I agree. There was no QB chosen until 81 picks later. Kellen Moore was never drafted and I think he's better than Cousins.Redskins aren't good enough to draft a clipboard holder in the 4th round .

I was sort of shocked that Moore was not drafted. 

I was surprised to hear all commentators and analysts rip on Moore so bad.  I did not know that he did so bad in the quarterback drills.  They basically said he is not athletic at all.  They said he understand the game and has a nice touch with his passes, but he is not very mobile and is clumsy and awkward.

Does anybody feel that he will be a good NFL QB?  Most already wrote him off as a player and think he will be a great coach. Anybody have any opinions on him?

The only knock on him that I heard is he's undersized but he's as tall as Drew Brees.

The ESPN crew, all of them, talked about Moore for a good 5 minutes at the end of the draft and everything was mostly negative related to athleticism.

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sek69 wrote: I figured the Cousins pick was just to make sure they had a backup if/when RGIII gets killed at some point in the season. Lord knows the other QBs on the roster weren't getting the job done.

As far as the Steelers picks go, they addressed pretty much all of their major needs. If the top two picks end up anywhere close to their potential, the o-line just went from a severe weakness to one of the top lines in the AFC. I was watching video of DeCastro, and he was just blowing guys up left and right. Multiple times he'd blow up a D lineman and then go blow up an LB on the same play. If you were going to create the ideal Steelers lineman in a lab, it'd be this guy. I don't see anything but injury keeping him from dominating.

Adams is a worry due to his off field issues, but he did go to Steelers management after failing the drug test at the combine and apologize for what he thought at the time was blowing his chance to be a Steeler (he grew up a fan). They seemed impressed that he would own up to his mistake, but I guarantee he's on a short leash since they have a history of not messing around with guys who have issues. One big difference though, is knuckleheads like Holmes seemed unrepentant and at least Adams seems to realize he already used his fuck-up card and can't afford another incident.

Spence is the one pick I'm not sure of. Like Voo said, he seems like a faster Larry Foote, but he gets spun around like a top at the line quite a bit. Steelers LBs tend to either be dominating or meh, with little in between. Time will tell on this guy.

Ta'Amu seems like a Polynesian Big Snack, and considering the key to the defensive scheme is having a big fat guy clog up the middle, he seems like an ideal pick. I know the NFL Network guys were joking about him not being a pass rusher (his 40 time was nearly 6), but his job here will be just to suck up o-linemen into his gravity field.

I thought for sure one thing they would have done, especially since they had 3 seventh round picks, would be to grab a fullback at some point. The last few years they've been using backup TE's as fullbacks and it really hasn't been working all that great. The team (all the way up to Dan Rooney himself) has gone on record wanting to go back to Steeler style running, and that was always having an actual FB block for your runner. Unless they pick up someone as a FA, look for another season of having backup TE's getting schooled by linebackers.

sek, Toney Clemons went to Valley High School.  I saw him play around 4-5 times. He was a fortified prima donna during his senior year.  He even walked off the team at one point.  Then, he got into a bad situation at Michigan with Rich Rod and felt he was not being utilized correctly and transferred to Colorado. 

Hopefully, he has matured and has lost some of his feelings of entitlement.  He has the size and speed.  His hands are also suspect. 

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I always thought that drafts are supposed to be measured 5-10 years after the fact since none of these guys have played a game yet so I never understood why analysts give a draft grade the night after a draft.

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silentkiller wrote: I always thought that drafts are supposed to be measured 5-10 years after the fact since none of these guys have played a game yet so I never understood why analysts give a draft grade the night after a draft.
Because people read those articles.

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DaNkinator wrote: Papa Voo wrote: Nobody has commented on this thread about the Redskins selecting QB Kirk Cousins.  It seems like the story is red hot in Washington, DC.  What would you think if you were EG3 and the Redskins use a luxury pick on a QB like Cousins while they have pressing needs throughout the team.  I just watched the press conference of RG3 addressing the Washington DC reporters for the first time and one of the first questions dealt with the drafting of Cousins. I think it is a ridiculous pick.

I don't think so.

He was drafted 102nd overall, in the 4th round. That's not a high pick. That's a backup pick. And that's exactly why they drafted him. He's not going to be challenging RGIII for a job. There's a reason he fell out of the top 100, and this is why. Grossman, more than likely won't be around after this year, so it only makes sense to have a decent backup when he's gone. They used this pick wisely.

And it's not like that pick would have been used wisely elsewhere. Anyone else drafted there would likely be a reserve as well, so why not do it for the most valued position on the team?

Seems a lot of people are calling this a dumb pick or a luxury pick.  Rosenthal said it best when he said that the Redskins believe Cousins can be a good BACKUP QB.  Those aren't a luxury in the NFL, they're a requirement.

The Redskins remember 1994, when Gus Frerotte ended up being a better QB than Heath Shuler.  

Papa Voo



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silentkiller wrote: I always thought that drafts are supposed to be measured 5-10 years after the fact since none of these guys have played a game yet so I never understood why analysts give a draft grade the night after a draft.

The draft classes are graded on assessed value. 

BayouBoogie



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tofu_chipmunk wrote:
DaNkinator wrote: Papa Voo wrote: Nobody has commented on this thread about the Redskins selecting QB Kirk Cousins.  It seems like the story is red hot in Washington, DC.  What would you think if you were EG3 and the Redskins use a luxury pick on a QB like Cousins while they have pressing needs throughout the team.  I just watched the press conference of RG3 addressing the Washington DC reporters for the first time and one of the first questions dealt with the drafting of Cousins. I think it is a ridiculous pick.

I don't think so.

He was drafted 102nd overall, in the 4th round. That's not a high pick. That's a backup pick. And that's exactly why they drafted him. He's not going to be challenging RGIII for a job. There's a reason he fell out of the top 100, and this is why. Grossman, more than likely won't be around after this year, so it only makes sense to have a decent backup when he's gone. They used this pick wisely.

And it's not like that pick would have been used wisely elsewhere. Anyone else drafted there would likely be a reserve as well, so why not do it for the most valued position on the team?

Seems a lot of people are calling this a dumb pick or a luxury pick.  Rosenthal said it best when he said that the Redskins believe Cousins can be a good BACKUP QB.  Those aren't a luxury in the NFL, they're a requirement.

The Redskins remember 1994, when Gus Frerotte ended up being a better QB than Heath Shuler.  


That's exactly what I was thinking.

DaNkinator



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Yep, there's that too.

Again, always good to have an insurance policy.

Road Warrior Yajuta



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silentkiller wrote: I always thought that drafts are supposed to be measured 5-10 years after the fact since none of these guys have played a game yet so I never understood why analysts give a draft grade the night after a draft.I was recently rereading some of my old Lindy's NFL magazines.  One of the things they do is a draft recap.  It was interesting to see how many guys from later rounds made nice careers for themselves and how many pundits were wrong on many bigger names.  Meaning you are spot on.  I think three years is good enough.  Odds are if a guy has not made much of an impact by then odds are he never will. 

HBF



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Bump for the Trent Richardson draft, which is funny now that I called it the worst move of the night but had no idea he would ever be as bad as he is.



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