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Rest In Peace George Scott  Rating:  Rating
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 Posted: Tue Jan 21st, 2014 12:06 pm
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clawmaster



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Former wrestler and booker George Scott died yesterday.



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 Posted: Tue Jan 21st, 2014 01:45 pm
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Road Warrior Yajuta



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Never saw him wrestle though they say he was good. No denying he was a hell of a booker.



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 Posted: Tue Jan 21st, 2014 02:04 pm
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CW Hall

 

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His work with brother Sandy as the "Flying Scott's" was excellent. They had some outstanding matches against Hawk/Hanson, the Andersons, Bogni/Lubich, Murphy/Bernard and many others. RIP.

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 Posted: Tue Jan 21st, 2014 02:14 pm
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Portalesman
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Didn't he have a 3 way butt sex with Harley Race and Tommy Rich so he could book the world champ in Atlanta?



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 Posted: Tue Jan 21st, 2014 02:15 pm
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Qaenos

 

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Wasn't George Scott the WWF booker during Vince's early expansion?  Didn't he also book other territories like Mid-Atlantic and Georgia during some of their hottest periods?

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 Posted: Tue Jan 21st, 2014 02:26 pm
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bpickering



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pwinsider.com

George Scott, who wrestling extensively in the Carolinas before becoming the booker for Mid-Atlantic Wrestling, the the WWF, the early era of WCW and World Class Championship Wrestling passed away yesterday. He was 85 at the time of his passing.

Although born in Scotland, Scott grew in Ontario, Canada and began training for the business in his late teens. Local territory stars Mike and Ben Sharpe were neighbors and that became Scott's in into the business, making his professional debut at the age of just 17.

Scott was an up and coming babyface working in several territories in the United States and Canada early in his career until suffering several herniated discs during a bout with Buddy Rogers, often credited to a stiff kick Rogers gave him.

Scott was told surgery was the easiest option but it would have likely ended his career, so he chose not to do the surgery, putting him out of the ring for a long period of time.

Scott would eventually return to the ring and became a top draw for Stu Hart's Stampede Wrestling in the 1950s, breaking his brother Angus into the business. Angus, known professionally as Sandy Scott, and George were quickly christened the Flying Scotts, feuding with The Vachons and the Tolos Brothers over the promotion's NWA Canadian Tag Team Championship. The duo were a huge draw for the promotion at the time.

When the brothers had a legitimate fallout of a family matter, George headed to Texas and worked for the precursor of World Class Championship Wrestling, feuding with Johnny Valentine. The feud was kicked off by an angle where Valentine attacked Scott, ripped his clothes off and ran him into the ringpost, busting him open. Valentine, one to always lay it in, ended up legitimately hurting Scott to sell the angle, requiring a short hospital stay.

Scott would eventually return to Stampede as a singles competitor as well. During that return, Scott would begin to take part in the booking of the shows, showing an immediate aptitude for that aspect of the business. He would soon take a similar apprenticeship role while working for Jim Crockett Promotions. After suffering another neck injury in the early 1970s, Scott retired from the ring and began working exclusively on the creative side of professional wrestling.

When Jim Crockett Sr. passed away, he had decreed that John Rigley, his son-in-law, take over the promotion. Ringley would bring in Scott as the booker of Mid-Atlantic Wrestling. As it turned out, he would outlast Ringley in the promotion as Crockett's sons, Jim Jr. and David, soon assumed control under allegations that Rigley had strayed from his marriage to Francis Crockett.

At the time, Mid-Atlantic had been a promotion that built around tag team rivalries. Scott "broke down" the promotion in order to rebuild it around singles competitors. He brought in Johnny Valentine to build the promotion around and handpicked a young crop of talent from elsewhere including Ricky Steamboat, Paul Orndorff, Jimmy Snuka, Roddy Piper and Ric Flair.

It was Scott who booked the first Flair vs. Steamboat matches, a rivalry that would go on to become the measuring stick for great, athletic professional wrestling bouts. It was Scott who handed Piper a mic and made him the co-host of the program with Gordon Solie.

When Crockett bought into the Tunney family's promotion in Canada, Scott became a partner, allowing for international talent to come into The Crocketts territory and sending Flair, Steamboat, etc. to Toronto for the first time. This continued until Frank Tunney passed on, with his son Jack instead selling to Vince McMahon and becoming the figurehead President of the World Wrestling Federation. Scott sued Tunney for selling without his permission and eventually won a court judgment worth nearly $600,000.

Scott left Crockett Promotions in the early 1980s over a pay issue and bounced around for a bit, turning down an offer to become a partner in what was designed to be the first legitimately national promotion, Eddie Einhorn's International Wrestling Association. Scott looked into buying into several different NWA territories at the time, including Oklahoma.

Then WWF came calling. It was 1983 and Vince McMahon was poised to take over the wrestling world. Vince McMahon Sr. had just sold his promotion to his son and called Scott to assist Vince Jr. Scott signed on and was involved in the WWE buyout of Georgia Championship Wrestling and Stampede Wrestling, the latter of which was later rescinded.

Scott also began promoting local events for WWF in Florida and recognizing his talents, Vince Jr. brought him on to help book the promotion. He was heavily involved in the booking of the first Wrestlemania and with negotiating with Mr. T and others who came on board to work the show. Steamboat, considered one of Scott's proteges, was soon hired by the company as well.

As the WWF business began to change towards more spectacle and campiness, Scott became disenfranchised with the direction. He and Hulk Hogan had issues at one point over backstage etiquette and visitors. Scott at the time became concerned about the drug use by talent in the company and had pushed for testing as well as for a tighter locker room, feeling that the wrestlers, amped up by their fame, were allowing the wrong crowd into the locker rooms. Hogan was THE man at that point and when he complained about it to Vince McMahon, Scott lost political points.

Scott's arguments also fell on deaf ears when he fought against the presentation of the WWF Saturday Night's Main Event specials, feeling they were silly and exposed the business, as opposed to treated the industry with respect. When the ratings came in, he lost more power as the hard numbers showed that the direction Vince McMahon and NBC's Dick Ebersol wanted was the right one, at least in the moment when it came to ratings.

Scott warned McMahon the direction could kill the business by exposing it and when McMahon chose not to listen to him, Scott quit, citing the stress and the workload of a national promotion. He had come from a world where the promoter let the booker have the final word, but in WWF, Vince was the final word and Scott exited.

In many ways, Scott's been forgotten by WWE history, as he is rarely acknowledged and was never called upon by WWE to take part in historical interviews or features. With his passing, a lesson that should be learned here by WWE is to reach out to older talents who might have deep insight into the unique cornerstones of the business so their views and memories can be recorded for future use on projects.

Scott bounced around booking a number of different promotions, including a short run in World Class Championship Wrestling.

When Ted Turner purchased Crockett Promotions, Dusty Rhodes was removed as the booker of what was now WCW (although still referred to as the National Wrestling Alliance at the time). Scott was brought in as the booker and went right back to what he knew best, luring Ricky Steamboat out of retirement as a mystery partner with Eddie Gilbert against Ric Flair and Barry Windham. Flair was pinned by Steamboat with a flying bodypress and the two rivals were back off to the races.

The two would have a trilogy of matches, two on PPV and one live on a Clash of Champions special that was opposite Wrestlemania V, that would become the measuring stick. Unfortunately for Scott, he would be gone by the time the program was concluded. When it came time for the Clash to be promoted, Scott downplayed the fact it would be airing live on TBS, feeling that the company giving away its best matches would kill the live house shows. His outlook made logical sense but it was a different era where the TV ratings for a promotion owned by a cable network were just as, if not more important. It was Scott's miscalculation that ended up with him being removed and replaced by a booking committee of Ric Flair, Jim Cornette, Kevin Sullivan and more, kicking off a great 1989 for WCW, at least in terms of match quality and angles.

Scott would eventually promote The Carolinas under the South Atlantic Pro Wrestling (SAPW) banner before retiring to Florida.

Scott would make a few rare appearances in the business from time to time, including the annual Charlotte Fanfest, but for the most part had left the business behind.

Scott had been in ill health for some time before his passing.

On behalf of everyone associated with PWInsider.com, I'd like to express our deepest condolences to the family, friends and fans of George Scott.



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PRO WRESTLING HALL OF FAME: http://www.angelfire.com/pa5/old (updated March 28 2014)
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 Posted: Tue Jan 21st, 2014 02:33 pm
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the squared circle



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RIP

When Crockett bought into the Tunney family's promotion in Canada, Scott became a partner, allowing for international talent to come into The Crocketts territory and sending Flair, Steamboat, etc. to Toronto for the first time. This continued until Frank Tunney passed on, with his son Jack instead selling to Vince McMahon and becoming the figurehead President of the World Wrestling Federation. Scott sued Tunney for selling without his permission and eventually won a court judgment worth nearly $600,000.

--- Wow, thats big money today, huge at that time

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 Posted: Tue Jan 21st, 2014 03:28 pm
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freebirdsforever2001



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He was a helluva booker



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 Posted: Tue Jan 21st, 2014 03:41 pm
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khawk
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Portalesman wrote: Didn't he have a 3 way butt sex with Harley Race and Tommy Rich so he could book the world champ in Atlanta?
**sigh**

That was Barnett.



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 Posted: Tue Jan 21st, 2014 03:57 pm
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CW Hall

 

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bpickering wrote: pwinsider.com

George Scott, who wrestling extensively in the Carolinas before becoming the booker for Mid-Atlantic Wrestling, the the WWF, the early era of WCW and World Class Championship Wrestling passed away yesterday. He was 85 at the time of his passing.

Although born in Scotland, Scott grew in Ontario, Canada and began training for the business in his late teens. Local territory stars Mike and Ben Sharpe were neighbors and that became Scott's in into the business, making his professional debut at the age of just 17.

Scott was an up and coming babyface working in several territories in the United States and Canada early in his career until suffering several herniated discs during a bout with Buddy Rogers, often credited to a stiff kick Rogers gave him.

Scott was told surgery was the easiest option but it would have likely ended his career, so he chose not to do the surgery, putting him out of the ring for a long period of time.

Scott would eventually return to the ring and became a top draw for Stu Hart's Stampede Wrestling in the 1950s, breaking his brother Angus into the business. Angus, known professionally as Sandy Scott, and George were quickly christened the Flying Scotts, feuding with The Vachons and the Tolos Brothers over the promotion's NWA Canadian Tag Team Championship. The duo were a huge draw for the promotion at the time.

When the brothers had a legitimate fallout of a family matter, George headed to Texas and worked for the precursor of World Class Championship Wrestling, feuding with Johnny Valentine. The feud was kicked off by an angle where Valentine attacked Scott, ripped his clothes off and ran him into the ringpost, busting him open. Valentine, one to always lay it in, ended up legitimately hurting Scott to sell the angle, requiring a short hospital stay.

Scott would eventually return to Stampede as a singles competitor as well. During that return, Scott would begin to take part in the booking of the shows, showing an immediate aptitude for that aspect of the business. He would soon take a similar apprenticeship role while working for Jim Crockett Promotions. After suffering another neck injury in the early 1970s, Scott retired from the ring and began working exclusively on the creative side of professional wrestling.

When Jim Crockett Sr. passed away, he had decreed that John Rigley, his son-in-law, take over the promotion. Ringley would bring in Scott as the booker of Mid-Atlantic Wrestling. As it turned out, he would outlast Ringley in the promotion as Crockett's sons, Jim Jr. and David, soon assumed control under allegations that Rigley had strayed from his marriage to Francis Crockett.

At the time, Mid-Atlantic had been a promotion that built around tag team rivalries. Scott "broke down" the promotion in order to rebuild it around singles competitors. He brought in Johnny Valentine to build the promotion around and handpicked a young crop of talent from elsewhere including Ricky Steamboat, Paul Orndorff, Jimmy Snuka, Roddy Piper and Ric Flair.

It was Scott who booked the first Flair vs. Steamboat matches, a rivalry that would go on to become the measuring stick for great, athletic professional wrestling bouts. It was Scott who handed Piper a mic and made him the co-host of the program with Gordon Solie.

When Crockett bought into the Tunney family's promotion in Canada, Scott became a partner, allowing for international talent to come into The Crocketts territory and sending Flair, Steamboat, etc. to Toronto for the first time. This continued until Frank Tunney passed on, with his son Jack instead selling to Vince McMahon and becoming the figurehead President of the World Wrestling Federation. Scott sued Tunney for selling without his permission and eventually won a court judgment worth nearly $600,000.

Scott left Crockett Promotions in the early 1980s over a pay issue and bounced around for a bit, turning down an offer to become a partner in what was designed to be the first legitimately national promotion, Eddie Einhorn's International Wrestling Association. Scott looked into buying into several different NWA territories at the time, including Oklahoma.

Then WWF came calling. It was 1983 and Vince McMahon was poised to take over the wrestling world. Vince McMahon Sr. had just sold his promotion to his son and called Scott to assist Vince Jr. Scott signed on and was involved in the WWE buyout of Georgia Championship Wrestling and Stampede Wrestling, the latter of which was later rescinded.

Scott also began promoting local events for WWF in Florida and recognizing his talents, Vince Jr. brought him on to help book the promotion. He was heavily involved in the booking of the first Wrestlemania and with negotiating with Mr. T and others who came on board to work the show. Steamboat, considered one of Scott's proteges, was soon hired by the company as well.

As the WWF business began to change towards more spectacle and campiness, Scott became disenfranchised with the direction. He and Hulk Hogan had issues at one point over backstage etiquette and visitors. Scott at the time became concerned about the drug use by talent in the company and had pushed for testing as well as for a tighter locker room, feeling that the wrestlers, amped up by their fame, were allowing the wrong crowd into the locker rooms. Hogan was THE man at that point and when he complained about it to Vince McMahon, Scott lost political points.

Scott's arguments also fell on deaf ears when he fought against the presentation of the WWF Saturday Night's Main Event specials, feeling they were silly and exposed the business, as opposed to treated the industry with respect. When the ratings came in, he lost more power as the hard numbers showed that the direction Vince McMahon and NBC's Dick Ebersol wanted was the right one, at least in the moment when it came to ratings.

Scott warned McMahon the direction could kill the business by exposing it and when McMahon chose not to listen to him, Scott quit, citing the stress and the workload of a national promotion. He had come from a world where the promoter let the booker have the final word, but in WWF, Vince was the final word and Scott exited.

In many ways, Scott's been forgotten by WWE history, as he is rarely acknowledged and was never called upon by WWE to take part in historical interviews or features. With his passing, a lesson that should be learned here by WWE is to reach out to older talents who might have deep insight into the unique cornerstones of the business so their views and memories can be recorded for future use on projects.

Scott bounced around booking a number of different promotions, including a short run in World Class Championship Wrestling.

When Ted Turner purchased Crockett Promotions, Dusty Rhodes was removed as the booker of what was now WCW (although still referred to as the National Wrestling Alliance at the time). Scott was brought in as the booker and went right back to what he knew best, luring Ricky Steamboat out of retirement as a mystery partner with Eddie Gilbert against Ric Flair and Barry Windham. Flair was pinned by Steamboat with a flying bodypress and the two rivals were back off to the races.

The two would have a trilogy of matches, two on PPV and one live on a Clash of Champions special that was opposite Wrestlemania V, that would become the measuring stick. Unfortunately for Scott, he would be gone by the time the program was concluded. When it came time for the Clash to be promoted, Scott downplayed the fact it would be airing live on TBS, feeling that the company giving away its best matches would kill the live house shows. His outlook made logical sense but it was a different era where the TV ratings for a promotion owned by a cable network were just as, if not more important. It was Scott's miscalculation that ended up with him being removed and replaced by a booking committee of Ric Flair, Jim Cornette, Kevin Sullivan and more, kicking off a great 1989 for WCW, at least in terms of match quality and angles.

Scott would eventually promote The Carolinas under the South Atlantic Pro Wrestling (SAPW) banner before retiring to Florida.

Scott would make a few rare appearances in the business from time to time, including the annual Charlotte Fanfest, but for the most part had left the business behind.

Scott had been in ill health for some time before his passing.

On behalf of everyone associated with PWInsider.com, I'd like to express our deepest condolences to the family, friends and fans of George Scott.
George Scott returned to North Carolina during the early part of 1973 before Jim Crockett Sr. passed away. George teamed once again with brother Sandy until around June 1973 before leaving again. It was in October 1973 that George appeared on tv  being announced as "NWA representative" or "matchmaker" depending on which show host he was being interviewed by.

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 Posted: Tue Jan 21st, 2014 04:20 pm
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GregOliver

 

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Confirmed with his family, with their quotes and information on his family and funeral: http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Wrestling/2014/01/21/21413481.html

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 Posted: Tue Jan 21st, 2014 05:25 pm
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LarrySC



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I saw him wrestle in the Carolinas in the latter part of his career. He was a big name in the business and a fantastic booker for many years. My condolences to his family and friends.

R.I.P. George Scott

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 Posted: Tue Jan 21st, 2014 08:08 pm
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carlton st

 

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paragraph on Scott and Toronto pretty much all wrong

will wait on Greg's obit * which I see above now tks

RIP

Last edited on Tue Jan 21st, 2014 08:09 pm by carlton st



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 Posted: Tue Jan 21st, 2014 10:34 pm
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Papa Voo



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Everything I have read about this guy makes me think he was one of the most creative minds the wrestling business has experienced.

Scott was very instrumental in promoting Piper as the No. 1 heel in Georgia and then the WWF. He was also thought to be the creator of pulling Orton in as Ace as Piper's bodyguard.

I do not think we will never know which angles and plots were his ideas. I am sure there are alot out there.

Scott was also probably a key cog in the expansion of the WWF. I think he was very influential with McMahon.

RIP George Scott

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