WowBB Forums Home 
WowBB Forums > Sports And Wrestling > Sports Talk > Boxing In The ‘80’s

 Moderated by: Ron, brodiescomics, beejmi  
AuthorPost
Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Boxing in the ‘80’s was probably the last decade that held my interest in boxing.

The welterweight and middleweight classes had some great boxers and some great match-ups.

I will try and post about a certain boxer and see if any others can contribute. 

Last edited on Mon Feb 18th, 2019 05:34 pm by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Wilfred Benitez 

Attachment: 5A47E170-ACB1-4A85-BC44-37421BC4477D.jpeg (Downloaded 53 times)

Last edited on Mon Feb 18th, 2019 05:36 pm by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Benitez is basically a vegetable now suffering from the symptoms of CTE.

https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-met-wilfred-benitez-health-chicago-20180615-story.html

I remember Benitez’s fight against Sugar Ray Leonard in which Leonard won and caltured the welterweight title. I believe that was on network television.

I was reading that Benitez had a very bad cocaine habit. I am not sure if this helped him or hurt him in the ring.

tamalie
Hall Of Famer
 

Joined: Mon Oct 22nd, 2007
Location:  
Posts: 4220
Status: 
Offline
The first half of the 1980s was a fun time to be a boxing fan because at least one, two or all three of CBS, NBC, and ABC usually had fights on their package shows over the course of a weekend; CBS Sports Saturday/CBS Sports Sunday, NBC Sportsworld, and ABC Wide World of Sports. The heavyweight division was considered down in the post Ali/pre Tyson era, but you could see plenty of action filled bouts with the lighter weight boxers beneath middle weight, especially after Sugar Ray Leonard retired and opened up the welterweight division. Ray Mancini, Alexis Arguello, Cornelius Boza-Edwards, Bazooka Limon, and Bobby Chacon were among the fighters. By the late 1980s that late 1970s to mid 1980s golden age was subsiding. The fighters who'd made that era so fun were either done or had graduated to fighting on HBO or CCTV as well as PPV. There were fewer fighters and fights that the networks could afford to show. The last real attempt at doing something like this was in the mid 1990s when CBS put some fights on due to losing the rights to the NFL, MLB, NBA, and NCAA Football, leaving it with a ton of airtime to fill. Even then, the number of quality fights and fighters was low while the general interest in boxing had dramatically declined.

Benlen



Joined: Sun Oct 21st, 2007
Location: Milpitas, California USA
Posts: 13079
Status: 
Offline
I use to play softball with a guy named David Vedder. He fought Twice for the lightweight championship. Both times against Jeff Harding and losing by decision. Last time I heard he was an exotic dancer in Philly.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
My memory is going on some of these things but, I think there was a tite fight between Vito Antuofermo and Marvin Hagler on that same card as the Benitez vs. Leonard match. If it was not on the same card, it was on the same type of network show.

Hagler had beaten up on Antuofermo, but the match either ended in a draw or victory decision to Antuofermo, I believe.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Antuofermo vs. Hagler 1979

Attachment: 3327B68B-255C-4E40-A25E-3786852D72EA.jpeg (Downloaded 48 times)

Last edited on Mon Feb 18th, 2019 08:28 pm by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline

The first Hagler vs Antuofermo match was November 30, 1979


When A Tie Is Better Than Kissing Your Sister


By Pat Putnam, Sports Illustrated

For Mills Lane, who refereed the brawling, bloody middleweight title fight which preceded the Leonard-Benitez bout at Caesars Palace, the outcome was as apparent as the many cuts on Vito Antuofermo's craggy face. Moving quickly to the corner of Marvin Hagler, Mills directed the challenger to turn and face the ABC-TV cameras. "Congratulations," Mills murmured. "Now stay facing this way until they announce the decision and I raise your arm."

Across the way, little Freddie Brown, the ancient cutman, was busily anointing Antuofermo's torn features with his magic wound solution. There were six cuts; 25 stitches would be required to close four of them.

"You win it in the last round," Brown rasped, working swiftly. He didn't want Vito--a 4--1 underdog in his first title defense--to be bleeding when they told him he was still champion.
But surely the referee and the bettors were right and Brown was not.

And then they read the astonishing decision:

Judge Dalby Shirley: 144--142 for Antuofermo.
Judge Duane Ford: 145--141 for Hagler.
And Judge Hal Miller: 143--143.
A draw. And draws go to the champion.

Last edited on Mon Feb 18th, 2019 08:27 pm by Papa Voo

khawk
Hall Of Famer


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Canada
Posts: 15423
Status: 
Offline
I enjoyed Boxing a ton back then, and even earlier in the 70's. I still watch occasionally these days when I come across it but it isn't the same...and I won't fork over 75 bucks for a PPV with guys I don't know in the featured bouts. That was what the network tv shows were the best for: getting to know a lot of these guys as they ascended to stardom.

With no HBO Boxing anymore, I don't see my interest expanding...or probably even holding the same level as it does now. The Showtime presentations are lousy IMO, and presentation is pretty huge for me as a now-casual fan.

Angelic Assassin



Joined: Mon Dec 27th, 2010
Location: Driving Through Philly, Home Of Losers., Pennsylvania USA
Posts: 5712
Status: 
Offline

Boxing in the 80's had many great fighters and many great fights and the late 70's with James Scott I think it was and the Rahway State Prison fights was something to behold. 
Sugar Ray Leonard vs. Roberto Duran " no mas" was fantastic drama IMO.
Now I can't even name 10 boxers total but back then I'd get The Ring and recognize dozens upon dozens of names in the rankings across all weight classes.
Much like in wrestling where in the 80's the Territories died Boxing as most of us who were fans then ceased to become the spectacle it once was.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Sugar Ray Leonard 





First world title Ray Leonard was a title bought against champion Wilfred Benitez. He fought Wilfred Benitez for the WBC Welterweight Championship on November 30, 1979, at Caeser’s Palace in Las Vegas, Nevada. There was a capacity crowd of about 4,600. Leonard received $1 million and Benitez, a two-division champion with a record of 38–0–1, received $1.2 million.

It was a highly competitive and tactical battle. In the first round, Leonard rocked Benitez with a left hook that came off a jab and right cross. Late in the third, Leonard dropped Benitez on the seat of his pants with a stiff left jab. More embarrassed than hurt, Benitez got up quickly. Benitez started improving in the fourth, slipping numerous punches and finding the range with his right hand. "I wasn't aware I was in a championship early because I hit him so easy", Leonard said. "But then he adjusted to my style. It was like looking in a mirror".

In the sixth, there was an accidental clash of heads, which opened a cut on the forehead of Benitez. Blood flowed down his forehead and the bridge of his nose but stayed out of his eyes.

Leonard landed the harder punches and had Benitez hurt several times late in the fight, but Leonard couldn't put him away. Benitez was very slick. "No one, I mean no one, can make me miss punches like that", Leonard said.

Going into the final round, Leonard led by scores of 137–130, 137–133, and 136–134. The two went toe-to-toe in the fifteenth. Late in the round, Leonard dropped Benitez with a left. He got up, but after a few more punches, the referee stopped the fight. The time was 2:54 of round fifteen.

The Boxing Writers Association of America and The Ring named Leonard "Fighter of the Year" for 1979.




Attachment: 60767C05-37AE-452E-8278-D4B270F86AB2.jpeg (Downloaded 43 times)

Last edited on Mon Feb 18th, 2019 11:41 pm by Papa Voo

khawk
Hall Of Famer


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Canada
Posts: 15423
Status: 
Offline
I was never a Ray Leonard fan, even as a kid I rooted against him right from the first time I saw him. His draw the second time around vs Hearns and his robbery of Hagler just solidified in my head that he was protected.

Imagine a fight between him and Floyd Mayweather. God I'd hope for an earthquake to swallow up the ring before a decision was rendered lol...

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
LOL

I also was not a Ray Leonard fan. I was rooting for Benitez in their bout.

Leonard’s comeback was disgusting. There was almost nothing that could stop them from creating their “boxing marketing” champion.

One Fan Gang



Joined: Wed Apr 22nd, 2009
Location:  
Posts: 4472
Status: 
Online
I enjoyed Marvin Johnson, Alfredo Escalera and Bump City Bumphus, off the top of my head. I recall a big to-do about Tyrell Biggs going from amateur to pro. And seeing Warren Zevon perform "Boom Boom Mancini" always stirs up these old memories.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Marvin Johnson



Attachment: 013A4B57-F262-4337-99AB-708EC200A100.jpeg (Downloaded 38 times)

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Alfredo Escalara





Attachment: 05CE4A2D-778F-40F0-9EED-64BE47849C98.jpeg (Downloaded 37 times)

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Johnny “Bump City” Bumphus 


Dubbed "Bump City", Bumphus began his professional career as a hot prospect, winning his first 22 fights, including the Vacant WBA Light Welterweight Title with a decision win over Lorenzo Luis Garcia in 1984. Bumphus lost the belt to Gene Hatcher in June 1984 in Buffalo, New York. Hatcher scored an 11th-round technical knockout that had Hatcher knocking Bumphus down, then slipping and falling on a follow-up attempt, then throwing Bumphus down to the mat when both fighters clinched. A post-fight melee in the ring then ensued, as Hatcher was celebrating in triumph while the now-deposed champion was slugging away in frustration. The fight was named as Ring magazine's Upset of the Year for 1984. In 1987, Bumphus took on Lloyd Honeghann for the WBC and IBF Welterweight Title, but lost with 2nd round technical knock out. He retired after the loss, with a record of 29-2-0.Those in Tacoma's Hilltop area knew of the lure drugs had for Bumphus. Towards the end of his boxing career he developed an addiction to cocaine, which he briefly kicked. When he returned to Tacoma, through a series of bad friends and choices, he resumed taking drugs in 1989, becoming addicted to crack cocaine. In 1995, he spent a year in rehab, and then left Tacoma to work as a trainer for his former manager Lou Duva in West Palm Beach, Florida.

As a trainer, he has worked with Kassim Ouma and Emmett Linton.

Bumphus qualified at 139 pounds and was a member of the 1980 U.S. Olympic boxing team that died in the crash of LOT Polish Airlines Flight 007 in WarsawPoland, on 14 March 1980 en route to the USA vs. Poland Box-off as part of "USA vs. the World" event. Bumphus was not with the team. Among the USA Boxing teammates who were killed in the crash were Lemuel Steeples from St. Louis, Calvin Anderson from Connecticut, Paul Palomino - the brother of Carlos Palimino, George Pimental and the Olympic coach, Sarge Johnson.  Members of the team who were also not aboard included  Bobby Czyz, Akex Ramos and James Shuler.

Bumphus earned his place on the team with a win over Ronnie Shields. Bumphus did not compete in the Olympics, due to the  1980 Summer Olympic boycott. In 2007, he received one of 461 Congressional Gold Medals created especially for the spurned athletes.



Attachment: 111FCC67-880A-436F-AA97-339F4F22F5D2.jpeg (Downloaded 37 times)

Last edited on Tue Feb 19th, 2019 08:06 am by Papa Voo

khawk
Hall Of Famer


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Canada
Posts: 15423
Status: 
Offline
I remember Bumphus being featured on TV Boxing prominently back then. "Bump City" was a kick ass nickname for any era.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Leonard vs. Duran (Part 1)


On June 20, 1980, Roberto Duran won the WBC welterweight title by defeating Sugar Ray Leonard by unanimous decision in 15 hard-fought rounds. The fight took place at the Olympic Stadium in Montreal. 1. Duran entered the bout 71-1 after a long career at the lightweight division.

Known as “The Brawl in Montreal,” the fight garnered much hype. This was Leonard’s first fight back in Montreal since he won his Olympic gold medal in 1976. His flashy personality and marketability had already made him a household name. Leonard won his WBC title belt after knocking Wilfred Benitez out in November 1979, and he defended it against Dave Green with a fourth-round KO in March 1980.


Duran, nicknamed “Hands of Stone,” developed a reputation as a dynamic, knockout puncher at the lightweight division. He unified the WBA and WBC titles at the lightweight in 1978 after knocking out WBC champ Esteban De Jesús. Duran vacated the titles the next year to move up to welterweight.


During the pre-fight press conference, Duran repeatedly insulted Leonard to get under his skin. This prompted Leonard to tell the media he would “kill” Duran during their fight.

The fight

Angelo Dundee, Leonard’s trainer, advised his fighter to box smart against Duran. Leonard, known for his quick movements and boxing prowess, elected to fight toe-to-toe with Duran, but that favored the Panamanian bruiser. In the early rounds of the fight, Duran repeatedly cornered Leonard and forced him into the ropes. Duran punished Leonard with body shots and appeared to be in control through the first half of the bout.
The tide slowly turned for Leonard around the 10th round, as he began to fight closer to his natural style and fatigue set in for Duran. The next round, however, Leonard again retreated to the corners and spent more than half the round on the ropes. The last three rounds were a slugfest in which both fighters landed hard shots, but neither fighter gave in. The post-fight decision left confusion because of a judge’s scoring error, but Duran won by unanimous decision 145-144, 148-147, 146-144.

The numbers
Duran was the aggressor early and often during the fight. He consistently cornered Leonard and kept him on the ropes, landing power shots while his opponent was stagnant. Leonard averaged five fewer jabs (three) per round in this fight than in his 16 other fights tracked by CompuBox.

Leonard made adjustments later in the fight, but Duran had built a large lead early. At one point in the third round, Leonard was on the ropes for 30 seconds and took 17 punches.

The aftermath


The loss was the first of Leonard’s career and a defining moment. Leonard gained some respect for his will to fight in Duran’s style, but he also lost because he fought to the strength of his opponent. On the flip side, it was arguably the biggest win of Duran’s storied career. The fight was one of the many battles between the top fighters of the era (Duran, Leonard, Hearns, Hagler). Duran and Leonard would go on to fight two more times, once in November 1980 and again in December 1989.


Attachment: 44A92D25-7F59-4BED-B298-7561854AC4AC.jpeg (Downloaded 34 times)

Last edited on Tue Feb 19th, 2019 05:37 pm by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Leonard vs. Duran (Part 2) 


Sugar Ray Leonard vs Roberto Duran II, also known as the No Más Fight, is one of the most famous fights in boxing history. It took place on November 25, 1980 at the Louisiana Super Dome in New Orleans, United States and was the second of three bouts between the pair. It gained its famous name from the moment at the end of the eighth round when Durán turned away from Leonard towards the referee and quit by apparently saying, "No más" (Spanish for "No more").

Their first fight took place on June 20, 1980 in Montreal. Leonard was defending the wBC Welterweight Championship for the second time. Durán was the WBC #1 welterweight contender.

Leonard abandoned his usual slick boxing style and stood flat-footed with Durán. Leonard, angry with Durán over his numerous insults, wanted to beat Durán at his own game. The tactic resulted in a great fight but a losing effort for Leonard. Durán won by unanimous decision. The scores were 148–147, 145–144, and 146–144.


The rematch took place November 25, 1980 at the Superdome in New Orleans. Leonard used his superior speed and movement to outbox and befuddle Durán. "The whole fight, I was moving, I was moving," Leonard said. "And Voom! I snapped his head back with a jab. Voom! I snapped it back again. He tried to get me against the ropes, I'd pivot, spin off and Pow! Come under with a punch."

In Round 7, Leonard started to taunt Durán. Leonard's most memorable punch came late in the round. Winding up his right hand, as if to throw a bolo punch, Leonard snapped out a left jab and caught Durán flush in the face.

In the closing seconds of the eighth round, Durán turned his back to Leonard and quit, waving his glove and apparently saying to referee Octavio Meyran, "No más" ("No more" in Spanish). Leonard was the winner by a technical knockout at 2:44 of Round 8, regaining the WBC Welterweight Championship. Leonard led by a small margin of 68–66, 68–66, and 67–66 on the judges scorecards at the time of the TKO.

Attachment: C191707C-20E4-4FDD-832B-1B1359DE010D.jpeg (Downloaded 33 times)

Last edited on Tue Feb 19th, 2019 05:54 pm by Papa Voo

Ultimark



Joined: Sun Oct 28th, 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 6798
Status: 
Offline
Papa Voo wrote: LOL

I also was not a Ray Leonard fan. I was rooting for Benitez in their bout.

Leonard’s comeback was disgusting. There was almost nothing that could stop them from creating their “boxing marketing” champion.
I wasn't either.  I can remember desperately rooting for Tommy Hearns and Duran.  
The 80's was definitely the last great decade for boxing imo. I don't even know who the heavyweight champ(s) is anymore.  I also don't care.  In the 80's there were numerous notable fighters at almost every weight class.  I boxed in the Army so I would watch them all with interest, especially the Welterweights.  

Big Garea Fan

 

Joined: Wed Mar 4th, 2009
Location:  
Posts: 2546
Status: 
Offline
Boxing in the 80s was all about the middleweights/welterweights with all of the fighters already mentioned (Sugar Ray Leonard, Thomas "Hitman" Hearns, Roberto Duran, "Marvelous" Marvin Hagler, etc). Here in Maryland, Sugar Ray Leonard (from Palmer Park, MD) fights were all over the news stations.
In the 90s, I think the focus shifted to the heavyweights as Mike Tyson, Evander Holyfield, George Foreman, Lennox Lewis, Riddick Bowe, and other fighters main evented PPVs. These fighters all seemed to have controversial fights / close decisions which resulted in multiple rematches and led me to believe that boxing was rigged. My faith in boxing being a fair sport has never been restored - especially after the Mayweather vs. McGregor spectacle.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Featherweight Champion Salvador Sanchez 

Salvador Sanchez began boxing at age 16. 

Sanchez’s only defeat came at a young age to seasoned veteran Antonio Becerra who was Mexican bantamweight champion at the time. Sanchez kept fighting and moved up to the featherweight division and beat the likes of Felix Trinidad Sr.  Sanchez wirked his way to a title shot against featherweight workd champion Danny “Little Red” Lopez.  The 21-year old Sanchez took on the tough champion and knocked out Lopez in 13 rounds on February 2, 1980. 



February 2, 1980. Sánchez defended his title for the first time with a 15-round unanimous decision against Ruben Castillo (47–1). Thinking it was just a case of 'beginner’s luck' (as it was Sánchez's first world title fight ever), Lopez looked for a rematch and this he got, in Las Vegas. This time Sánchez defeated Lopez by 14th-round TKO. In his next fight, he defeated Patrick Ford (15–0).


On December 13, 1980, Sánchez defeated future champion Juan LaPorte by unanimous decision. Sánchez then defended his title against Roberto Castanon (43–1–0) and scored a win over Nicky Perez (50–3–0). Then undefeated World Jr Featherweight champion Wilfred Gomez (32–0–1) went up in weight and challenged Sánchez. Sánchez retained the crown by a knockout in round eight on August 21, 1981, in Las Vegas, and Gómez had to return to the Jr. Featherweight division.

With that victory, Salvador was an unknown to the casual boxing fan no more. He became a household name all over the United States that night.

In his next fight, he defeated Olympic medalist Pat Cowdellby split decision. His defense vs unheralded Jorge "Rocky" Garcia was the first fight featuring two featherweights ever to be televised by HBO. He beat Garcia punch after punch, but the challenger gave honor to his nickname, an unknown fighter who lasts the distance with the world champion.
On July 21, 1982, Sánchez faced future champion Azumah Nelson at Madison Square Garden. Nelson, a late substitute for mandatory challenger Mario Miranda, was unknown at the time however, and was expected to only go a few rounds with the champ. It was an intense battle, with Sánchez managing to drop his young charge in the 7th round. After that they engaged in violent exchange after violent exchange. In the 15th, Sánchez broke out finally, connecting with a serious combination that dropped the challenger almost outside the ring. Referee Tony Perez had to stop the fight seconds later. Azumah Nelson went on to have a glittering career and was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 2004.

Sánchez's dominance as featherweight champion was such that he held title defense victories over the next three fighters (LaPorte, Gomez, and Nelson) who won the WBC title after his death. He went 4-0, all by knockout, against fellow members of the International Boxing Hall of Fame (Danny Lopez twice-KO 13, KO 14-Wilfredo Gomez-KO 8-and Azumah Nelson-KO 15)

Death

As he was training for a rematch with Laporte set for September, he crashed on the early morning of August 12, 1982, while driving his Porsche 928 sports car along the federal highway from Santiago de Queretaro to San Luis Potosi, dying instantly.   At the time of his death, there were talks about a bout with Miranda, a rematch with Gómez or a challenge of world lightweight champion Alexis Arguello.  The latter was already off the table. There had been negotiations between the Sánchez and Argüello camps but they broke off when Argüello chose to campaign as a junior welterweight. Salvador Sánchez finished his career 44-1-1. Sánchez was posthumously inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1991.


***I enjoy going back and watching some of Sanchez’s matches on youtube.  Fast with power. 

Attachment: E6B648B7-C18F-4CF5-8FCD-CE82D2D3AAEE.jpeg (Downloaded 27 times)

Last edited on Tue Feb 19th, 2019 10:43 pm by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline

Muhammad Ali vs Larry Holmes (WBC champion) 


October 2, 1980

On July 17, 1980, Ali and Holmes signed to fight on October 2 at Caesers Palace in Las Vegas. Promoter Don King said Ali would be paid $8 million and Holmes $6 million. Caesars Palace constructed a temporary 24,790-seat outdoor arena for the fight. The live gate was $6 million, a record for that time.


Due to concerns for Ali's health, the Nevada State Athletic Commission had the former champion examined at Minnesota's Mayo Clinic as a prerequisite to being granted a boxing license. Ali checked into the clinic on July 23, 1980. His neurological exam was conducted by Dr. Frank Howard, whose report contained the following information: Ali showed a slight degree of missing when he tried to touch his finger to his nose, he had difficulty in coordinating the muscles used in speaking, and he did not hop on one foot with expected agility. However, Dr. Howard determined that there were no specific findings to prohibit Ali from fighting. The Mayo Clinic report was forwarded to the Nevada State Athletic Committee, but it was not made public at that time. Based on the report, Ali was granted a boxing license in Nevada.


Ali weighed in at 217½ pounds, his lightest weight since he defeated George Foreman on October 30, 1974.

There were no knockdowns, but Holmes dominated the fight and was given every round by all three judges. Holmes won through a technical knockout after Ali's trainer Angelo Dundee stopped the fight after the tenth round. 

According to Ferdie Pacheco, Ali's former ring doctor, "All the people involved in this fight should've been arrested. This fight was an abomination, a crime."  Pacheco had earlier quit Ali's camp, in 1977, after Ali's fight with Earnie Shavers. Pacheco claims he had sent Ali's medical results to Angelo Dundee, Jabir Herbert Muhammad, Ali, and Veronica Porche Ali noting that "This is what's happening to you. If you want to continue, you have no shot at a normal life." Pacheco says he never received any response to his warning.  In 2012, Ali met Pacheco for the last time and told him "you was right", something he had said to Pacheco several times before. According to Pacheco after Ali's death in 2016:

The unnecessary punches he took wouldn't have stopped the Parkinson's. But I think it would not have compounded it as it has. Who knows, Ali may not have passed away now if he'd stopped when I asked. He may not have been trapped in a shell like he was for so many years.

Attachment: 4220A4C1-8E43-4621-AB9B-719F85A4107B.jpeg (Downloaded 27 times)

Last edited on Tue Feb 19th, 2019 11:18 pm by Papa Voo

WongLee
Hall Of Famer


Joined: Fri Oct 19th, 2007
Location: Bay Shore, New York
Posts: 6824
Status: 
Offline
Out of all my MSG memories, one of the biggest ones was having good seats to the Hagler vs. Hamsho title defense. Undisputed champion Hagler was at his peak. Hamsho was a legit top ten contender. The fight itself wasn't too competitive as Hagler stopped Mustafa in the 5th of 6th round.There really was something uniquely exciting in the air with fight night at the Garden.

John "The Beast" Mugabi was an incredibly exciting fighter and one of my favorites. He fought a very game fight against Hagler even though he was stopped.

Two Bronx boys were also at the top of my list for favorite fighters in Iran Barkley and Davey Moore. Unfortunately for Barkley he hung around WAY too long. I was almost in tears when Duran thumbed Davey in the eye at their MSG bout and took a lopsided victory against the Bronx kid. Davey was fighting in his own backyard but the Garden crowd was completely behind Duran. Davey was killed way too young in an automobile accident near his home.

A great heavyweight of the time was Michael Dokes. Built like a tank and seemed unbeatable with insane knockout power. Cocaine did him in professionaly.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
The Beast was probably my favorite boxer of the 1980’s.  

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline

John “The Beast” Mugabi 



Representing Uganda, Mugabi was the Silver medalist at the 1980 Olympic Games in Moscow, boxing in the Welterweight class. Mugabi lost to Andres Aldama of Cuba in the final.

John Mugabi started as a professional on December 5, 1980, by knocking out Oemer Karadenis in round one in Cologne. Soon after that win, Mugabi moved to London where he became acquainted with boxing promoter Mickey Duff, an expert in boxer marketing who landed Mugabi various fights in England and built his reputation there. Mugabi won eight fights in Europe. Searching for more formidable foes, John moved to Florida where he became a favourite of American TV networks with his sensational knockouts of contenders such as Curtis Ramsey, Gary Guiden, former world champion Eddue Gazo, Curtis Parker, Frank The Animal Fletcher, Nino Gonzalez and Earl Hargrove through a display of tenacity and ferociousness.'The Beast’ as he would become known (for his ferocious attacks and untamable style—bashing his prey with overhand rights and wild left hooks) was able to fluctuate his weight between middleweight and junior middleweight. Some people lose effectiveness by changing weight classes, but not Mugabi. He was able to knock out every opponent he faced to that point of his career.

Mugabi’s first victory of note came on May 2, 1982, when he took on veteran Curtis Ramsey. It was Mugabi’s 11th bout and he took care of the American in two rounds in Atlantic City, New Jersey. 1983 was a busy calendar year for the Beast. In that year he took on Gary Guiden, who had just come off of a Championship fight against Davey Moore; Mugabi stopped him in three. Many started speculating about Mugabi’s role in the future of the Junior Middleweight and Middleweight divisions. The fact Mugabi easily made the weight at both divisions made him more intriguing than most prospects. Nicaraguan, Eddie Gazo, a former WBA Junior Middleweight Champion provided Mugabi with his first real test. Gazo went rounds with Mugabi, but ‘The Beast’ ended things the way he always did. Mugabi was simply stronger and faster tactically overwhelming the busier Gazo. In the same year, Mugabi took on Curtis Parker a former Pennsylvania Golden Gloves amateur champion )The ‘meeting’ with Curtis Parker was on national television. Parker was an established fighter, but Mugabi’s destruction of Parker was savage. It was the first time that Parker had lost a bout by knockout.


In February 1984 Mugabi’s ability to take adversity was tested by James ‘Hard Rock’ Green. Mugabi slowly took control of the fight until it was stopped in the 10th round, with Mugabi declared the winner by technical knockout. The bout between ‘The Beast’ and Frank ‘The Animal’ Fletcher marked a quiet maturity that marked Mugabi’s transformation from being what had been dubbed a ‘banger’ with raw power to a refined tactical boxer. The Beast hurt his prey, gently testing with his jabs and then in the 4th round a couple of roundhouse punches and a haymaker travelling all the way from his waist caught Fletcher asleep—the fight ended with Fletcher’s body between the ropes.


On his way to becoming the number one contender for the middleweight title of each of the three major sanctioning bodies (WBA, WBC, and IBF),   Mugabi ran roughshod over the division and finished each of his opponents inside the distance. Mugabi's ferocity was captured by Phil Berger. Writing in the New York Times in 1986, Berger, commenting on Mugabi’s preparation for the Hagler fight noted the intensity of preparation that left his sparring partners in a 'woebegone condition' and further that some did not last long enough to draw their second paycheck and left Mugabi’s training camp ‘looking like extras from 'Night of the Living Dead'.


Because of his ability to fight both at junior middleweight and middleweight, fans began to talk about the possibility of him challenging either world light middleweight champion Hearns or world middleweight champion Hagler. Despite Mugabi being a mandatory contender for some time, a Hearns - Mugabi title match never materialised, as Hearns elected to move to Middleweight to challenge Marvelous Marvin Hagler. Considering his streak and Hagler's tough battle with Hearns on April 15, 1985, some felt Mugabi had a shot at doing what eleven men before him could not: wresting Hagler's undisputed world middleweight title from him. On March 10, 1986, Marvin ‘Marvelous’ Hagler rose to a very stiff challenge. A young, undefeated powerhouse was destroying every opponent in his path. John ‘The Beast’ Mugabi had won all of his contests by knockout—many spectacular; many in the first few rounds of the fight. He possessed incredible knockout power and provided the boxing world with an epic encounter.


The fight was the first televised by Showtime. Mugabi landed his share of blows to Hagler's head during the early rounds. The turning point came in the sixth round when Hagler landed many heavy blows and staggered Mugabi. Mugabi fought back gamely but his early knockout wins left him ill-prepared for a long, tough fight. In the end, it was Hagler who came out the victor, with a knockout in the eleventh round. Many boxing fans consider this to have been the toughest contest of Hagler's career.  Sugar Ray Leonard’s decision to come out of retirement and challenge Hagler for the Middleweight Championship was heavily influenced by Hagler's performance in the Mugabi fight.


After his first loss, Mugabi retired to Uganda and ballooned in weight to 190  lbs. In September 1986 he contacted Mickey Duff, stating that he was ready to fight again. Mugabi went down in weight and was given an opportunity by the WBC to win their world light middleweight title, vacated by Hearns. Once again many fans favoured him, this time against Duane Thomas, on December 5 of '86. However, Mugabi suffered a broken eye socket, the consequence of a punch in round three and the fight had to be stopped. Mugabi underwent optical surgery the next day to repair his injury.


Discouraged by two consecutive losses, Mugabi gained weight and did not fight for nearly fourteen months. In January 1988, he came back to fight Bryan Grant on the undercard of Mike Tyson's title defence against Larry Holmes. Mugabi won by quick knockout and set off on another knockout winning streak. He became number one contender for the WBC 154  lb title in August 1988 but could not land a fight with then-champion Donald Curry. After Curry lost his title in an upset in early 1989, Mugabi was given another opportunity to become world champion by the WBC. On July 8 of that year, Mugabi finally made his dream come true, knocking out Curry's successor Rene Jacquot in round one in Grenoble to become the WBC light middleweight champion.After two first-round knockout wins against Ricky Stackhouse and Carlos Antunes, Mugabi, who by this time was having difficulty making the weight limit of 154  lbs, put his title on the line against Terry Norris. When Norris downed the champion for the count with a right to the jaw, Mugabi received the dubious distinction as the second fighter, after Al Singer, to both win and lose a world title by the first-round knockout when he was defeated by Norris.Showing resilience, Mugabi resurfaced with two more wins and once again found himself fighting for a world title, facing Gerald McCellan on November 20, 1991, in London for the vacant WBO middleweight championship. Mugabi looked a shadow of his former self by this time, and once again came out on the losing end, again by a first-round knockout.

Mugabi took a five-year layoff in which he moved to Australia.In 1996, he came back for the first of an eight-fight comeback. He went on to claim the Australian middleweight championship by way of a 12th-round decision over Jamie Wallace. It only took John two fights before he was in line for a world title again. In his third fight back from the loss to Norris, Mugabi would challenge Glen Kelly. That November night in 1999, marked the decline of Mugabi’s illustrious boxing career as he was again knocked out in the eighth round. 
Mugabi resides in Australia where among other functions he trains fighters.

When Mugabi finally retired, he had a record of 42 wins, 7 losses and 1 draw, 39 wins by knockout.His 26 fight knockout win streak stands as one of the longest knockout streaks ever in boxing.


Attachment: 083368E6-00FE-4339-9C08-96772BD35123.jpeg (Downloaded 27 times)

Last edited on Wed Feb 20th, 2019 12:42 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Hagler Tames The Beast

March 10, 1986


Hagler KO’s Mugabi in Round 11


    Mugabi had won all 26 of his professional fights by knockout.
    Hagler had made eleven successful title defenses, winning ten by knockout.
    The fight was originally scheduled for November 14, 1985, but it was postponed after Hagler suffered a back injury and a broken nose. His nose was broken by a headbutt while sparring with Zack Hewitt.
    Hagler made $2.5 million, plus a percentage of the revenue. Mugabi got $750,000.
    The fight was shown at 500 closed-circuit locations in the U.S. and Canada and was available to 3½ million homes on pay-per-view. 
    Showtime had delayed rights. It was the first boxing card aired on Showtime. 
    Hagler was a 3 to 1 favorite.
    Mugabi gave Hagler a tough fight and almost closed his right eye.
    Hagler hurt Mugabi in the sixth round and came close to finishing the challenger.
    Hagler put Mugabi down for the count in the eleventh round.
    After the fight, both fighters were urinating blood and were hospitalized.
    This was Hagler’s last victory.

Attachment: 46E7C74A-4F25-4D51-BDAC-55DEF06F1801.jpeg (Downloaded 27 times)

Last edited on Tue Feb 19th, 2019 11:53 pm by Papa Voo

khawk
Hall Of Famer


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Canada
Posts: 15423
Status: 
Offline
I distinctly remember the hype on TV for The Beast vs. Frank "The Animal" Fletcher. Huge Hype. I liked Mugabi a lot too.

Ultimark



Joined: Sun Oct 28th, 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 6798
Status: 
Offline
Hagler won but that Mugabi fight took it all out of him.  

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline

Frank “The Animal” Fletcher

Like a meteor nearing the end of its violent life, Philadelphia middleweight contender Frank “The Animal” Fletcher scorched across the fistic firmament in just nine years and 25 professional fights, quite possibly in the knowledge that he had to get it all done before his demons swallowed him for good. “I’ve had so many problems in my life,” Fletcher once said, “that I’ve often thought the only place you can get peace of mind is in a graveyard somewhere.”

Thankfully, the graveyard has yet to consume Frank, but how he diced with death throughout his wildly exciting career in the eighties. A “kill me if you can” slugger from the primitive days of yore, the teak-tough Fletcher became the thrilling darling of NBC-TV as he steadily ripped and slashed his way to the number one contender’s position and a likely title tilt at world champion Marvin Hagler. 

Cheered on by his vociferous, flag-waving mom Lucille, Frank produced one thunderous performance after another as he battered and broke the will of his opponents in a series of brutal, cliff-hanging battles. Fletcher was a true-blue member of the modern-day Philadelphia school of heart-arresting excitement.

Then the punishment caught up with Frank and he began to fall apart. All fighters do when they tempt fate once too often. Even the great Matthew Saad Muhammad, whose durability was astonishing, finally crumbled.

One could argue that Fletcher’s sudden demise was due solely to the punches he took, but that explanation is a little too simplistic in his case. Frank’s turbulent life was constantly one of turmoil and confrontation.

Reflected

In 1983, when he was still Hagler’s leading contender, Fletcher reflected on his life: “For 15 to 20 years, I was in and out of jail. Jail was my second home. There was nothing to do. I didn’t like working for nobody. I didn’t want to get a job. I was stealing, taking things, but there was no guns or nothing. At the time, I thought that was the happening, you know? Why do most people stay in trouble? Because they like it.”

At the age of 12, Fletcher was a court-mandated ward of the Youth Development Center North at 2nd and Luzerne streets.

“I started getting into trouble when I was about nine,” Fletcher said. “I think I broke into a car or something like that. I was always breaking into something or getting into fights when I was a kid.

“I don’t know why I was doing it. But my mother was always coming to get me out of the police station up at 65th and Woodland or 55th and Pine. After a while, I guess she just got tired of coming to get me.”

By early 1985, after three punishing losses in the last five fights of his career, Frank’s boxing days were over, but his prison career would continue to flourish. By 1987, he was talking to Daily Newssports writer Elmer Smith from behind bars at the Graterford State Correctional Institute. Frank was one of 2,600 prisoners and had recently been stabbed in the chest by a fellow inmate. But Fletcher wasn’t complaining or making any kind of noise about the incident. “That’s the way they roll around here,” he explained. “A guy gets whacked and nobody sees anything.”

Frank was back inside for aggravated assault, something he did very well in the ring. How he soared through the ranks! It was all crash-bang-wallop, blood and guts, thrills and spills. Nineteen fights, only a couple of defeats, and there he was at number one, knocking at the great Hagler’s door.

The big break for Fletcher came in 1980 when he became the first 160-pound winner of the ESPN tournament. It was so gloriously typical of Frank that he did it the hard way. You got the impression that he could have made fence painting or lawn mowing a similarly thrilling experience. Barnstorming his way to the ESPN crown, Fletcher began with a points victory over tough Ben Serrano before going on to knock out Jerome (Silky) Jackson, William (Caveman) Lee and Randy O’Grady.

Nigel Collins, editor of The Ring at that time, wrote of Fletcher: “The savage knockout of Jackson also brought Fletcher more — it earned him the Animal nickname. The favored Silky took 10 stitches in his lower lip and spent the night in the hospital for observation after Fletcher chewed him up and spat out the pieces. Frank’s uncompromising, let-it-all-hang-out style had emerged and there was no turning back. From there on it was kill or be killed. He seemed to have caught the Saad Muhammad Syndrome and fans and matchmakers alike ate it up.”

Torrid

Fletcher continued to set a torrid pace for his opponents as he moved up the world rankings. He was NBC-TV’s golden boy and attracted huge afternoon TV audiences with a series of pulsating wins at the Sands Casino Hotel in Atlantic City. Frank won the vacant USBA middleweight title when he outscored Norberto Sabater in a barnburner that is still discussed by those who saw it. It was a title that Fletcher would retain four times in bloody and brutal encounters.

It seemed that Frank captivated his opponents in the same way he wooed the crowds. His challengers didn’t just want to fight him, they wanted to fight him the Fletcher way. They wanted to step into Frank’s inferno and outgame him in the old-fashioned, do-or-die manner. It wasn’t a good game plan. Ernie Singletary went out in eight rounds, Tony Braxton and Clint Jackson had to endure all 12 rounds of Fletcher’s mayhem, while James (Hard Rock) Green was bombed out in six.

Then came the sudden slide, which didn’t seem too dramatic at first. Frank lost his USBA title in 1983 on a unanimous decision to Wilford Scypion, but it wasn’t a defeat that rang too many alarm bells. But perhaps it was just as well that Scypion got the title shot at Marvin Hagler instead of Fletcher. Marvelous Marvin dispatched Scypion in four rounds and most probably would have made a chopping block out of Frank the Animal.

Fletcher came back from the Scypion loss five months later to stop Curtis Ramsey in eight rounds at the Sands, but four months later Frank was bludgeoned to a sixth round knockout defeat by the powerful Juan Domingo Roldan at Caesars Palace. A classic product of Argentina, the bull-like Roldan was a very strong and dangerous fighter who, like his predecessor Eduardo Lausse, always looked like a man who could go all the way. While he didn’t make it to the very top level, the unpredictable Roldan gave Hagler and Thomas Hearns some very uncomfortable moments in two title challenges.

Vulnerable

I recall how dreadfully vulnerable Frank Fletcher suddenly looked after Roldan banged him out in brutal fashion. Suddenly, it seemed, there was nothing left. Frank’s famous resistance had been smashed out of him. Gamely, he rallied back in 1984 with a points win over Jimmy Sykes, but then two crushing defeats to John Mugabi and Curtis Parker confirmed that Frank the Animal was a fatally wounded beast. And that was it. Career over.

Marty Feldman, Fletcher’s trainer and co-manager, reckoned that Frank must have pocketed half a million dollars in ring earnings after deductions. But Frank spent it as soon as he got it and, according to Feldman, had lost his fighting edge after the thrilling victory over James (Hard Rock) Green. On the surface, Fletcher was still doing all the right things, but he also started going out at night as his self-discipline slipped. He had lost his edge and was no longer serious about training. After the final loss against Curtis Parker, Feldman urged Frank to retire.

It was a sound decision for the sake of Fletcher’s health, but it also made him a lost soul. He couldn’t knuckle down and do anything else. He opened a sandwich shop but took no interest in it. On Feldman’s advice, Frank also opened a retirement account, which he quickly plundered.

Finally, the old life pulled him back and he became another statistic at the Graterford Correctional Institute, where any number of unpleasant things can happen to a man. As Mike Tyson discovered, being a formidable fighter doesn’t make you untouchable in that gray and claustrophobic world.

“This place is not like jail,” Fletcher told reporter Elmer Smith in 1987. “It’s like one of those places in one of those horror movies where you’re just walking around in the fog. All of a sudden you come out of the fog and this big, scary building is right in front of you.”
Alas, no happy ending. Frank the Animal is still walking around in the fog and remains caged.


Attachment: F12B8C17-1E8C-4641-BDB5-9B8AD37A61A7.jpeg (Downloaded 21 times)

Last edited on Wed Feb 20th, 2019 11:48 pm by Papa Voo

beejmi
The Big Kahuna


Joined: Sat Oct 13th, 2007
Location: Philly
Posts: 40828
Status: 
Offline
I always felt that boxing did itself in by becoming a PPV sport



When 'we all' were growing up, on Wide World Of Sports, there was 'free boxing' every weekend. Not big fights but you got to see the names and personalities like Ken Norton, Ernie Shavers and Joe Frazier and you grew to like them and their 'styles'.


I couldn't name 3 heavyweight boxers right now if I tried.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline


beejmi wrote: I always felt that boxing did itself in by becoming a PPV sport



When 'we all' were growing up, on Wide World Of Sports, there was 'free boxing' every weekend. Not big fights but you got to see the names and personalities like Ken Norton, Ernie Shavers and Joe Frazier and you grew to like them and their 'styles'.


I couldn't name 3 heavyweight boxers right now if I tried.


I remember one of the first PPVs that I remember was Larry Holmes vs. Gerry Cooney. 

You are also right about the personalities.  It was like wrestling to an extent.  Earnie Shavers had no chance of winning a technical match; he could only win by putting somebody in La-La Land.  

Another thing that has been lost from our younger years. 

Last edited on Wed Feb 20th, 2019 11:53 pm by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline


John “The Beast” Mugabi TKOs Frank “The Animal” Fletcher in the 4th Round on Augsut 5, 1984.

Attachment: F3F2AF74-0284-47FC-A25B-6F66040B930E.jpeg (Downloaded 18 times)

Last edited on Wed Feb 20th, 2019 11:58 pm by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline

We cannot forget......
Thomas “The Hitman” Hearns 

Thomas Hearns out of the KRONK Gym in Detroit.
 
I liked and respected Hearns, because he did not duck anybody.  He also had the nice mix of being a technical boxer, heavy hitter, brawler or whatever role he had to be to measure up to his opponent. 

Attachment: CAF8DC30-A167-4E1A-9F86-3421205F3FE5.jpeg (Downloaded 18 times)

Last edited on Thu Feb 21st, 2019 12:06 pm by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline

The Hitman 

Attachment: 5AACAEA1-C682-4012-81BB-0A5776C95D14.jpeg (Downloaded 18 times)

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline

Another big PPV event.  It was the talk of all my friends in school.

September 16, 1981

Sugar Ray Leonard won the WBC welterweight title with a fifteenth-round knockout of Wilfred Benitez in1979. He lost it to Roberto Duran by a close decision in June 1980 and regained it five months later in the infamous No Mas Fight, in which Duran quit in the eighth round. In June 1981, Leonard moved up to the light-middleweight division for one fight, knocking out Ayub Kalule in nine rounds to win the WBA light-middleweight title.

Hearns won the WBA welterweight title in 1980, scoring a second-round knockout of Jose “Pipino” Cuevas in Detroit, Michigan. He made three successful title defenses, stopping Luis Primera, Randy Shields, and Pablo Baez.

Promoted as "The Showdown in Motown" Leonard (30-1 with 21 KO) fought Hearns (32-0 with 30 KO) on September 16, 1981 at Joe Louis Arena in Detroit, Michigan to unify the world welterweight championship in a scheduled fifteen-rounder. They fought before a live crowd of 23,618 and a worldwide TV audience of some 300 million.

The fight began as expected, Leonard boxing from a distance and Hearns stalking. Leonard had difficulty with Hearns' long reach and sharp jab. By the end of round five, Leonard had a growing swelling under his left eye, and Hearns had built a considerable lead on the scorecards. Leonard, becoming more aggressive, hurt Hearns in the sixth with a left hook to the chin. Leonard battered Hearns in rounds six and seven, but Hearns miraculously regrouped. Hearns started to stick and move, and he started to pile up points again. The roles reversed: Leonard became the stalker and Hearns became the boxer.

Hearns won rounds nine through twelve on all three scorecards. Between rounds twelve and thirteen, Leonard's trainer, the legendary Angelo Dundee, said the now legendary words "You're blowing it now, son! You're blowing it!"

Leonard, with a badly swollen left eye, came out roaring for the thirteenth round. After hurting Hearns with a right, Leonard exploded with a combination of punches and sent Hearns through the ropes. Hearns managed to rise, but was dropped again near the end of the round.

In round fourteen, after staggering Hearns with an overhand right, Leonard pinned Hearns against the ropes, where he unleashed another furious combination, prompting referee Davey Pearl to stop the contest and award Sugar Ray Leonard the unified world welterweight championship. Hearns was leading by scores of 124-122, 125-122, and 125-121.

After the fight, there was controversy due to the scoring of rounds six and seven. Even though Leonard dominated, hurting Hearns and battering him, all three judges gave both rounds to Leonard by a 10-9 margin. Many felt that the ten-point must scoring system was not properly used and those rounds should have been scored 10-8.


Attachment: 4E6E28CA-4C6A-4407-8E7E-8E7D31E6EA9C.jpeg (Downloaded 18 times)

Last edited on Thu Feb 21st, 2019 12:14 pm by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline

My favorite boxing match of all time. Very short, but it was all out war! 
Hagler vs. Hearns

Attachment: D2F65529-7BB4-4229-9FE2-7081E26CB9C4.jpeg (Downloaded 16 times)

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline


April 15, 1984


There are action-packed fights, and then there is this: The unforgettable spectacle waged by Marvin Hagler and Thomas Hearns, who slugged it out with such mind-blowing reckless abandon that it came to be revered as the quintessential action fight, the one that all others are measured against.

The fight didn't last long -- less than three full rounds (8 minutes, 1 second, to be exact) -- but it was perhaps the most electrifying three rounds in boxing history. It was three rounds of pure violence on boxing's grandest stage between two of the best in the business who, along with Sugar Ray Leonard and Roberto Duran, defined the sport in the 1980s.

Hagler and Hearns both would have preferred a fight with Leonard. Hagler was hungry for the spotlight and the enormous purse it would bring, and Hearns wanted revenge for his only loss, a 14th-round knockout to Leonard in their legendary 1981 undisputed welterweight championship fight. But with Leonard in one of his retirements and out of the picture, Hagler and Hearns turned to each other.

The 30-year-old Hagler, 60-2-2 with 50 knockouts (and having avenged both losses), was the undisputed middleweight champion. The 26-year-old Hearns, who was 40-1 with 34 KOs, had put the loss to Leonard behind him and won the junior middleweight title, but he was moving up in weight to challenge for Hagler's 160-pound crown.

Many forget that Hagler and Hearns had originally been scheduled to fight in May 1982, but Hearns suffered a right hand injury, forcing it to be postponed and later canceled, angering Hagler.

They both continued fighting other opponents, but when the time was right, Hagler-Hearns was eventually made again, this time for April 15, 1985, at the outdoor arena at famed Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. A massive promotion ensued, including a nearly two-week media tour to more than 20 cities across the country.

Day after day, Hagler and Hearns went face-to-face, insulted each other and answered the same questions over and over. They quickly grew tired of each other and got so deeply under each other's skin that they nearly came to blows during the media tour. More than once.

By the time they got to the ring, they seemed to want to kill each other.

When the bell rang after a huge buildup, there was no feeling-out period to speak of. They stormed at each other, and it was on. Punch after punch, neither man let up in an incredible first round hailed by many as the greatest in boxing history.

It was absolutely wild.

Hagler hurt Hearns right off the bat with a right hand, and they spent the rest of the round engaged in a series of fierce toe-to-toe exchanges.

Hearns busted open a cut on Hagler's forehead and, as we would later learn, also broke his right hand -- the power weapon that had disposed of so many previous opponents.

"That was an entire fight accomplished in three minutes," broadcaster Al Michaels exclaimed when the round ended.


The pace did slow in the second round, but it's all relative. There was no way that it could equal the blistering pace the fighters had set in the first three minutes. Still, it was action-packed despite Hearns being a bit rubber-legged.


They spent the final half-minute of the second round in an extended exchange as blood poured from the cut on Hagler's forehead. His corner did an admirable job closing it up between rounds, but it opened again in the third. With Hagler's face covered in blood, referee Richard Steele called timeout to have it examined by the ringside doctor.

Obviously concerned that the fight might be stopped because of the cut, Hagler went after the knockout, pushing even harder than he had in the first two rounds. He cracked Hearns with a right hand that rocked him and kept the pressure on, eventually landing another clean right to the side of Hearns' head to sent him staggering sideways. Hagler followed up with two more right hands that left Hearns limp and falling to the mat like a discarded towel. Somehow, a semi-conscious Hearns got to his feet by the count of nine, but he was gone. Steele wrapped an arm around Hearns and waved the other high overhead, ending one of the most incredible fights in boxing history.

Hagler, his face a bloody mask, celebrated while Hearns was carried back to his corner by one of his handlers. They had fought three rounds that will live forever.

If you want to watch this classic:

https://youtu.be/rOZZoaUWf34








Attachment: EE2837CB-6D53-4A6D-BD51-A3106FB0AADD.jpeg (Downloaded 16 times)

Last edited on Fri Feb 22nd, 2019 10:58 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Hagler vs Hearns

Attachment: 0B87D00C-CCA2-4574-BBBC-10F0B563EADD.jpeg (Downloaded 16 times)

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Hagler vs Hearns

Attachment: 9D5912BE-A7D5-427E-AA41-E6A5A29DCF48.jpeg (Downloaded 16 times)

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline


Hagler getting ready to put Hearns on Queer Steet.

Attachment: 4F0D2B96-C205-45D2-B749-910BE8A5BF92.jpeg (Downloaded 16 times)

Last edited on Fri Feb 22nd, 2019 12:31 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline


Hearns is out! 


Attachment: 1A889650-0E6F-4A0E-AF05-36F89881A92C.jpeg (Downloaded 16 times)

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline


Hagler - The Victor! 

Attachment: 3821B069-B7A7-419C-961B-F45D1425A9A5.jpeg (Downloaded 16 times)

Last edited on Fri Feb 22nd, 2019 12:39 am by Papa Voo

khawk
Hall Of Famer


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Canada
Posts: 15423
Status: 
Offline
One of the problems the current fight game has is that now, at the first sign of trouble, they often get stopped. I get why, of course, but such a huge part of boxing is the guys fighting through bad trouble and knockdowns that are brutal, and the current crop probably doesn't get anywhere near the same chances the guys of that era did to get up and go on.
At the same time that is what often makes for a great dramatic fight.
The most immediate example is one of my favourite heavyweight slugfests ever, Ron Lyle vs. George Foreman. That fight could never happen today. Even as it was happening there was more than one moment that the ref could have just waved it off and nobody would have batted an eye.

Blazer
Mr Monday Night!


Joined: Sun Sep 4th, 2011
Location:  
Posts: 5827
Status: 
Offline
The fight doctor Ferdie Pacheco.  Even the announcers and ringside guys had great stories.

One Fan Gang



Joined: Wed Apr 22nd, 2009
Location:  
Posts: 4472
Status: 
Online
Marvin Hagler appears in the Van-Zant music video "I'm A Fighter" from about 1985. The More You Know...

Erick Von Erich

 

Joined: Thu Mar 26th, 2015
Location: Texas USA
Posts: 473
Status: 
Offline
As a kid (b. 1974), even if you didn't watch boxing, it seemed you knew the names. Ali (obviously), Hector "Macho" Camacho, "Marvelous" Marvin Hagler, Ray "Boom Boom" Mancini, "Sugar" Ray Leonard, etc.

Camacho appeared in a Fat Boys video, circa 1987 (Fat Boys have become fairly forgotten, but they had a big "push" on MTV, one summer).

Harald Lederman and Mills Lane even became minor icons, due to boxing's popularity. I think Tim Tomashek was a guest on David Letterman. No way you'd see a lower mid-card "tomato can" boxer on a late night show, nowadays.

I think boxing began to die out in popularity when Buster Douglas knocked out Tyson in early 1990. Tyson had become a modern superhero and even had a Fresh Prince song about him: "I Think I Can Beat Mike Tyson". Then he had the legal problems and each organization began to recognize different "champions". I think someone even recognized Tommy Morrison as their "champion".

I got into George Foreman's comeback and even ordered his PPV bout against Evander Holyfield in 1991. "Hip hip hooray for senior citizens". I marked out when he knocked out Michael Moorer in 1995. Everybody was pumped for the Holyfield/Tyson match in 1997 and it seemed like that might bring some cohesion and popularity back to boxing. But...well that didn't work out.

Erick Von Erich

 

Joined: Thu Mar 26th, 2015
Location: Texas USA
Posts: 473
Status: 
Offline
Oh, one thing I forgot: Lyle Alzado vs. Muhammad Ali, circa 1979 in Mile High Stadium. It was an exhibition bout, but sold a buncha' tickets. I had always thought it was an urban legend, but saw the full bout on YouTube a few years ago and thought: "well I'll be damned. That actually happened".

I suppose a modern comparison might be Von Miller vs. Anthony Joshua. People might buy tickets to see Von Miller fight "Some Guy".

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline


Alexis Arguello

Alexis Arguello, (born April 19, 1952, Managua, Nic.—found dead July 1, 2009, Managua), Nicaraguan professional boxer who was world featherweight, junior lightweight, and lightweight champion between 1974 and 1982.

Arguello, who became a professional fighter in 1968, fought only in his homeland until 1974, when he went to Panama to seek the World Boxing Association’s featherweight title. Arguello lost this match in a 15-round decision to Ernesto Marcel. Later that year, however, he claimed the WBA title by virtue of his 13th-round knockout of Ruben Olivares.  After four successful title defenses at featherweight, Arguello moved up to junior lightweight and knocked out Alfredo Escalera in the 13th round of their 1978 match to gain the World Boxing Council’s (WBC’s) championship title in that division.

At the peak of Arguello’s boxing career, political issues in Nicaragua came to a head. In 1979 civil war in Nicaragua culminated in the overthrow of the Somoza family, and the Sandinista regime took over the country; Arguello’s property and bank account were seized. One of his brothers was killed fighting the Sandinistas, and Arguello, who was living in the United States, went to Nicaragua and fought briefly on the side of the Contras.

He returned to the United States to continue his boxing career and, after eight junior lightweight title defenses, moved up to the next weight division; by defeating Jim Watt on a 15-round decision in 1981, he became WBC lightweight champion. Following four victories by knockout in 1981 and 1982, matches with his title on the line, Arguello next tried to win the WBA’s version of the junior welterweight title, but he failed, losing championship matches by knockout to Aaron Pryor in 1982 and again in 1983. Arguello retired after the second Pryor fight but came back several times for brief periods, finally quitting boxing for good in 1995. In 90 bouts he compiled a record of 82 victories (64 by knockout) and 8 losses. Arguello was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in Canastoa, N.Y., in 1992.

Arguello retired to Nicaragua but had difficulty in adapting to life outside the ring. After his career ended, he battled both depression and drug addiction before turning to politics and becoming mayor of Managua in 2008.


Attachment: BC02D1BA-5E5D-4D2F-977C-FBDA3B469408.jpeg (Downloaded 36 times)

Last edited on Sat Feb 23rd, 2019 01:40 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline

Next boxer up is one who made his name by beating Alexis Arguello.

Aaron “The Hawk” Pryor

From the beginning, Aaron Pryor was at odds with the world. Or perhaps, the world was at odds with him. One of the most exciting fighters during an era – the 1980s – when action was a prerequisite for fame, Pryor matched his unbridled style in the ring with an apocalyptic personal life that kept him in boldface for over a decade. Pryor was an at-risk youth before the term came into vogue. Dysfunction was in his DNA. He was born – out of wedlock – in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1955, to an alcoholic mother, whose moodiness could lead to impromptu gun play. Sarah Pryor occasionally whipped out the nickel-plated hardware when her children became unruly. Years later, she wound up shooting her husband five times, in the kind of supercharged domestic dispute in which the Pryor clan excelled.



Pryor had a family tree whose branches were gnarled by tragedy. Its roots were blood-soaked. One of his brothers Lorenzo was a career criminal who once escaped from Cincinnati County Jail. Another brother David became a transsexual hooker. His sister Catherine stabbed her lover to death after an argument. Pryor also had a half-brother who was shot and paralyzed by his father. As if to solidify the epigenetics involved in the Pryor family – and to concretize the symbolism of the phrase “vicious cycle” – Sarah Pryor had witnessed her own mother shot and murdered by a boyfriend when Sarah was a child.
 
With his mother preoccupied by pint bottles and pandemonium, Pryor found himself on the streets of Mount Auburn and Avalon – where race riots in 1967 and 1968 left ruins in their wake – unsupervised most of the time. In fact, he was virtually homeless, couch-surfing when he could, sleeping in doorways or under awnings, whenever his mother locked him out of the house. As an eight-year-old already at sea in chaotic surroundings, Pryor was molested by a minister. Shame was never far beneath the surface of a man who would eventually earn millions of dollars and worldwide fame.


After losing a decision to Howard Davis Jr. in an Olympic trials box-off, Pryor returned to Cincinnati, at loose ends. In 1976 he made his debut as a professional and earned $400 against an ex-kickboxer, Larry Smith. By contrast, Davis had a contract from CBS in hand worth nearly $300,000 before he had ever stepped into a pro ring. The American TV gold rush had begun and Pryor was unable to stake a claim. To make ends meet, Pryor became the hired help for the stars who had left him far behind: Davis and Sugar Ray Leonard both used him as a sparring partner.
 
Not long after signing Pryor to an exclusive deal, Madison Square Garden – in those days one of the top promotional firms on the East Coast – called a press conference to announce that “The Hawk,” then a lightweight, could not get a meaningful fight. In 1980, Pryor turned to the Robin Hood of prizefighting, Harold Smith, for help. Smith, with money embezzled from Wells Fargo National Bank, managed to lure WBA junior welterwweight titleholder Antonio Cervantes to Cincinnati, where Pryor rebounded from an early knockdown to overwhelm and eventually stop the defending champion, who entered the ring with as many successful title defenses under his belt as Pryor had fights.
 
Like Leon Spinks, the ditzy man-child sent careening through short-lived fame, Pryor often received press coverage that bordered on mockery. Spinks became the target of talk show hosts and a Richard Pryor skit but Aaron Pryor was no less susceptible to lampooning than “Neon” Leon. His pre-hip-hop Kangols, Cazals and DayGlo track suits were ready-made for ridicule. Malapropisms popped out of his mouth like Mentos. The bad press he received, he said, was due to “misrepresentation of my personality.” Later, he removed the gold cap from one of his front teeth, began wearing suits in public and even toted a briefcase from one press junket to another. That did not stop him from making outlandish headlines when his future wife Theresa Adams shot him with a .22 and sent him racing to an emergency room on foot.
 
What made Pryor appealing was a fierce ring style, seemingly at one with a personal outlook that bordered on madness. Pryor scored five consecutive stoppages in defense of his junior welterweight title and, in the process, astonished viewers with his frenzied performances. For Pryor, being knocked down often meant popping right back up to charge at his opponent before the referee could issue the mandatory eight-count. Gaetan Hart, Lennox Blackmoore, DuJuan Johnson, Miguel Montilla, Akio Kameda – all worn down by Pryor and his cyclone attack. Still, Pryor believed respect and riches were eluding him.
 
Three world championships into his career, Alexis Arguello finally broke into the mainstream after stopping heartland teen idol Ray Mancini in a 1981 lightweight title defense. After scoring a brutal 14th round TKO, Arguello captured the imagination of a national television audience by consoling Mancini with a tenderness antithetical to the general mores of a blood sport. You could not ask for a saintlier contrast to Aaron Pryor.
 
Before the bell rings, Pryor shadowboxes, paces, flurries with intensity. Then, as he is being introduced by ring announcer Hector Salazar, he points his gloved fist at Arguello and holds his pose, glowering, for nearly a minute. “I intended to make Alexis believe that I was going to…kill him,” Pryor later recalled. Soon the men meet at ring center and nearly 24,000 spectators watch, spellbound, as Pryor and Arguello abandon themselves to bloodlust for nearly an hour.
 
November 12, 1982, The Orange Bowl, Miami, Florida: Pryor TKO 14 Arguello
 
“After the fight was stopped, Arguello was stretched out on the floor with an oxygen mask held to his face. For the moment, he was not an athlete, not an admirable public figure, but the victim of an accident, as if he had been hit by a drunken driver, or a coal mine roof had fallen on him.” – George Vecsey, New York Times
 There will be no salvaging either man. For both Pryor and Arguello, the future is an illusion. “After I beat Arguello is when I started to lose myself,” Pryor once recalled. “I didn’t know quite who I was for a long time.”


Finally, Pryor has earned the distinction he has craved his entire life. Or has he? Within hours, his greatest accomplishment is eclipsed by the actions of his trainer Carlos “Panama” Lewis. Twice during the bout, Lewis instructs Pryor to drink from what legend tells us was a mysterious black bottle, after the first round and after the 13th. “The Black Bottle” is not black at all, in fact, but a strange Robert Ryman off-white. Grainy video reveals that it seems to be wrapped in athletic tape as if to hide the contents within. Panama Lewis would go on to serve a prison sentence for removing the padding from the gloves of Luis Resto in a 1983 fight against Billy Collins Jr.


Pryor essentially trained himself for the rematch with Arguello. Sparring numberless rounds sans headgear, Pryor was hospitalized with a migraine. Under-conditioned, surrounded by chaos and already battling a drug addiction that would leave him on the brink of death more than once, Pryor batters Arguello in Las Vegas on September 9, 1983, scoring a 10th round TKO and trading the limelight in for a life on the margins.
 
In 1974, The New York Times called cocaine “the champagne of drugs.” It was the narcotic of choice for Hollywood, Wall Street and the international jet set. Necklaces with tiny spoons and razor blades adorning them become fads for movers, shakers and snorters. High Times, Rolling Stone and even Newsweek report on the cocaine scene with breathless enthusiasm. By 1980, however, the Bahamas are so oversaturated in powder that Caribbean drug dealers decide to sell it in a crystallized form that can be smoked. This new derivation, inexpensive and highly addictive, is first called “rock.” Later, when it would ravage inner cities and send the national murder rate skyrocketing, it will be called “crack.” Its first breeding ground in the United States is Miami, Florida.
 
His wife introduces him to crack in 1982. For the next 10 years, Pryor loses himself in a perpetual haze. A Sports Illustrated profile in 1985 reveals Pryor, Death-in-Life, gray and skeletal, his surroundings as dreary as those of bag lady mired in a back alley or a drifter wandering the gutters from day to dire day. For Pryor, nothing mattered now except the rush. He placed his life and his career on a funeral pyre.


“Miami is the drug capital of the U.S. There are drugs at every other door. Living in that environment, I reached out for some help. My wife had divorced me. I was so hurt by rumors of the black bottle that I had no energy. I reached out and certain people did not give me their right hand. They gave me drugs.” – Aaron Pryor


A ramshackle Pryor returned to the ring in 1984. Against limited Nicky Furlano in Toronto, Pryor labored to a 15-round decision and revealed, in the process, a fighter – no, a man – who was beginning to fray. On March 3, 1985, in his last title fight, Pryor struggled to a narrow points win over Gary Hinton, in Atlantic City, for the IBF junior welterweight title. Then he vanished, undefeated, into a permanent midnight.


“I ain’t the Hawk now. The Hawk is dead. I’m a ghost.” – Aaron Pryor, 1985
 
The mid-1980s, neon and glitz for so many, are some of the bleakest years for Pryor. He is divorced for a second time. In October 1986, Pryor is arrested for assaulting his mother. A year later, he is shot and held hostage by a pair of drug addicts before managing to escape. His mother tries to have him committed. In 1988, he tests positive for cocaine. He is in and out of rehab centers. He has surgery to repair a cataract. In September 1989, he is arrested for possession of drug paraphernalia. There are more lawsuits and canceled fights than can be remembered. Pryor went through trainers, managers and promoters the way a hanging judge went through outlaws in the West. Finally after the lost years passed him in a blur, Pryor is sentenced to six months in prison for drug possession. For more than one court appearance, Pryor, who appeared indefatigable in the ring, overslept and arrived late.
 
“I immediately became a night person. There’s no such thing as a crackhead being a ‘day person.’ The crackhead is up all night and sleeps all day.” – Aaron Pryor
 
 
This was not the kind of habit that led to a few weeks in the Betty Ford Clinic or could be overcome by an intervention. It was “Do the Right Thing”/”J is For Junkie”/”Night of the Living Basehead” deterioration. For loose change, a shambolic Pryor shadowboxed on street corners. Occasionally, he even sparred against neighborhood toughs in alleys and backyards. He shuffled from one crackhouse to another, took beatings from conscienceless thugs, suffered sexual degradation, slept on curbsides under harsh lamppost light. Every urban wasteland was a mirror image of another during that era. Crack vials shattered beneath your feet. Abandoned buildings were repurposed for shooting galleries and smoking dens. Crosswalks were ruled by vicious sentinels wearing Timberlands and waving Glocks. All blue hours were splintered by the pop-pop-pop of gunshots, the non-stop wail of sirens and the falling, booming bass beat of Jeeps cruising the risky streets. Then the sun would rise again on chalk outlines, spent shells, sidewalks caked in flaking blood. But you would never think to find someone as accomplished as Aaron Pryor in that netherworld.
 
 
“One time, a dope dealer thought I was so high that he could manipulate me into believing that I owed him $5,000. I argued with him and he pulled a gun on me and started firing at me point blank. I pulled out my own gun and started firing back. In a flash, there were two other guys by his side firing automatic weapons at me. It was a good old Wild West show. The bullets were whizzing by me and putting holes in my car. We must have been only 20 feet from each other. When I emptied my gun, I got in the car and drove off. That was the kind of madness I was living in.” – Aaron Pryor
 
 
More than two years after the Hinton fight, Pryor faced journeyman Bobby Joe Young at the Sunrise Musical Theater, in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. It was too much for a disintegrating Pryor. Years of squalor had left him with a gray pallor. It was now 1987 and his vision, suspect for years, may finally have deteriorated to the point where Pryor should not have been allowed in the ring. Before the fight even began, Pryor had his mouth bloodied in a scuffle with Young’s trainer Tommy Parks. Young scored a knockdown in the first round, staggered Pryor repeatedly and floored the ex-champion hard in the seventh with an overhand right. As referee Bernie Soto tolled the mandatory eight-count, a wobbly Pryor dropped to one knee and made the sign of the cross. Then Soto reached “10.”
 
 
“Lord, I’m so low down, baby, I declare I’m looking up at down.” – Big Bill Broonzy
 
 
His umpteenth comeback, in 1990, was a travesty. A sleazy fly-by-night promoter named Diana Lewis decided that Pryor would be enough of a sideshow attraction to make the harsh phrase “blood money” a remunerative reality. Nearly blind in one eye, Pryor was granted a license to fight in Wisconsin, whose Department of Licensing and Regulation ruled that denying the tattered Hawk the right to fight was tantamount to discrimination. Pryor stopped Darryl Jones, his pal of many years, in three farcical rounds and returned to the streets.
 
 
“All of it had to do with drugs. With crack. He has been assaulted – mentally, physically, sexually. He’s been beaten, not just with fists but with guns, sticks, bats. Some of these leeches have taunted him to shadowbox for them. They have mocked him, humiliated him, threatened him. All for what? A little rock of cocaine? For that trash, they’ve made him beg. Made him do unimaginable…” – Cincinnati trainer Mike Brown, 1993
 
 
Lying in a crackhouse, seemingly on the verge of death, Pryor finally has an epiphany. He is rushed to a hospital with bleeding ulcers and undergoes surgery. When he is released after two weeks – now sporting a long scar across his stomach, the last of several life marks – he heads straight for a church and to a new beginning, one that lasts for more than 20 years. Aside from a few national television appearances alongside his son Aaron Pryor, Jr., a journeyman super middleweight, the Hawk no longer has the spotlight on him. This new anonymity is a sign of serenity – something Pryor finally earned with blood and sweat, his last victorious fight. Aaron Pryor died of heart disease on October 9, 2016, at the age of 60.
 
 
 

Attachment: 67CB7C85-C5F6-425B-B5B3-5D54451B78E5.jpeg (Downloaded 29 times)

Last edited on Sun Feb 24th, 2019 04:41 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline

Two things come to my mind when speaking about Aaron Pryor:

-His wild swinging and reckless flurries seeking to destroy his opponent.

-The “black bottle” incident. (The bottle was not even black 😁) The bottle was more gray in color. 


Good highlight clips of The Hawk

https://youtu.be/6sQkdcJW5FY

Clip of the “bottle” incident

https://youtu.be/00Z1QZaHqZ8

Attachment: B975D70C-F9C3-443D-AAB5-6077993E100E.jpeg (Downloaded 29 times)

Last edited on Sun Feb 24th, 2019 04:17 pm by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline

Mike Weaver vs. John Tate
March 31, 1980

Talk about going down like a ton of bricks!   


Thirty Years Later: Weaver vs. Tate Remembered

By Lee Groves

March 31, 2010

Thirty years ago today, a single left hook from Mike Weaver rewrote history in ways that couldn’t have been fathomed at the time. 

It turned Weaver from no-hope challenger to instant champion and separated John Tate not only from his senses but also from potential superfight riches. 
The dramatic finish that occurred at 2:15 of the 15th round produced shock waves that continue to ripple throughout boxing history. It serves as a definitive example of how a fighter can rescue himself from a seemingly hopeless situation and achieve the ultimate dream. 

On the flip side, it also serves as a cautionary tale for those who think they have a fight in his hip pocket and the sports world by the tail. 

That wondrous hook changed the lives of two men in triumphant and tragic ways and the following is a look back at the event that started it all.

On March 31, 1980. boxing was a sport that enjoyed a solid place in the mainstream consciousness. ABC cleared out its entire Monday night schedule to air a championship quadruple-header emanating from three diverse sites. 

The two highest profile fights of the night would take place in Landover, Md., where Sugar Ray Leonard made his first WBC welterweight title defense against Dave “Boy” Green and Las Vegas when WBC heavyweight champion Larry Holmes met the unbeaten Leroy Jones.
Leading off the four-plus hour telecast was a startling upset in Knoxville, Tenn., as perennial challenger Eddie Gregory dethroned WBA light heavyweight champion Marvin Johnson with an 11th round TKO. 

But most of the 12,769 who crowded into the Stokley Athletics Center on the University of Tennessee campus that evening came to see “Big” John Tate, a native of Arkansas who was now a regional icon. 

Following a successful amateur career that was capped by a bronze medal in the 1976 Olympics, Tate continued his roll into the pros as he disposed of Walter Santemore (twice), Eddie “The Animal” Lopez, Bernardo Mercado and Johnny Boudreaux to set up his first crossroads fight against Duane Bobick. 

Like Tate, Bobick was a highly decorated amateur star whose Olympic dreams were derailed by Cuban legend Teofilo Stevenson, the only difference being the year (1972 vs. 1976) and the round of the knockout (round three to round one). 

Despite his 48 victories (42 inside the distance), Bobick was best known for his 58-second knockout loss to Ken Norton in May 1977. Bobick had won eight straight after Kallie Knoetze stopped him in three rounds a year earlier and his experience was supposed to test Tate’s skill and composure.

What the nationwide audience instead witnessed was a blowout. Tate – usually so methodical that he was nicknamed “The Machine” – jumped on Bobick from the start and hammered him into submission after scoring two knockdowns. The ironic time – 2:15 of round one.

The spectacular showing earned Tate a spot in a four-man WBA tournament in 1979 to determine the successor for the retiring Muhammad Ali. Tate traveled to South Africa and knocked out Knoetze in eight while Gerrie Coetzee scored a stunning first round knockout of ex-champ Leon Spinks in Monte Carlo. Tate then returned to South Africa later in the year and decisioned Coetzee before 86,000 fans to win the belt.

Tate’s first challenger would be Weaver, who became the WBA’s mandatory challenger largely on his stirring but losing challenge to WBC champion Larry Holmes nine months earlier at Madison Square Garden.

Before the Holmes fight, Weaver was best known for an Adonis-like body that belied his weight of 207 ½ lb. He got his first taste of boxing when he served at Camp Lejeune between 1968 and 1971 and he turned pro in September 1972.

Overmatched early in his career, Weaver lost three of his first four fights and after 12 outings his record was a mediocre 6-6. Weaver slowly found his stride by winning eight straight fights but was knocked down a few pegs with back-to-back losses to Stan Ward and Leroy Jones.

Weaver eventually earned the notice of the WBC – and Holmes – by scoring five straight knockouts, including triumphs over Bernardo Mercado and Ward.

Still, the Holmes-Weaver match was so lightly regarded that it landed on a fledgling cable channel called HBO instead of the three broadcast networks. The title of one magazine article previewing the fight perfectly captured the mood of the populace – “Mike Who?”
Weaver ended up showing everyone who he was on June 22, 1979 as he pushed an ailing Holmes toward his physical and emotional limits. Holmes, however, once again demonstrated his giant fighting heart by knocking Weaver down with a vicious uppercut late in the 11th and pounding away at the challenger in the 12th until referee Harold Valan intervened.

If ever a loss enhanced a fighter’s standing, it was Weaver with the Holmes fight and the shot against “The Easton Assassin’s” titular counterpart was his reward. Another potential perk for the Tate-Weaver winner – especially if it was Tate – was a big-money fight with Ali, who decided that permanent retirement wasn’t yet in the cards.

The sudden and surprising end to Gregory-Johnson set the stage for what was to follow, only no one could have known it at the time. 

Going in, the conventional wisdom was that the 25-year-old Tate – a perfectly proportioned 6-4, 232-pounder – would use his three-inch height and two-and-a-half inch reach advantages to break down the plodding and phlegmatic challenger over the long haul. Though Tate had scored 16 knockouts in 20 previous wins, he wasn’t regarded as a one-shot artist.

On the other hand, the 21-9 (13 KO) Weaver was armed with knockout drops, especially in his left hook. Unlike Tate, Weaver had major problems in terms of output. He usually started slowly and didn’t speed up much after that but somewhere along the way he managed to slip in a big one or two and turn the tide for good.

With the crowd loudly chanting “Big John Tate,” their hero sprinted out of the gate. He used his bulk to force Weaver backward and his quicker hands to repeatedly bounce punches off the challenger’s face.

A hard right cross-left jab jolted Weaver midway through round two but most of the time Tate kept Weaver at bay with long, stabbing and accurate jabs. Weaver sneaked in an occasional hook, but most of the time he either whiffed or found himself entangled in Tate’s long arms.

The crowd roared in the third as Tate cut loose with combinations whose speed belied his massive size. Tate again tasted Weaver’s vaunted hook, but did little more than blink for a brief moment before resuming his assault.

Tate continued to pound away energetically in the fourth, and ABC’s Keith Jackson marveled at how a man of Tate’s size could maintain such a hard pace.
The blows, though numerous, had no discernable effect on Weaver. The challenger kept plugging away whenever he could and he even managed to open a small cut around Tate’s right eye.

Between rounds four and five Tate’s trainer Ace Miller urged his man to pace himself, and his charge dutifully obeyed by circling and firing long-range punches. That alone was enough to win the round because Weaver could not pull himself out of his offensive rut.
Tate returned to the attack in round six as an early right stunned the laid-back Californian. The defending champion was feeling so confident that he broke out into a modified Walcott shoulder shuffle.

Meanwhile, Weaver was showing little of the nerve and verve that powered his challenge against Holmes but he was getting in his fair share of jabs. Those did little to counteract Tate’s steady work, and midway through the seventh Tate amplified his growing points lead by pummeling Weaver along the ropes. The punches didn’t hurt Weaver in the classic sense but they did hurt his cause in a big way.

Weaver had to know he was trailing badly on the scorecards but the attitude he projected suggested he wasn’t overly concerned. A right uppercut jolted Weaver’s head in the eighth and Tate’s precise relentlessness carried the ninth as the crowd revved another chorus of “Big John Tate” chants.

Jackson reported in the 10th that Weaver’s corner was growing more frustrated with their man’s effort.

“You’re fighting for the heavyweight championship if the world and you’re not throwing any punches,” Jackson quoted the corner as saying. “You’ve got no chance to win the fight if you don’t go out and throw some punches.”

But it was Tate who was throwing the punches in the 10th. He pushed Weaver toward the ropes and belabored him with a two-fisted assault that brought back little response. Tate was doing whatever he pleased and Weaver did little to stop him from doing so.
“As you can see, Weaver didn’t go there to fight, he just went there to try to survive,” Holmes told Howard Cosell from his dressing room between rounds 10 and 11. “I think the people viewing this know who the real champion is. Larry Holmes is the world’s champion, the baddest guy in the whole world. And when I destroy Leroy Jones tonight they won’t have anything to say. I’m a fighting champ and I’ll destroy all of them. Tate does not impress me.”

He impressed everyone else with his array of skills, if not his punching power. Tate dominated the 11th with more long-range boxing and between rounds Weaver’s corner again implored their man to throw more punches. They - along with many other observers - couldn’t fathom how a fighter competing for a piece of boxing’s greatest prize could appear so listless and devoid of passion.

Weaver finally broke through the wall of Tate’s dominance in the 12th. Moments after Tate landed a short right to the chin a minute into the round, Weaver connected with an arcing hook that sent Tate reeling into the ropes. With the crowd suddenly jolted from their complacency it took Tate several long seconds to slap on a saving clinch. 
Weaver swung for the fences and missed wildly as Tate propped himself on the ropes, grabbing at every opportunity in order to clear his buzzing head. The crowd’s chants now had a imploring, nervous tone and between rounds Miller tried to prick Tate’s pride by ordering him to “act like a G** ***n champion.”

Curiously, Weaver allowed Tate to escape in the 13th by refusing to press his advantage. He simply followed the backpedaling champion around the ring and enabled Tate to re-establish his equilibrium.

As if his mathematical hole wasn’t deep enough, Weaver applied another shovelful in the 14th by losing a point for a low blow. Still, Weaver had one of his better rounds as he wobbled Tate with a hook in the final 23 seconds that had the champion sagging into the ropes.

Going into the last round, Weaver trailed 138-133, 137-134 and 136-133. The deeply religious Weaver silently recited the 23rd Psalm as he sat in his corner for the last time, for he knew that only a miracle could spare him the 10th – and perhaps most disappointing – loss of his pro career.

His corner, however, added another source of motivation, this much closer to home: “Your mama’s watching. Let’s go to work.”

Tate knew all he had to do was stay upright to retain his title. The combination of his heavy work rate and Weaver’s late-round damage had taken a toll on his stamina and he spent the first portion of the round clutching and grabbing whenever he got the chance. But for the first time in the fight, Weaver showed genuine urgency as well as a sustained attack.
With less than a minute to go, Weaver bulled the bigger but wearier man toward the ropes near the champion’s corner. Tate tried to shoulder Weaver away, but was met with a return shove that caused him to bounce into the strands.

It was here that Weaver was about to earn his spot in heavyweight championship lore.
Weaver made the most of the ropes’ boomerang effect as he first dug a right to the pit of Tate’s stomach, then uncorked a gorgeous short left hook that exploded off the side of the champion’s face.
Upon impact Tate’s body was transported to a semi-conscious purgatory as his torso swayed to the left and his arms awkwardly splayed sideward. 

Weaver finished the job with a final head snapping right to Tate’s dangerously exposed chin. Tate’s magnificently sculpted 232-pound body pitched forward and slammed the ground like a leaden log and showed just as much life as referee Magana tolled his superfluous count.
“Tate goes down on his face!” Jackson shouted. “Weaver hit him with a left hook and Tate’s down! He’s just beginning to move… the fight is over! Weaver’s knocked him out in the 15th round!” 

The shock and amazement at this turn of events jolted the collective consciousness; what had looked to be a routine title-retaining decision victory for Tate had suddenly turned into an ending for the history books. 

For Weaver, this incredible turnabout would be a touchstone moment and his ticket to boxing immortality. Unfortunately for the man nicknamed “Hercules,” his reign was marked by a pair of one-year layoffs triggered by outside-the-ring machinations that culminated in a highly controversial 63-second stoppage loss to Michael Dokes. 

Despite all the messiness that followed, the purity of Weaver’s title-winning triumph remains untouched. He fought on for 20 more years, challenging twice more for the title before retiring at age 49 following a sixth round TKO to a 51-year-old Holmes.
For Tate, the Weaver loss triggered a long and precipitous fall from grace. He became a punch line for comedians and commentators alike, especially after Tate suffered a second consecutive KO loss to the unheralded Trevor Berbick less than three months later. 
One particularly low point came in the May 1981 issue of Ring when an infamous poll not only named Tate the “worst” heavyweight champion of all time, his photo graced the cover. To be fair, the photo was used to tout George Vecsey’s feature story entitled “What ever happened to Big John Tate?” but wound up serving a dual purpose.

Tate built up a 10-fight win streak between February 1981 and August 1983 but he never again got close to challenging for a title. He retired for three years before staging a five-fight comeback from April 1986 to March 1988, but because he fought as high as 293 pounds it didn’t serve much purpose. A 10 round loss to Noel Quarless ended Tate’s career for good.

A 43-year-old Tate died from injuries sustained in a one-car accident in April 1988 that saw him suffer a stroke while driving and crash into a utility pole. His demise sparked a series of rhetorical questions because the start of his downfall was so easily ascertained.
What would Tate’s life have been like had he made it to the final bell against Weaver? Would he have fought Ali? Would Ali, in turn, have been spared from the beating he would suffer against Holmes had he lost to Tate? Or would Ali have suffered the same fate in a unification fight with Holmes had he beaten Tate?

If Tate beat Ali, what impact would that have had on his confidence, his standard of living or how he is perceived in history? Would he still be alive today?
There are similar “what-if” scenarios for Weaver.

Would a lopsided loss to Tate have prevented Weaver from getting a third title opportunity? Would he have been willing to take the long road back to another title shot and would he have emerged unscathed? How would Weaver be remembered had he lost a lopsided decision – or would he even be remembered at all?

The fates of boxing are cruel and kind at the same time and the events of March 31, 1980 show just how true that is.


Attachment: 3ADD2219-2BBF-4206-B4FE-943807858C74.jpeg (Downloaded 20 times)

Last edited on Sun Feb 24th, 2019 05:32 pm by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Great fight!  

Tate just needed to make it through one more round. 

Here is that last round: 

https://youtu.be/lKGXdj2gCvU

Attachment: 9AF02D73-7AEB-4273-9C7D-866531C7D88E.jpeg (Downloaded 20 times)

Last edited on Sun Feb 24th, 2019 04:36 pm by Papa Voo

khawk
Hall Of Famer


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Canada
Posts: 15423
Status: 
Offline
Night of Champions...I remember it vividly. Good stuff.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
khawk wrote: Night of Champions...I remember it vividly. Good stuff.

That is the stuff I miss.  Nothing close to it today with the MMA stuff. 

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline

Mike Weaver vs Michael Dokes 

Weaver loses title with a controversial “quick” TKO

October 12, 1982 


Mike Weaver wandered around the edge of the ring pounding his fists together, a dazed and quizzical expression on his face. In the center of the ring, the same Las Vegas ring where one month earlier Korean lightweight Duk Koo Kim had suffered a fatal beating, Michael (Dynamite) Dokes lay face down, his legs jerking in ecstasy. A crowd of whooping followers swarmed over him. Meanwhile, Referee Joey Curtis was hurriedly escaping through the ropes. At 1:03 of the first round, Curtis had halted last Friday's bout between Weaver and Dokes and awarded the WBA heavyweight title to the 24-year-old challenger, Dokes. "Weaver was hurt bad. That's what I saw," Curtis said before disappearing.

But observers close to the action at Caesars Palace thought Curtis had made the wrong decision. Dr. Donald Romeo, the ringside physician, said, "They shouldn't have stopped it. The referee was wrong. Weaver was fine. The fact is he's just a notoriously slow starter." Sugar Ray Leonard thought Curtis must have "panicked." Larry Holmes, who like Leonard was on hand as a TV commentator, opined, "Curtis couldn't referee my kids in a baseball game."

The WBA official monitoring the fight, Nick Kerasiotis, said only that he was "very surprised" at the decision and that he wanted to review the films. The 30-year-old Weaver's handlers interrupted their outrage to quickly file a protest with the WBA and suggested to all who would listen that the fight had been fixed by promoter Don King, a Dokes adviser. (The WBA is expected to urge a rematch, but not to rule no contest and reschedule the fight, as the Weaver camp demanded.) King grinned like a demon and said little. King always grins like a demon, although he usually says a lot.

Dokes, who had been top-rated by both the WBA and WBC, rushed at Weaver at the opening bell and pummeled him. The big blow that began Weaver's fall was a left hook. Almost simultaneously Weaver fogged Dokes with a strong left hand of his own to the forehead, but Dokes's punch had by far the more telling effect. He followed it with a right and another left hook, and Weaver was down. Though he rose quickly and calmly took the mandatory eight count, thereafter he never made it five feet from where he got up. An 18-punch fusillade pinned him on the ropes. He was unable, or unwilling, to throw anything in return. Suddenly the hovering Curtis stepped between the fighters as though breaking them from a clinch. Instead, astonishingly, he led Dokes away and lifted his hands. The new champion sprang high in the air and crashed to the canvas, in the process banging his head harder than Weaver had been able to do. It seemed at first that Dokes, lying there twitching, was the one knocked out. Dr. Romeo's first concern, in fact, was for Dokes, not Weaver. "Dokes was on the floor in some kind of trance, some kind of euphoric state," he said.


When they realized the fight was over, the 4,500 fans, having paid as much as $50 a seat for the minute of action, began to boo and then chant "Bull——! Bull——!" and "Fix! Fix!" Meanwhile, a brawl broke out in the ring between the two camps. Dokes had demanded the championship belt that Weaver had worn into the ring. Audrin Weaver—why is it that brothers of fighters always seem to take losses so much more personally than the fighters themselves?—swiped at Dokes, precipitating a chaos that, coupled with the crowd's growing disgruntlement, persuaded ringmaster Chuck Hull that he would be best advised not to announce the TKO at all. He fled from the ring on Curtis' heels.


When the Caesars Palace musclemen at last got things calmed down, the dethroned champion's anger had abated, and he had regained his usual expression of blank beatitude. A still delirious Dokes had his arms around Weaver's neck. He was kissing him repeatedly. "I told him I loved him," said Dokes later. "And he said he'd ask God to bless me." Weaver was then carried on shoulders from the hall in a slow parade of moral victory.


Curtis appeared at King's postfight bash to press his case for the quick TKO. "I asked [Weaver] after the knockdown if he was all right, and he didn't give me a correct answer," Curtis said. Earlier Weaver had maintained that the referee had never talked to him, had never looked into his eyes to check him out. "I asked him, 'Are you O.K.?' " Curtis said hotly, "and he gave me a feeble 'O.K.,' so I decided to let it go on for a few more punches."


"You don't stop a champion without speaking to him," Weaver had charged.


"If he says I never said anything to him, he was more out of the picture than I thought," said Curtis.


Weaver and Curtis ended up calling each other liars. In truth, Curtis did speak to Weaver after the knockdown, but, as Weaver claimed, he didn't do so again, nor did he make any further effort to examine Weaver before declaring Dokes the winner.


A 10-year veteran with nine title fights to his credit, the 55-year-old Curtis had been chosen as referee only that morning at a meeting of the Nevada State Athletic Commission. "Kim was all they stressed at that meeting," he said. "And Kim was always in the back of my head." A day later, Roy Tennison, executive secretary of the commission, delivered a rare reproof, saying, "I think the ref overreacted because of all the safety talk. I recommend a rematch based on his stopping the fight too early and on Weaver's reaction [in the ring]. Weaver was real sharp and knew what he was doing."


Weaver, in fact, didn't do much of anything Friday night, which seems to be a pattern with him. He had fought only twice since he had knocked out John Tate for the title in March 1980, just when it seemed that Tate was about to add another loss to Weaver's mediocre record (22-9-0 upon winning the crown). His two title defenses were mildly courageous—particularly when he stopped Gerrie Coetzee after being hurt—but altogether lackluster. He has been totally eclipsed in the none-too-broad shadow of Holmes, the WBC title-holder who TKO'd Weaver in 1979. According to Bobby Lewis, Dokes's owlish trainer with the bristle-brush mustache, Weaver looks like Hercules—a nickname he despises—but fights like Hamlet: reflectively, if at all. Lewis had already beaten Weaver, with Duane Bobick in 1974, and was training Ron Lyle when Weaver came in as a sparring partner. "He left after about three days," Lewis recalls. "I didn't think he had the heart. So the plan was, go get him."


Dokes, out of Akron, had shown the speed of some welterweights on his way to a 25-0-1 record. He hasn't been knocked down since his amateur days when, at 17, he ran up against the great Teofilo Stevenson. That fight is notable in retrospect, because Dokes came out against the Cuban the same way he would against Weaver, wild-eyed and snorting. Stevenson dropped him in the first, but Dokes came back the same way in the final two rounds and roughed up Stevenson badly before losing a split decision. As a pro, Dokes's decisions over Tex Cobb and George Chaplin were undistinguished, but he had impressive KOs of such unworthies as Ossie Ocasio, John L. Gardner, Harry Terrell, Lynn Ball and Franco Thomas, whom he put away in an aggregate of 11 rounds. By Friday night he went in as nearly a 3-1 favorite.

The new champion didn't show up at the press conference following his triumph—he went back to the hotel and climbed into a bathtub that had been half filled with Taittinger champagne. Weaver, showing a three-inch line of swelling over his right temple, did appear, sitting next to his manager, Don Manuel, and Audrin, both of them red-eyed. Manuel said, "The last thing I told Mike before the bell rang was to watch out for the early rush. 'If Dokes throws a lot of punches, and you don't throw any, they'll stop the fight.' It was just like it was scripted." But Manuel stopped short of the word fix. Dokes, who appeared later in a champagne-soaked red robe outside his room, didn't, though. When asked about the charges, he said fiercely, "Do you think the knockdown was a fix? Do you? Do you?" Then he smiled as broadly as possible for someone who isn't Don King. "Did you want another Duk Koo Kim?" he asked.

Attachment: 8F6AF29F-B40F-47FC-88EB-DA285485EE86.jpeg (Downloaded 25 times)

Last edited on Sun Feb 24th, 2019 05:47 pm by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline

Michael Dokes Obituary


Died August 11, 2012

(What a lifestyle!) 

Michael Dokes, who used his swift, punishing fists to become the world heavyweight boxing champion in 1982 and, 15 years later, to beat his live-in girlfriend so savagely that he was convicted of attempted murder, died on Saturday at a hospice in Akron, Ohio. He was 54.
The cause was liver cancer, his brother Kevin said.

Dokes, who was known by the nickname Dynamite, aspired to a larger-than-life persona, wearing fedoras and mink coats, and entering the ring blowing kisses and tossing roses to women in the crowd. He claimed to have bathed in $20,000 worth of Champagne.
But his career was a roller coaster of ups and downs remarkable even for his rough-and-tumble sport. His mother pushed him toward boxing to stop him from fighting on the streets of Akron, and he won national amateur heavyweight titles as a teenager. In 1977, at 18, he fought a 35-year-old Muhammad Ali in a highly publicized exhibition match in Miami, and in 1982, at 24, he scored a technical knockout of Mike Weaver in just over a minute in Las Vegas to win the World Boxing Association heavyweight crown.

He lost the title nine months later to Gerrie Coetzee, and later confessed that he had used cocaine less than 48 hours before the fight. He was convicted of at least three charges of drug possession and trafficking, and was in and out of narcotics rehabilitation programs. Boxing Insider quoted him saying that he once trained for a fight on “Jack Daniel’s and cocaine.”

He compiled a 53-6-2 professional record with 34 knockouts. Some of his fights won high praise. Ring magazine called his 1989 bout with Evander Holyfield, who scored a technical knockout in the 10th round, the best heavyweight battle of the 1980s. Holyfield said Dokes’s hands were the swiftest he had encountered.


Other fights were disasters. In a title bout against Riddick Bowe in 1993 at Madison Square Garden (the gate receipts of $1.4 million set a Garden record), Dokes was beaten so brutally in the first round that the referee stopped the fight. Dokes had downed a huge plate of pasta before the match, The Plain Dealer of Cleveland reported.


“The past is history, the future isn’t here yet, and the present is linguine and clam sauce,” he told the newspaper.


Michael Marshall Dokes was born on Aug. 10, 1958, in Akron, where he grew up. He was runner-up for the Amateur Athletic Union and the Golden Gloves titles in 1974 before winning the A.A.U. title in 1975 and the Golden Gloves in 1976.


In the 1975 Pan American Games, he lost a 3-2 decision to Teófilo Stevenson, the powerful Cuban heavyweight who died in June. Dokes’s amateur record was 147-7, including victories over the future heavyweight champions John Tate and Greg Page.  Dokes, who was 6 feet 3 inches and had a 78-inch reach, never won a fight as a heavyweight champion. 

His rematch with Weaver was scored a draw, meaning that he kept the title.

In 2000, three years after his retirement from boxing, he pleaded guilty in a Nevada state court to attempted murder, second-degree kidnapping and intent to commit sexual assault for attacking Sandra Kaye Cummings, his girlfriend of more than nine years. Her injuries, which included a broken nose and cheekbone, were so severe, the police said, that she could not be recognized in a driver’s license photograph. He was sentenced to 10 years, and after being paroled in 2008 he returned to Akron.

In addition to his brother Kevin, Dokes is survived by his sister, Alisa Dokes Williams, and his brothers Steven and Charles.


Attachment: 88F3F1C7-B05F-48E1-BC69-09FD60906556.jpeg (Downloaded 19 times)

Last edited on Sun Feb 24th, 2019 08:55 pm by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline

Ray “Boom Boom” Mancini vs Duk-Koo Kim

November 13, 1982 




The tragic title fight that changed boxing


Article from November 6, 2012


SEOUL — Thirty years ago this month, South Korean boxer Kim Duk-Koo entered a Las Vegas ring for a world championship bout that would end with his death, trigger at least one suicide and change the sport forever.

For a generation of South Koreans, millions of whom watched live on television, the fight between Kim and world lightweight champion, Ray “Boom Boom” Mancini, remains a powerful memory.
Now a new book and accompanying documentary that coincide with the 30th anniversary hope to shed fresh light on the bout, its tragic aftermath and the impact it had on the lives and families of its two protagonists.For Kim, then 23 and fighting for the first time in the United States, the glitz of Caesar’s Palace with its celebrity audience including the likes of Frank Sinatra, was a different universe from his impoverished upbringing in Korea.

“I remember when we landed in Las Vegas for the fight,” his trainer, Kim Yoon-Gu, now 56, recalled.

“The city was all lit up at night. It was like landing on a garden of flowers in the desert. We’d never seen anything like it,” he told Agence France-Presse at the boxing gym he runs in Seoul.

US boxing commentators had pretty much written Kim Duk-Koo off before the November 13, 1982 clash with Mancini, a powerful 21-year-old from Youngstown, Ohio making his second defense of the world title.

But Kim was confident. Before leaving Seoul he had a carpenter rig up a mock coffin which he said he would use to bring back Mancini after the fight.

Unimpressed with such bravado, his trainer stomped it to pieces which he then hid under the ring in Kim’s training camp.



A brutal fight


The fight when it came was a particularly brutal one.


For 13 rounds, the two men went toe-to-toe in a slugging match that left both with badly swollen faces and struggling to see through bruised, puffed-up eyes.
At the end of the 13th, Kim Yoon-Gu tried to lift his fighter, telling him Mancini was exhausted and exhorting him to put in one last effort to finish him off.
“He clenched his teeth, nodded and said ‘Yes, I’ll do that’. And that was it. That was the last thing he ever said,” Kim said.

At the beginning of the 14th, Mancini connected with a straight right that snapped Kim’s head back and sent him crashing to the canvas.


The Korean managed to haul himself up by the ropes to beat the count, but referee Richard Green stepped in to stop the fight.

Kim Yoon-Gu had been tending to his corner and missed the actual knockout blow, but when he saw Kim on the ground, he knew at once that the fight was over.
“He was obviously hurt, but at that time we had no idea it was so serious,” he said.


Back in his corner, Kim collapsed and was taken from the ring on a stretcher to hospital where he was diagnosed with a blood clot on the brain and underwent emergency surgery.
He lapsed into a coma from which he never recovered and four days later he died.

On the flight back to South Korea, a traumatised Kim Yoon-Gu locked himself in the toilet and “cried and cried until we landed. 


“I thought about quitting the sport entirely. In the end, I decided to stick with it, but it was a very, very difficult time,” he said at his gym where photos and posters of Kim Duk-Koo adorn the walls.




Suicide, depression and redemption

The consequences of the Kim-Mancini bout were far-reaching and tragic in their own right.
Four months after her son’s death, Kim’s distraught mother killed herself by drinking a bottle of pesticide.

Four months after that, referee Richard Green also took his own life, although there was no indication that his suicide was linked to the outcome of the fight for which he was never held in any way responsible.

Mancini, a devout Catholic, endured a prolonged period of depression and, although he fought again, was never the same boxer.

“In all the obvious ways, he was haunted,” American sportswriter Mark Kriegel, author of a new biography of Mancini titled “The Good Son,” told AFP in a telephone interview.

“He also got over it. The complications for Ray have more to do with the fact that the rest of the world didn’t get over it and continued using that fight as a kind of reference point for his life,” Kriegel said.

Kriegel’s book, and an accompanying documentary of the same name, climax with an emotional reunion in June last year between Mancini and Kim’s family.

Kim’s fiancee, Lee Young-Mee, had been pregnant at the time of the 1982 title fight and seven months later gave birth to a son, Kim Jiwan, now 29.

While being interviewed by Kriegel for the book, Jiwan had suggested a trip to the United States to meet with Mancini.

“As full of duty and obligation as Ray was, he wasn’t going to turn down a request from the son of the man who, without intention, died at his hands,” Kriegel said.


At the meeting in Mancini’s home, Jiwan admitted to the “hatred” he once felt for the boxer, before absolving him of any blame.

“I think it was not your fault,” he said.

The Kim-Mancini bout proved to be a watershed in boxing, triggering a series of major changes to the sport.

Championship bouts were reduced from 15 to 12 rounds, the standing eight-count was introduced and the medical tests required of boxers before a fight were overhauled.




Attachment: 38DAD506-5840-4CFC-B10F-063D76CAE6A8.jpeg (Downloaded 11 times)

Last edited on Tue Feb 26th, 2019 12:53 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Duk-Koo Kim

Attachment: 9DF16164-220E-4F69-B1CC-2D3C5C84B139.jpeg (Downloaded 12 times)

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
The Weigh-In

Attachment: 0B0B7248-DBE5-4ED3-933A-ED1EA69A0EA3.jpeg (Downloaded 21 times)

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Slugfest

Attachment: 4897C028-1404-43D4-A4E4-22D17FEFBBA8.jpeg (Downloaded 21 times)

Last edited on Tue Feb 26th, 2019 12:58 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Down goes Kim 

Attachment: A3C3450C-88D1-464F-B547-C7AA12717353.jpeg (Downloaded 19 times)

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Match over

Attachment: 893C4B3C-E55B-460A-8F68-7FB172CDA6D4.jpeg (Downloaded 22 times)

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Tragedy In The Ring 


The suicides of Kim’s mother and referee Richard Harris makes the incident even more depressing.  

Attachment: 51F909AD-9BD5-4891-8E53-843F26019658.jpeg (Downloaded 22 times)

Last edited on Tue Feb 26th, 2019 01:07 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline

Ray “Boom Boom” Mancini


Raymond Michael Mancini (born March 4, 1961), best known as Ray "Boom Boom" Mancini, is an American former professional  who competed from 1979 to 1992, and has since worked as an actor. He held the WBA lightweight title from 1982 to 1984. Mancini inherited his distinctive nickname from his father, veteran boxer Lenny “Boom Boom” Mancini who laid the foundation for his son's career. In 2015, Ray was inducted into the International Boxing Hall Of Fame.

Mancini, an Italian American, was born Raymond Michael Mancino in Youngstown, Ohio on March 4, 1961. Boxing played a prominent role in the Mancini family history. Mancini's father, Lenny Mancini (the original "Boom Boom"), was a top-ranked contender during the 1940s. Lenny Mancini's dream, however, was dashed when he was wounded during World War II. Although Lenny Mancini returned to boxing, limitations resulting from his injuries prevented him from fulfilling his potential.


Lenny inspired young Mancini to develop his boxing skills and encouraged him to train at a gym when he was quite young.

On October 18, 1979 he made his professional debut by defeating Phil Bowen with a first-round knockout. His whirlwind punching style caught the attention of network executives at several American television networks, and he became a regular on their sports programming. During this time Mancini defeated some notable boxers including former United States champion Norman Goins in March 1981. 

On April 30, 1980, Mancini defeated Bobby Sparks with a knockout at 1:28 in the first round for the regional Ohio State Lightweight title. Over a year later on May 16, 1981, Mancini won his first major title by defeating Jorge Morales for the WBC-affiliated NABF Lightweight championship when the referee determined that Morales could not continue after the 9th round. Two months later, he successfully defended the title against Jose Luis Ramirez after a unanimous decision. Mancini's first attempt at a world title came in his next bout on October 3 when he was pitted against Akexis Arguello  for his Word Boxing Council lightweight title. The event was selected by many (including The Ring and ESPN) as one of the most spectacular fights of the 1980s. Mancini gave Argüello trouble early and built a lead on the scorecards, but Argüello used his experience to his advantage in the later rounds and stopped Mancini in the 14th round.

Mancini would rebound from the loss to Arguello by winning his next two bouts, including a second (and last) successful defense of his NABF Lightweight title against Julio Valdez (10th-round TKO) which would earn him another chance at a world title.

On May 8, 1982, in a match held at The Aladdin in Las Vegas, he challenged the new World Boxing Association lightweight champion, Arturo Frias.  Fifteen seconds into the fight, Frias caught Mancini with a left hook to the chin and another combination made Mancini bleed from his eyebrow. Mancini recovered and dropped Frias right in the center of the ring with a combination. Dazed, Frias got back up but Mancini immediately went on the offensive and trapped Frias against the ropes. After many unanswered blows, referee Richard Greene stopped the fight at 2:54 in the first round, and the Mancini family finally had a world champion.

On November 13, 1982, a 21-year-old Mancini met 23-year-old South Korean challenger Duk-Koo Kim.   Kim had struggled to make the 135lb weight limit, and had to lose several pounds shortly before the fight. The title bout, at Caesers Palace in Las Vegas, was televised live at 1pm PST on CBS Sports.  It was, according to many observers, a fight filled with action. Mancini finally won by TKO in the 14th round. Moments after the fight ended, Kim collapsed and fell into a coma, having suffered a subdurao hematoma. He died four days later. The week after his death, the cover of Sports Illustrated magazine showed Mancini and Kim battling, under the title Tragedy in the Ring.


Mancini began the process of getting his life back together by once again putting on gloves. He went to Italy to face British champion George Feeney. Mancini won a 10-round decision.

He defended his title two more times. First, on September 15, 1983, he beat Peruvian challenger Orlando Romero by a knockout in nine rounds at New York’s Madison Square Garden to achieve a lifelong dream of fighting at that building, and then, on January 1984, in a bout with former world champion Bobby Chacon, which was broadcast on HBO, Mancini defeated Chacon after referee Richard Steele stopped the fight in the third round with blood dripping from Chacon's left eye.


In June 1984, Mancini, still recovering from the emotional trauma of Kim's death, fought Livingston Bramble to retain his title in BuffaloNew York.  This time however, Mancini came out on the losing end, defeated after 14 intense rounds. Mancini lost his title, but not before a fierce effort that resulted in an overnight stay at Millard Fillmore Hospital and got 71 stitches around one eye.


Mancini returned to the ring twice to attempt to regain his world title. In a rematch with Bramble, Mancini lost the fight by one point on all three judges' scorecards in a 15-round decision.  His next attempt came in March 1989, when he lost to Hector “Macho” Camacho in a split decision, Mancini had one final fight in April 1992, against former lightweight champion Greg Haugen. Mancini lost when referee Mills Lane stopped the fight in the seventh round.

Mancini retired officially in August 1985 at the age of 24.  However, he returned to the ring to fight Héctor Camacho in 1989 and had one final fight in 1992. A made-for-television movie based on Mancini's life aired in the 1980s.  The former champion was able to keep 75 percent of his $12 million in phrse money, which enabled him to pursue a broad range of interests in retirement.


Mancini has a son also called Ray who appeared in the YouTube reality series SummerBreak.


Mancini appeared in and produced a handful of films, and became a fight analyst for the Fox reality series Celebrity Boxing. Mancini, who as of 2007 resides in Los Angeles, owns the El Campeon Cigar Company and operates two movie production companies.


Mancini practices Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and holds a purple belt in the martial art.  He appeared in David Mamet’s MMA film Redbelt. He also appeared in the 2000 remake Body and Soul.


Mancini produced Youngstown: Still Standing in 2010, which premiered at the 34th Cleveland International Film Festival on March 24. The documentary film featured his hometown friend, actor Ed O’Neill and included Jim Cummings, Kelly Pavlik, Jay Eilliams, Andrea Wood and Mancini himself, among many other Youngstown natives and locals. John Chechitelli – another Youngstown native – directed and edited the 89-minute-long film. It recounts the history of Youngstown, Ohio from its founding in 1797 to the present.


Mancini is fluent in Italian. He and Orlando Romero reunited in 2013 at Lima,Peru.

Attachment: 8AE6EB67-D385-44A1-9BBA-461B03EA4747.jpeg (Downloaded 19 times)

Last edited on Tue Feb 26th, 2019 04:38 pm by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline

Livingston Bramble 

Born 09/03/60
    Bramble defeated Ray Mancini by a fourteenth-round TKO to win the WBA Lightweight Championship on June 1, 1984. Bramble was a 4 to 1 underdog.  
    In his first title defense, Bramble defeated Ray Mancini by a fifteen-round unanimous decision on February 16, 1985. All three judges had Bramble winning by just one point. 
    In his second title defense, Bramble defeated Tyrone Crawley by a thirteenth-round TKO on February 16, 1986. Crawley was the WBA’s No. 1-ranked lightweight contender.
    Bramble lost the title in his third defense to former WBC  Lightweight Champion Edwin Rosario on September 26, 1986. Rosario, a 4 to 1 underdog, won by a second-round knockout. Entering the Rosario fight, Bramble had a record of 24-1-1. 
    Bramble boxed until 2003 and finished with a record of 40-26-3.Bramble has a record of 3-1 (2 KOs) in world title fights.
    Bramble has a record of 2-8-1 against former, current or future world titlists:  won against Ray Mancini (twice) Lost against Edwin Rosario, Freddie Pendleton, Charles Murray (twice), Roger Mayweather,  Kostya Tsyzu, James “Buddy McGirt, Rapheal Ruelas. Drew against Freddie Pendleton

Attachment: 2C2E0AF6-684B-4080-9BB0-58A2A4A2CA68.jpeg (Downloaded 19 times)

Last edited on Tue Feb 26th, 2019 04:40 pm by Papa Voo

Big Garea Fan

 

Joined: Wed Mar 4th, 2009
Location:  
Posts: 2546
Status: 
Offline
My Dad and I were big boxing fans back in the 80s. Every Saturday afternoon, we would watch whatever boxing matches were being aired on the networks (ABC Wide World of Sports, NBC Sportsworld, CBS Sports Saturday). We were too poor to afford HBO.

Our local Boys Club was having a boxing demo / tournament at the local shopping mall on the morning of the Mancini vs Koo-Kim fight. My Dad and I went to the Boys Club tournament and liked what we saw. My Dad was all set to sign me up for the boxing program starting the following Saturday. I was so pumped!

We went home, had some lunch, and settled in to watch the Mancini vs. Koo-Kim fight. It was a heck of a fight. Koo-Kim was actually beating Mancini in the early rounds. Mancini started to beat the daylights out of the guy in the later rounds but Koo-Kim wouldn't go down. The referee finally stopped the fight after Koo-Kim had managed to pull himself to his feet after a brutal knockdown in the 14th round. Koo-Kim later collapsed in his corner, had to be stretchered from the ring, and lapsed into a coma. Four days later, Koo-Kim was reported dead.

My father changed his mind about letting me box after that fight. We would still watch the matches but "no son of his" would ever step into a boxing ring.

Last edited on Tue Feb 26th, 2019 06:49 pm by Big Garea Fan

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Great story!  

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline

Larry Holmes (The Easton Assassin)

Larry Holmes (born November 3, 1949) is an American former professional boxer who competed from 1973 to 2002. He grew up in Easton, Pennsylvania which gave birth to his boxing nickname of "The Easton Assassin".

Holmes, whose left jab is rated among the best in boxing history, held the WBC heavyweight title from 1978 to 1983, The Ring magazine and lineal heavyweight titles from 1980 to 1985, and the inaugural IBF heavyweight title from 1983 to 1985. He made 20 successful title defenses, placing him third all time, behind only Joe Louis at 25 and Wladimir Klitschko at 22. He also holds the record for the longest individual heavyweight streak in the modern boxing history. Holmes is one of only five boxers—along with Joe Frazier, Ken Norton, Leon Spinks and Trevor Berbick—to defeat Muhammad Ali; he is the only one to have stopped Ali.

Holmes won his first 48 professional bouts, including victories over Norton, Ali, Earnie Shavers, Mike Weaver,  Gerry Cooney, Tim Witherspoon,  Carl Williams, and Marvis Frazier, and falling one short of matching Rokcy Marciano’s career record of 49–0 when he lost to Michael Sptinks in 1985. Holmes retired after losing a rematch to Spinks the following year, but made repeated comebacks. He was unsuccessful in three further attempts (against Mike Tyson, Evander Holyfield and Oliver McCall) to regain the heavyweight title, the last in 1995. Holmes fought for the final time in 2002, against the 334lb Eric “Butterbean” Esch and ended his career with a record of 69 wins and 6 losses. He is frequently ranked as one of the greatest heavyweights of all time and has been inducted into both the International Boxing Hall of Fame and World Boxing Hall of Fame.

After compiling an amateur record of 19–3, Holmes turned professional on March 21, 1973, winning a four-round decision against Rodell Dupree. Early in his career he worked as a sparring partner for Muhammad Ali, Joe Frazier, Earnie Shavers, and Jimmy Young. He was paid well and learned a lot. "I was young, and I didn't know much. But I was holding my own sparring those guys", Holmes said. "I thought, 'hey, these guys are the best, the champs. If I can hold my own now, what about later?'"

Holmes first gained credibility as a contender when he upset the hard-punching Earnie Shavers in March 1978. Holmes won by a lopsided twelve-round unanimous decision, winning every round on two scorecards and all but one on the third. Holmes's victory over Shavers set up a title shot between Holmes and WBC Heavyweight Champion Ken Norton in Las Vegas on June 9, 1978.

The fight between Holmes and Norton was a tough, competitive fight. After fourteen rounds, each of the three judges scored the fight dead even at seven rounds each. Holmes rallied late in the fifteenth to win the round on two scorecards and take the title by a split decision.

In his first two title defenses, Holmes easily knocked out Alfredo Evagilista and Ossie Ocasio. His third title defense was a tough one. On June 22, 1979, Holmes faced future WBA Heavyweight Champion Mike Weaver, who was lightly regarded going into the fight sporting an uninspiring 19–8 record. After ten tough rounds, Holmes dropped Weaver with a right uppercut late in round eleven. In the twelfth, Holmes immediately went on the attack, backing Weaver into the ropes and pounding him with powerful rights until the referee stepped in and stopped it. "This man knocked the devil out of me," Holmes said. "This man might not have had credit before tonight, but you'll give it to him now.”

Three months later, on September 28, 1979, Holmes had a rematch with Shavers, who got a title shot by knocking out Ken Norton in one round. Holmes dominated the first six rounds, but in the seventh, Shavers sent Holmes down with a devastating overhand right. Holmes got up, survived the round, and went on to stop Shavers in the eleventh.

His next three defenses were knockouts of Lorenzo Zanon, Leroy Jones, and Scott LeDoux
On October 2, 1980, at Caesers Palace in Las Vegas, Holmes defended his title against Muhammad Ali, who was coming out of retirement in an attempt to become the first four-time World Heavyweight Champion. Holmes dominated Ali from start to finish, winning every round on every scorecard. At the end of the tenth round, Ali's trainer, Angelo Dundee, stopped the fight. It was Ali's only loss without "going the distance" for a judges' decision.  After the win, Holmes received recognition as World Heavyweight by The Ring magazine.

Ali blamed his poor performance on thyroid medication which he had been taking, claiming that it helped him lose weight (he weighed 217½, his lowest weight since he fought George Foreman in 1974), but it also left him drained for the fight.

Holmes seemed to show signs of regret, or at least sadness, in punishing Ali so much during the fight. He appeared in a post-fight interview with tears in his eyes. When asked why he was crying, he said that he respected Ali "a whole lot" and "he fought one of the baddest heavyweights in the world today, and you cannot take credit from him."

After eight consecutive knockouts, Holmes was forced to go the distance when he successfully defended his title against future WBC Heavyweight Champion Trevor Berbick on April 11, 1981. 
In his next fight, two months later, Holmes knocked out former Undisputed World Heavyweight Champion Leon Spinks in three rounds. On November 6, 1981, Holmes rose from a seventh-round knockdown (during which he staggered into the turnbuckle) to stop Renaldo Snipes in the eleventh.

[size=On June 11, 1982, Holmes defended his title against Gerry Coney, the undefeated #1 contender and an Irish-American. The lead-up to the fight had many racial overtones. Holmes said that if Cooney wasn't white, he would not be getting the same purse as the champion (both boxers received $10 million for the bout).  Although Cooney tried to deflect questions about race, members of his camp wore shirts that said "Not the White Man, but the Right Man."   In their fight previews, Sports Illustrated] and Time put Cooney on the cover, not Holmes. President Ronald Reagan had a phone installed in Cooney's dressing room so he could call him if he won the fight.  Holmes had no such arrangement. Lastly, boxing tradition dictates that the champion be introduced last, but the challenger, Cooney, was introduced last.  

The bout was held in a 32,000-seat stadium erected in a Caesar's Palace Parking lot, with millions more watching around the world. After an uneventful first round, Holmes dropped Cooney with a right in the second. Cooney came back well in the next two rounds, jarring Holmes with his powerful left hook. Holmes later said that Cooney "hit me so damned hard, I felt it—boom—in my bones."  Cooney was tiring by the ninth, a round in which he had two points deducted for low blows. In the tenth, they traded punches relentlessly. At the end of the round, the two nodded to each other in respect.  Cooney lost another point because of low blows in the eleventh. By then, Holmes was landing with ease. In the thirteenth, a barrage of punches sent Cooney down. He got up, but his trainer, Victor Valle, stepped into the ring and stopped the fight.  

After the fight, Holmes and Cooney became close friends.

Holmes' next two fights were one-sided decision wins over Randall “Tex” Cobb and ex-European champion Lucien Rodriguez. On May 20, 1983, Holmes defended his title against Tim Witherspoon, the future WBC and WBA Heavyweight Champion. Witherspoon, a six to one underdog and with only 15 professional bouts to his name, surprised many by giving Holmes a difficult fight. After twelve rounds, Holmes retained the title by a disputed split decision.

On September 10, 1983, Holmes successfully defended the WBC title for the sixteenth time, knocking out Scott Frank in five rounds. Holmes then signed to fight Marvis Frazier, son of Joe Frazier, on November 25, 1983. The WBC refused to sanction the fight against the unranked Frazier. They ordered Holmes to fight Gregg Page, the #1 contender, or be stripped of the title. Promoter Don King offered Holmes $2.55 million to fight Page, but the champion didn't think that was enough. He was making $3.1 million to fight Frazier and felt he should get as much as $5 million to fight Page.

Holmes had an easy time with Frazier, knocking him out in the first round.  The following month, Holmes relinquished the WBC championship and accepted recognition as World Heavyweight Champion by the newly formeed the Intermational Boxing Federaton. 

Holmes signed to fight Gerrie Coetzee, the WBA Champion, on June 15, 1984 at Caesar's Palace. The fight was being promoted by JPD Inc., but it was canceled when Caesar's Palace said the promoters failed to meet the financial conditions of the contract. Holmes was promised $13 million and Coetzee was promised $8 million. Even after cutting the purses dramatically, they still couldn't come up with enough financial backing to stage the fight.  Don King then planned to promote the fight, but Holmes lost a lawsuit filed by Virginia attorney Richard Hirschfeld, who said he had a contract with Holmes that gave him right of first refusal on a Holmes-Coetzee bout. Holmes then decided to move on and fight someone else.

On November 9, 1984, after a year out of the ring, Holmes made his first defense of the IBF title, stopping James “Binecusher” Smith on a cut in the twelfth round. In the first half of 1985, Holmes stopped David Bey in ten rounds for his 19th title defense. 
His next against Carl “The Truth” Williams was unexpectedly tough. The younger, quicker Williams was able to out-jab the aging champion, who was left with a badly swollen eye by the end of the bout. Holmes emerged with a close, and disputed, fifteen-round unanimous decision.

On September 21, 1985, Holmes stepped in the ring looking to equal Rocky Marciano’s  49-0 career record and to make his twentieth successful title defense. His opponent was looking to make history as well. After winning the undisputed championship at light hewvyweight, Michael Spinks decided to move up in weight and try to become the second fighter after Bob Fitzsimmons to win titles at both light heavyweight and heavyweight. An elder statesman who had tried for these latter honors, Archie Moore, predicted an easy win for Holmes: "I'm afraid Larry will chew him up. Michael may be faster than Larry, but you can only go so fast."  Despite the assessment, it indeed would be Spinks whose historical destiny would be fulfilled, albeit controversially, as he defeated Holmes via unanimous decision to become the first reigning light heavyweight champion to win the heavyweight title.  After the fight, a bitter Holmes said, "Rocky Marciano couldn't carry my jockstrap."

Holmes had a rematch with Spinks on April 19, 1986. Spinks retained the title with a disputed fifteen-round split decision. The judges scored the fight: Judge Joe Cortez 144–141 (Holmes), Judge Frank Brunette 141–144 (Spinks) and Judge Jerry Roth 142–144 (Spinks.). In a post-fight interview with HBO, Holmes said, "the judges, the referees and promoters can kiss me where the sun don't shine—and because we're on HBO, that's my big black behind."

On November 6, 1986, three days after his 37th birthday, Holmes announced his retirement.

Attachment: 91408D05-E827-4AA5-A815-30199E72066A.jpeg (Downloaded 19 times)

Last edited on Tue Feb 26th, 2019 10:22 pm by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline


Larry Holmes vs. Muhammad Ali


Octiber 2, 1980





Attachment: ECE7A151-C451-4BAA-A038-19C1F708B056.jpeg (Downloaded 18 times)

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Pitiful ending to a legendary career


Attachment: 4C12D68F-7C45-447E-B96D-A6B7E7F36412.jpeg (Downloaded 18 times)

khawk
Hall Of Famer


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Canada
Posts: 15423
Status: 
Offline
Shavers punching power is legendary. Holmes said that Shavers hit him so hard in that fight that it woke him up almost immediately as he hit the canvas. A little less on the blow and he would have been out cold.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Renaldo Snipes vs. Larry Holmes


November 6, 1981


“Imminent Danger”


    The fight was billed as "Imminent Danger." 
    Holmes was such a heavy favorite that there was no betting line on the fight. 
    Holmes was paid $1.1 million, while Snipes got $175,000. 
    There was a crowd of 14,103 at the Civic Arena. 
    The fight was televised live in prime time on ABC-TV. 
    Early in the seventh round, Snipes dropped Holmes with a right. Holmes got up quickly and fell face first into a neutral-corner turnbuckle.  
    Forty-five seconds into the eleventh round, a Holmes right sent Snipes reeling sideways into his corner. Holmes moved to him quickly. Two rights and a hook to the body pinned Snipes to the corner. Holmes hammered three powerful rights to the head. As he was loading up to throw a fourth, Ortega stopped the onslaught. 
    While Holmes and Snipes were being interviewed by Howard Cosell after the fight, Holmes' brother Jake got into a fight with Snipes' manager, who thought the fight was stopped prematurely. Snipes then went after Holmes, and Cosell ducked for cover. During the melee, which was joined by a host of security guards, Snipes was pushed back against the Rev. Jim Williams, his trainer, who wielded a pair of scissors he intended to use to snip the tape from Snipes' hands. Instead, the scissors accidentally opened a deep cut in Snipes' left forearm that required 40 stitches.


Attachment: BE548179-825F-4E07-81BD-FBAEC4C3E79C.jpeg (Downloaded 13 times)

Last edited on Wed Feb 27th, 2019 01:24 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
I remember a lot from this event because it was in Pittsburgh. Leading up to the fight, it was viewed as just a tune-up for Holmes to keep fresh for his build up to meet Cooney. Larry looked bad falling into the turnbuckle and Snipes was standing toe-to-toe with him.  
I remember the crowd turning into an all-out Snipes cheering section as the fight got into the later rounds.  

I still think the ending of the match was somewhat controversial for the punishment that had been witnessed upon both fighters earlier in the match.  But, Holmes was measuring up Snipes before every punch before it was stopped which made it look bad. 

I still laugh at the scrum that occurred during the post-fight interviews with Cosell, of course, stirring the pot. 


Here is the link to the fight and the post-fight scrum. 

Myron Cope doing the ring announcing!!! 

https://youtu.be/giWnDfmk_iE

**Date on youtube video is incorrect. 

Attachment: B3F972D6-FFDE-41D4-9F1A-53DB95C455AB.jpeg (Downloaded 15 times)

Last edited on Wed Feb 27th, 2019 01:45 am by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline

 Larry Holmes vs. Gerry Cooney 

The Pride vs. The Glory

June 11, 1982

Attachment: CCEFD915-D2B4-4DA0-82CB-634196D27828.jpeg (Downloaded 19 times)

Last edited on Wed Feb 27th, 2019 04:24 pm by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline




Larry Holmes had been the WBC heavyweight champion since 1978, when he beat Ken Norton by a fifteen-round split decision at the Caesers Palace in Las Vegas. Over the course of his illustrious career, on the way to almost tying the great Rocky Marciano’s record of 49-0, losing in the 49th fight, a decision to the "Jinx" Michael Spinks, fought such fighters as Ossie Ocasio, Mike Weaver, Trevir Berbick, Leon Spinks and, most notably, Muhammad Ali. 


Gerry Cooney, on the other hand, had been a professional fighter since 1977, and he was able to beat boxers such as Jimmy Young and others. The turning point of his career came when he beat Ken Norton, in May 1981, by knockout in round one at the Madison Square Garden in New York. 


Anticipation over a Holmes-Cooney confrontation began to take shape in early 1981, but the fight took over a year to happen, partly because 1981 in particular was a very busy year for boxing with many other big fights, partly because Holmes was obliged to defend against Berbick, Spinks and Renaldo Snipes in that order. Cooney only had one fight in 1981, against Norton. Holmes-Cooney was originally scheduled for March 1982, but was postponed until June when Cooney injured his back in training.


By 1982, promoter Din King and manager Dennis Rappaport began one of the most massive and racially toned campaigns in boxing history to raise public interest for a fight between Holmes and Cooney. After they were both signed to fight, an intense promotional tour followed. Holmes and Cooney attended press conferences at several US cities, Cooney was shown on the cover of Time Magazine, Hollywood stars took an interest in the fight (Sylvester Stallone in particular hung out with Gerry Cooney, others, such as Woody Allen, attended the fight live) and Cooney was cast as "The Great White Hope". There had not been a white world Heavyweight champion in 22 years, and Cooney would try to change that. white supremacist groups had announced they would have "agents" ready to shoot at Holmes the moment he entered the ring, and Black groups retaliated by answering that they would also have armed people on hand in case Holmes was attacked. Because of this, there were police snipers on the roofs of every major hotel surrounding the fight's venue, once again, the Caesars Palace hotel and casino. Snipers were used because the fight was held at the hotel's parking lot; any attacker could have been easily shot by police snipers.The fight was televised live on closed-circuit and pay-per-view television all over the world. A week after the bout, it was re-broadcast on HBO, and later still, on ABC-TV.


The Fight

Wilfred Gomez knocked out Juan Antonio Lopez in ten rounds to retain his WBC super bantamweight title in the semi-final fight, and Holmes and Cooney then took center stage without any incidents. Holmes versus Cooney was refereed by Mills Lane. The announcer that night named Holmes first. Some thought that this was unprecedented; it is tradition in boxing that the challenger be named first and the champion last. The announcement was considered shameful and intensely disrespectful toward the champion Holmes by the boxing community. In fact, when Holmes had challenged Norton for the title, Norton had been introduced first. Nevertheless, when the boxers touched gloves before the first round began, Holmes told Cooney, "Let's have a good fight."


Holmes dropped Cooney in round two, but Cooney got up and landed a damage-causing shot to the body by the end of round four. Holmes and Cooney fought closely from rounds five to eight, trading punches in mid-ring. This was the point where Cooney's inactivity started affecting him, however, and Holmes again dropped the championship hopeful in round thirteen, which proved to be the final round. By round ten, Cooney's punches began landing low, and this caused him to fall further behind on the judges' scorecards, referee Lane deducting three points from him for the infractions.


By round thirteen, Cooney seemed to believe that he would lose the fight and was just trying to last the fifteen round distance.  He had suffered a cut on his left eye and was taking heavy punishment. Midway through the round, a Holmes cross landed flush on Cooney's left cheek, and Cooney's legs buckled. He landed against the ropes, near his corner, and Holmes moved in, intent on finishing his job. Cooney's trainer, Victir Valle, prevented him from doing so, however, by throwing a towel from Cooney's corner, signifying that they were quitting.


The Aftermath

Cooney had a series of problems after this fight, and he fought sporadically until 1990, when he retired for good after being knocked out in two rounds by George Foreman. Holmes, on the other hand, was Heavyweight champion until he lost his belt to Michael Spinks in 1985. He retired in 1986, but has made several comebacks since.


HBO presented a documentary on the fight as part of its Legendary Nights series on memorable boxing bouts.


Holmes and Cooney are now very good friends[ and Holmes has helped Cooney with Cooney's organization, F.I.S.T., which helps former boxers get other jobs and medical insurance after they retire.

Attachment: CB280724-AA9E-4F2D-AB47-2AF960FE0A14.jpeg (Downloaded 18 times)

Last edited on Wed Feb 27th, 2019 04:41 pm by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
The Match

Attachment: C3E4D30F-75D5-42F3-9209-1FD117A0078A.jpeg (Downloaded 18 times)

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
The Match 

Attachment: F4144648-57F1-4AE0-8D1F-65E137495A5F.jpeg (Downloaded 18 times)

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
The End Nearing For Gerry 

Attachment: 5023BA02-EC5B-4F65-9BC1-C1042DC4E51D.jpeg (Downloaded 18 times)

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Down Goes Cooney 

Attachment: 66EE49E8-89DA-4A5C-8686-4DDC476EF4C8.jpeg (Downloaded 18 times)

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Holmes Victorious 

Attachment: 9CFD83B7-4EE7-40F1-93F5-E0A16181B2D7.jpeg (Downloaded 18 times)

Last edited on Wed Feb 27th, 2019 04:48 pm by Papa Voo

khawk
Hall Of Famer


Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: Canada
Posts: 15423
Status: 
Offline
That pic of Holmes hitting Snipes is awesome...wows me every time I see it.

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
khawk wrote: That pic of Holmes hitting Snipes is awesome...wows me every time I see it.

I forgot all about it until I saw it, again! 😂

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Randall “Tex” Cobb Challenges Larry Holmes 
November 26, 1982

Attachment: 6221E208-2D71-4722-B5A8-CD51DBA4CCE6.jpeg (Downloaded 10 times)

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline


Tex Cobb: Took a licking, kept on ticking

By Jason Nark, Daily News Staff Writer/ December 7, 2012 


It has been called an axing, a bloodbath, a devastation, a mauling, a shelling, a mismatch of epic proportions often referred to as the most one-sided fight in professional boxing history.

The thesaurus got quite a workout after the final bell in Houston on Nov. 26, 1982, when Easton's then-unbeaten champion Larry Holmes draped his arm over Randall "Tex" Cobb after pounding his face for 15 rounds in a World Boxing Council heavyweight title bout at the Astrodome.

Reporters, columnists and commentators throughout the country simply couldn't find enough words to describe what Holmes, with his pistonlike jab, did to Cobb's big head that night. But it was the biggest mouth in sports, a man who could always pound a few more gems out of a thesaurus, who may have sealed the fight's fate with his ringside commentary in Houston.

"This is brutalization," the legendary Howard Cosell said in Round 9. "It's a personal opinion, but I think the referee should think about stopping this fight, fast. I mean this is not right. And no, he won't go down. Courage of a lion, but why?"


Holmes was 33 years old but looked a decade younger in the ring, his legendary jab unstoppable, his punches laser-guided until the 15th round, when he took it easy, he said, out of fear for Cobb's life.

"Man, I hit him a thousand times, early. I hit that bleeper, thinking I'm going to get you out of here. He said, 'I'm not going anywhere' He maybe hit me four or five times the entire fight," Holmes said in a recent interview with SportsWeek from his office overlooking the Delaware and Lehigh rivers in Easton. "After the seventh round, after the beating I put on him for the first five or six rounds, I didn't want to knock him out anymore. I didn't want that to be me. I didn't admire that beating he took."

For fans too young to remember the fight, all 15 rounds are available on YouTube with Cosell's commentary. One creative fan condensed the fight down to a 2-minute, video-game-themed version of the highlights.

Cobb's gap-toothed grin was still visible through all the blood and swollen flesh after the fight and by all accounts, he was his usual wisecracking self before, during and after. Cobb was an adopted son of Philadelphia by way of Texas and won the admiration of just about everyone else in the country who watched the fight that night.
Cobb was a more realistic version of "Rocky" in Houston, the "club fighter" swinging wildly at the champ as he plodded forward, eating punch after punch but somehow never faltering. Even Cosell admired his guts.

"Cobb is a tree trunk of man. He can take a punch," Cosell said in Round 4.
Cosell emerged as the big story out of Houston, though, with his 15-round diatribe against referee Steve Crosson, the fans in the Astrodome and the sport of boxing itself. Cosell had covered the sweet science for ABC for 25 years and with Larry Holmes vs. Tex Cobb, he'd seen enough.  It was the last fight he would ever work.

It became clear that Cobb was overmatched early on, and Cosell soon focused his ire on the state of the sport, on the "laissez-faire attitudes of the apologists of boxing." As the closing bell approached, Cosell was suggesting that boxing itself was over."I wonder if that referee understands that he is constructing an advertisement for the abolition of the very sport that he is a part of?" Cosell said at the end of the 14th round.

The Holmes-Cobb bout came at a sensitive time in boxing's bloody history, just 13 days after a relatively unknown South Korean lightweight named Duk Koo Kim squared off against Ray Mancini in Las Vegas. The fight was a war, with Mancini winning by TKO in the 14th round.  Kim went into a coma shortly after the fight and died on Nov. 17, 1982.

The fight prompted many of boxing's sanctioning bodies to reduce bouts from 15 to 12 rounds and call for more stringent prefight medical checks, but not before the Holmes/Cobb fight took place.

Biographer Mark Ribowsky, in his book "Howard Cosell: The Man, the Myth, and the Transformation of American Sports," contends that Cosell had already grown weary of boxing before the Duk Koo Kim tragedy as he watched his dramatic foil, Muhammad Ali, wither away in the ring for years.

The matchup between Larry Holmes, one of the best heavyweights of all time, and a journeyman like Tex Cobb was simply the mismatch Cosell needed, Ribowsky wrote, to hop up on a soapbox and create a narrative that would follow the fight forever.

"He was never dazed nor close to going down," Ribowsky wrote. "Surely it would be folly to say the fight was the biggest mismatch of all time, as many would, because of how Cosell had called it."

Holmes, when asked about Cosell's commentary that night, said he "wasn't about to get inside Howard's mind" but he truly did believe Tex was in trouble.

"He took a mercenary beating that day and it was not necessary," he said.

Referee Crosson recalls getting a phone call at home after the fight from his girlfriend, consoling him over Cosell's harsh criticism.

"She said, 'Are you OK?' I had no idea what she was talking about. I was completely unaware of any controversy," he said during a recent interview from his office in Dallas.
Crosson said he was keenly aware of the Duk Koo Kim tragedy and of Aaron Pryor's brutal, 14th-round TKO of the legendary Nicaraguan brawler Alexis Arguello in Miami, the day before that fight on Nov. 12.

Cobb was also aware of the hysteria surrounding boxing on the night of the fight, Crosson said, and asked him not to stop the fight early because of it.

"He was very aware of the pressure on a referee that night," Crosson said of Cobb. "He said, 'All I ask to let me be carried off on my sword.' "

But Crosson said he didn't cut Cobb any breaks that night. The ringside doctor continuously checked on his cuts and swelling with no major concerns, Crosson said, and despite the barrage of Holmes combinations he took, Tex was never really injured.

"He wasn't defending himself very effectively, but he was trying to defend himself," Crosson said. "I simply saw no place where I could logically stop the fight."

Cobb wasn't the punching bag he appeared to be in Houston. He amassed a respectable 43-7-1 record, including wins over an older but still powerful Earnie Shavers and a split-decision loss to Ken Norton. He played football with Wilbert Montgomery at Abilene Christian, was a professional kickboxer, and once had his arm broken sticking up for his pal, former Daily News columnist Pete Dexter, in a Grays Ferry brawl.

Cobb worked as a bouncer at Doc Watson's and did odd construction jobs in the area while training at Joe Frazier's Gym on North Broad Street. His toughness was supernatural, his barroom philosophies a joy to behold, friends said, and Philadelphia was glad to call him an adopted son for about 20 years, although he also lived in South Jersey.

"He was just a bad bleeper," said George Bochetto, a Center City attorney who represented Cobb in a libel case against Sports Illustrated. "I used to spar with him all the time, and all I can tell you is the man had a head like a slab of concrete."

Both Bochetto and Holmes reached out to Cobb, but he did not return requests for interviews with SportsWeek for this story. Cobb graduated from Temple University in 2008 with a degree in sports management but moved out West in recent years, Bochetto said, and has kept a low profile.

Cobb's unmistakable mug and brutish physique made him a natural fit to play an assortment of goons, thugs and tough guys on television and films. He appeared in hits like "Ace Ventura: Pet Detective," "The Golden Child" and "Liar Liar," and most memorably in the cult favorite "Raising Arizona," in which he played Leonard Smalls, the grime-covered, cigar chewing "lone biker of the apocalypse."

According to his page on the International Movie Database, Cobb has not been in a film or television series in more than a decade.

Cobb often joked about the Holmes fight, that the champion's fists couldn't handle a rematch. He should have been elected to the hall of fame, he joked, for forcing Cosell out of boxing. Cobb never took himself, his skills, or the sport as seriously as Cosell may have.
"I'm a prostitute who sells his blood instead of his derriere," he told Inquirer in 1983. "But that comes with the sport."

Cosell, once the fight was over, couldn't bring himself to talk to Holmes or Cobb or Crosson. He was done.

"I'm not presumptuous enough to think I can kill boxing myself, but I've had it," he told the New York Times a few weeks after the fight.

Boxing would live on, of course, to see a few more stellar heavyweights who captured the world's attention. Mike Tyson obliterated almost everyone who dared to step in the ring with him, including Holmes, but when his life went haywire, the heavyweight division lost a certain luster that it hasn't gotten back.

In the bar he owns beneath his office, Holmes has pictures of heavyweights from his era and other brawlers in black-and-white from more than a century ago. Cobb's picture is up there, too, and Holmes said it deserves to be.


These guys today can't fight. They're boring," Holmes said. "Tex Cobb could kick all their bleeping asses and he sure as hell wasn't boring."

Posted: December 7, 2012 - 9:47 PM










Attachment: 0FB6FF5D-2288-4BAA-A30F-3E69DE06365C.jpeg (Downloaded 10 times)

Last edited on Sun Mar 3rd, 2019 05:36 pm by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Holmes Smashing Cobb

Attachment: 962196BC-2479-420F-AB43-2543BEC227DE.jpeg (Downloaded 10 times)

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
Holmes Beats Down Cobb 

Attachment: 4F984B2E-58D3-4487-BAF9-2D93560F9F8C.jpeg (Downloaded 10 times)

Last edited on Sun Mar 3rd, 2019 05:40 pm by Papa Voo

Papa Voo



Joined: Thu Jan 17th, 2008
Location: Right Outside The Burgh, USA
Posts: 9516
Status: 
Offline
The Face That Made Cosell Quit Covering Boxing 

Attachment: E1D46710-6D62-407F-96B8-5F144F6E36FD.jpeg (Downloaded 9 times)

Last edited on Sun Mar 3rd, 2019 05:41 pm by Papa Voo



UltraBB 1.172 Copyright © 2007-2013 Data 1 Systems