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 Posted: Wed Jul 17th, 2013 02:12 pm
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yellowdog



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TerryWWWF wrote: Tons of classic Steve & Garry available for free download here:

http://stevegarry.shorturl.com/

Get them fast, though. Steve is marketing the archives via his paid podcasts, and he had a similar free vault shut down.

thanks for this Terry.  All of my S&G stuff is 1986 and later.  Some good early stuff here.



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 Posted: Tue Jul 12th, 2016 05:27 pm
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lobo316



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37 years ago today - July 12 1079





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 Posted: Wed Jul 13th, 2016 01:53 am
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HBF



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RIP to Claw



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 Posted: Wed Jul 13th, 2016 02:20 am
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tamalie
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Regarding the movement of the R&B charts towards disco, as far back as the early 1970s, you can look at what records were selling, what radio stations were playing, listen to the production of the hit songs, and both see and hear where the genre was going. Things were getting very smoothed out compared to say where things were circa the mid to late 1960s. Motown and Stax were on the way down. Philadelphia International was on the way up with many new indy labels following. It was a new world. I agree with preferring the old.

As far as the event at Comiskey Park goes, apart from crowds being wilder back then, security then compared to now was a complete joke. Can you even imagine things at a sporting event being allowed to get that far out of hand? The crowd was clearly beyond the ushers and security before the record explosion and field invasion took place. Even nowadays at concerts, you hear about the occasional incident, but complete lawlessness at concerts back then seems to have been closer to the norm than the current exception. It was also customary for fans to enter the field after a big win and run riot. You get college football fans coming on the field to celebrate now in an exuberant, but peaceful manner. However, the destruction of the field, assault of the players, and so forth is largely a thing of the past.

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 Posted: Wed Jul 13th, 2016 05:44 am
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TerryWWWF



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There's a book about Disco Demolition coming out this month.

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 Posted: Wed Jul 13th, 2016 07:44 am
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Blazer
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I pretty much listened to Steve & Garry every day through my high school years *86 to 90*, along with Brandmeier and Kevin Matthews. Kinda grew out of Steve after they split, but those late 80s days were incredible radio. I was too young to be in the demographic that would have gone to Disco Demolition in '79, and a Sox fan I hated it, but I grew to love Dahl later. Actually I became introduced to them on the radio after hearing one of their "rebroadcasts" during summer break 30 years ago. They used to rebroadcast the afternoon show from midnight to 5:30am, so I started listening to the rebroadcasts when I would stay up late during summer (no job) and later started listening to the afternoon live shows. Good times back then.

Last edited on Wed Jul 13th, 2016 07:44 am by Blazer



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 Posted: Wed Jul 13th, 2016 07:49 am
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Blazer
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tamalie wrote: Regarding the movement of the R&B charts towards disco, as far back as the early 1970s, you can look at what records were selling, what radio stations were playing, listen to the production of the hit songs, and both see and hear where the genre was going. Things were getting very smoothed out compared to say where things were circa the mid to late 1960s. Motown and Stax were on the way down. Philadelphia International was on the way up with many new indy labels following. It was a new world. I agree with preferring the old.

As far as the event at Comiskey Park goes, apart from crowds being wilder back then, security then compared to now was a complete joke. Can you even imagine things at a sporting event being allowed to get that far out of hand? The crowd was clearly beyond the ushers and security before the record explosion and field invasion took place. Even nowadays at concerts, you hear about the occasional incident, but complete lawlessness at concerts back then seems to have been closer to the norm than the current exception. It was also customary for fans to enter the field after a big win and run riot. You get college football fans coming on the field to celebrate now in an exuberant, but peaceful manner. However, the destruction of the field, assault of the players, and so forth is largely a thing of the past.


It is really a cultural phenomenon that is fascinating to look at.  I remember watching the end of Game 7 of the World Series in 1980 and seeing horses and mounted police along the warning track at the Vet in Phily.  It was almost unheard of not to see the fans rush the field and attack the players and steal their hats/bases/etc, although it happened much less when a road team won.  I think Chris Chambliss almost got killed when he hit the homer to win the AL pennant for the Yankees in '76 (?).  Detroit and the Mets were a mess in '84 and '86.  Trying to remember the first time a World Series didn't end in chaos.  How did the '87 Series end at the HHH Dome when the Twins won?  If not '87, then '88 was the Dodgers beating the A's....I think that was peaceful.  By the early 90s, they had things under control (Toronto and Joe Carter in '93).



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"Well, maybe I like the nightlife just a little bit more than I like the damn gym, jack! And when you're makin' $500,000 a year, there ain't no reason to change what you're doing." - Dusty Rhodes, 1/4/1986
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 Posted: Wed Jul 13th, 2016 07:55 am
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Chitown Rich

 

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TerryWWWF wrote: There's a book about Disco Demolition coming out this month.

There was a book signing last Friday with Dahl attending at 32nd and Morgan Street which is about two miles away from the ballpark. It drew a nice crowd. I didn't go but a friend did and he said Dahl was in a great mood and signed everything and took photos with people.
I was at Disco Demolition Night and will never forget it. It was a rowdy crowd but you never had to worry about getting beat up or anything. It wasn't that kind of crowd. The wife and I went and didn't expect anything like it.
Harry Caray and Bill Veeck pleaded with the crowd to leave the field but it took CPD marching in from the center field bullpen to disperse everything.

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 Posted: Thu Jul 14th, 2016 02:56 am
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Blazer
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I've seen footage of the riot police entering from behind home plate and making about a 150 ft line and walking straight towards centerfield, just clearing everyone the hell out of the way with their sticks.



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"Well, maybe I like the nightlife just a little bit more than I like the damn gym, jack! And when you're makin' $500,000 a year, there ain't no reason to change what you're doing." - Dusty Rhodes, 1/4/1986
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 Posted: Thu Jul 14th, 2016 03:30 am
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Chitown Rich

 

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Blazer wrote: I've seen footage of the riot police entering from behind home plate and making about a 150 ft line and walking straight towards centerfield, just clearing everyone the hell out of the way with their sticks.  Blazer,
I could have sworn they came in from the center field bullpen area and came toward home plate but that is by memory alone.If there's footage showing them coming in the other way then I stand corrected.
I also live three blocks from the park and I remember going home the people were getting fights with my neighbors because the ballpark goers were pissing all over the lawns and going in gangways and whatever.Those are stories for another day though.
Edit..
Blazer...you're right. I talked to other people about the police entering the field and they agree with you. They did not come in from center field like I thought.

Last edited on Thu Jul 14th, 2016 07:50 pm by Chitown Rich

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 Posted: Sat Jul 16th, 2016 08:33 am
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tamalie
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Blazer wrote: tamalie wrote: Regarding the movement of the R&B charts towards disco, as far back as the early 1970s, you can look at what records were selling, what radio stations were playing, listen to the production of the hit songs, and both see and hear where the genre was going. Things were getting very smoothed out compared to say where things were circa the mid to late 1960s. Motown and Stax were on the way down. Philadelphia International was on the way up with many new indy labels following. It was a new world. I agree with preferring the old.

As far as the event at Comiskey Park goes, apart from crowds being wilder back then, security then compared to now was a complete joke. Can you even imagine things at a sporting event being allowed to get that far out of hand? The crowd was clearly beyond the ushers and security before the record explosion and field invasion took place. Even nowadays at concerts, you hear about the occasional incident, but complete lawlessness at concerts back then seems to have been closer to the norm than the current exception. It was also customary for fans to enter the field after a big win and run riot. You get college football fans coming on the field to celebrate now in an exuberant, but peaceful manner. However, the destruction of the field, assault of the players, and so forth is largely a thing of the past.


It is really a cultural phenomenon that is fascinating to look at.  I remember watching the end of Game 7 of the World Series in 1980 and seeing horses and mounted police along the warning track at the Vet in Phily.  It was almost unheard of not to see the fans rush the field and attack the players and steal their hats/bases/etc, although it happened much less when a road team won.  I think Chris Chambliss almost got killed when he hit the homer to win the AL pennant for the Yankees in '76 (?).  Detroit and the Mets were a mess in '84 and '86.  Trying to remember the first time a World Series didn't end in chaos.  How did the '87 Series end at the HHH Dome when the Twins won?  If not '87, then '88 was the Dodgers beating the A's....I think that was peaceful.  By the early 90s, they had things under control (Toronto and Joe Carter in '93).

The Twins World Series triumph in 1987 was pure "Minnesota Nice". After the final out in Game Seven, the crowd stayed in its seats, cheering and applauding at decibel levels associated with 747s at takeoff, but there was no invasion of the field. Outside afterward people were highfiving, cheering, chanting, honking car horns for joy, and generally acting bonkers, but there was no riot or destruction of property. The same thing happened after the 1991 World Series win.

The second Chris Chambliss' homerun disappeared over the fence at Yankee Stadium to win the 1976 ALCS, fans were streaming onto the field from all directions. You have to wonder if the NYPD was unprepared or maybe just didn't care due to the disputes it had been having with the city, which less two weeks earlier had seen the cops let thugs run riot in and around Yankee Stadium before, during, and after the Muhammad Ali-Ken Norton fight as part of an effort by the police union to say "look what happens when we aren't around". Little effort was made to contain the crowd at the Yankees game until it was well out of control. After the fans were cleared out and the stadium emptied, Chambliss and the umpires went out to the field and he reran the bases to touch em all since he hadn't been able to due to the fans and everyone wanted to make his homerun official.

Last edited on Sat Jul 16th, 2016 08:41 am by tamalie

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 Posted: Wed Jul 20th, 2016 07:18 pm
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tamalie wrote: The second Chris Chambliss' homerun disappeared over the fence at Yankee Stadium to win the 1976 ALCS, fans were streaming onto the field from all directions. You have to wonder if the NYPD was unprepared or maybe just didn't care due to the disputes it had been having with the city, which less two weeks earlier had seen the cops let thugs run riot in and around Yankee Stadium before, during, and after the Muhammad Ali-Ken Norton fight as part of an effort by the police union to say "look what happens when we aren't around". Little effort was made to contain the crowd at the Yankees game until it was well out of control. After the fans were cleared out and the stadium emptied, Chambliss and the umpires went out to the field and he reran the bases to touch em all since he hadn't been able to due to the fans and everyone wanted to make his homerun official.

NY in 1976 was pretty much chaos.  Fans running onto a baseball field was really the least of the problems.  I imagine the cops were stretched beyond capacity in other areas and were doing the bare minimum there.  I've seen the clip a million times and there are a handful of cops just milling around staying out of the way.  They couldn't exactly do anything anyway with that outpouring of about 1,000 from the stands.  It's one of those clips I love watching though because it's a real, unscripted, visceral reaction of pure joy, something that simply can't happen today and never will again because everything is so controlled and over-policed.  No one got hurt and no one had bad intentions.  They just fucked up the field a bit.  But visually it's a beautiful moment. 

The one that always gets me is the fan who runs alongside Aaron during his record-breaking home run trot.  Given that Aaron was receiving hate mail from people who said they would kill him if he broke the record, it's almost impossible to think that the first reaction of Aaron and everyone watching wouldn't be that this fan meant harm.  And yet no one stops him and even Aaron himself doesn't seem particularly alarmed.  The racial tensions were a million times more charged then than now, and yet everyone was peaceful and no one got shot or even tackled.  I believe I read that the fan did spend the night in jail though once he was rounded up.   

Last edited on Wed Jul 20th, 2016 07:19 pm by srossi



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 Posted: Fri Jul 22nd, 2016 08:42 am
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tamalie
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It was actually two fans that jumped onto the field with Hank Aaron. They were friends, both 17 at the time. They got bailed out later that night and the charges were dropped the next day. Aaron was a bit unnerved to see them at first, but apparently relaxed after realizing they meant no harm. He met with them a few years ago and it was a very warm reunion.

On one hand the cops in New York were overstretched in 1976, but the act of fans running on the field and the cops doing nothing to stop it goes back well before then and in cities that didn't face such social and economic trouble either. Concerts back then had a certain lawless vibe to them as well. On one hand it was a case of truly unbridled emotion, but fans could and did get hurt, even if the injuries were minor. The Detroit Tigers World Series riot of 1984, which admittedly took place largely outside the venue, was more or less the nadir. I think it had to come to an end before things got further out of hand and injuries worse than a concussion or a shiner happened.

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 Posted: Fri Jul 22nd, 2016 09:50 am
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Blazer
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Chitown Rich wrote: Blazer wrote: I've seen footage of the riot police entering from behind home plate and making about a 150 ft line and walking straight towards centerfield, just clearing everyone the hell out of the way with their sticks.  Blazer,
I could have sworn they came in from the center field bullpen area and came toward home plate but that is by memory alone.If there's footage showing them coming in the other way then I stand corrected.
I also live three blocks from the park and I remember going home the people were getting fights with my neighbors because the ballpark goers were pissing all over the lawns and going in gangways and whatever.Those are stories for another day though.
Edit..
Blazer...you're right. I talked to other people about the police entering the field and they agree with you. They did not come in from center field like I thought.


I saw some footage on the WTTW special that aired in 2004 (25th anniversary) of the police coming in from behind home plate and hopping over the wall and through the screen, so I know they at LEAST came in that way and started walking towards CF.  Looks like there is some misinformation or other accounts out there, as I just read a Chicago Magazine story today online that talks about the police coming in from CF.  Who knows.  Anyway, fun to talk about :)

Last edited on Fri Jul 22nd, 2016 09:51 am by Blazer



____________________
"Well, maybe I like the nightlife just a little bit more than I like the damn gym, jack! And when you're makin' $500,000 a year, there ain't no reason to change what you're doing." - Dusty Rhodes, 1/4/1986
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 Posted: Fri Jul 22nd, 2016 09:58 am
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Blazer
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srossi wrote: tamalie wrote: The second Chris Chambliss' homerun disappeared over the fence at Yankee Stadium to win the 1976 ALCS, fans were streaming onto the field from all directions. You have to wonder if the NYPD was unprepared or maybe just didn't care due to the disputes it had been having with the city, which less two weeks earlier had seen the cops let thugs run riot in and around Yankee Stadium before, during, and after the Muhammad Ali-Ken Norton fight as part of an effort by the police union to say "look what happens when we aren't around". Little effort was made to contain the crowd at the Yankees game until it was well out of control. After the fans were cleared out and the stadium emptied, Chambliss and the umpires went out to the field and he reran the bases to touch em all since he hadn't been able to due to the fans and everyone wanted to make his homerun official.

NY in 1976 was pretty much chaos.  Fans running onto a baseball field was really the least of the problems.  I imagine the cops were stretched beyond capacity in other areas and were doing the bare minimum there.  I've seen the clip a million times and there are a handful of cops just milling around staying out of the way.  They couldn't exactly do anything anyway with that outpouring of about 1,000 from the stands.  It's one of those clips I love watching though because it's a real, unscripted, visceral reaction of pure joy, something that simply can't happen today and never will again because everything is so controlled and over-policed.  No one got hurt and no one had bad intentions.  They just fucked up the field a bit.  But visually it's a beautiful moment. 

The one that always gets me is the fan who runs alongside Aaron during his record-breaking home run trot.  Given that Aaron was receiving hate mail from people who said they would kill him if he broke the record, it's almost impossible to think that the first reaction of Aaron and everyone watching wouldn't be that this fan meant harm.  And yet no one stops him and even Aaron himself doesn't seem particularly alarmed.  The racial tensions were a million times more charged then than now, and yet everyone was peaceful and no one got shot or even tackled.  I believe I read that the fan did spend the night in jail though once he was rounded up.   

This is bizarre that I'm going to recommend a book to YOU, as usually it's the other way around.  Check out "The Last Hero", the story of Aaron's life.   Aaron's bodyguard had a loaded gun with him in the stands that night, hidden in his binocular case.  He made the snap decision not to get it out and shoot (from a distance, no doubt), and everything ended well.  Could have been ugly though.



____________________
"Well, maybe I like the nightlife just a little bit more than I like the damn gym, jack! And when you're makin' $500,000 a year, there ain't no reason to change what you're doing." - Dusty Rhodes, 1/4/1986
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