WowBB Forums Home 
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register
WowBB Forums > Sports And Wrestling > General Discussion > Corona Virus...Real or Fake News

 Moderated by: Ron, brodiescomics, beejmi Page:  First Page Previous Page  ...  63  64  65  66  67  68  69  70  71  72  73  ...  Next Page Last Page  
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
Corona Virus...Real or Fake News  Rating:  Rating
AuthorPost
 Posted: Tue Jun 30th, 2020 03:57 pm
  PM Quote Reply
1006th Post
srossi

 

Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: New York USA
Posts: 52750
Status: 
Offline
Kriss wrote: That's complete nonsense, srossi. Flattening the curve is what happened in New Zealand. Strict lockdown. Hospitals were not overwhelmed. Cases went to zero. Life goes back to (almost) normal. Live sporting events with a full stadium of 40,000 unmasked fans are able to take place.
New Zealand's having problems too.  This isn't just going to go away in months.  That's not how viruses work.  And you're talking about a country of less than 5 million so that's a laughable comparison.  That's less than 5 Rhode Islands.  That's not even a good measure since Rhode Island squeezes 1 million people into a studio apartment and New Zealand is so spread out.  You obviously can't do what they did in all of America, and their results are going to prove more and more dubious over the coming weeks/months too.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/jun/28/new-zealands-covid-19-isolation-facilities-under-extreme-stress-review-finds

Last edited on Tue Jun 30th, 2020 06:27 pm by srossi



____________________
This thread was great before AA ruined it.
Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Tue Jun 30th, 2020 07:14 pm
  PM Quote Reply
1007th Post
srossi

 

Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: New York USA
Posts: 52750
Status: 
Offline
Reby Sky with this meme. 

Attachment: B686D7D5-8931-4F07-906E-428F56E6CCAE.jpeg (Downloaded 78 times)



____________________
This thread was great before AA ruined it.
Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Tue Jun 30th, 2020 09:24 pm
  PM Quote Reply
1008th Post
Big Garea Fan

 

Joined: Wed Mar 4th, 2009
Location:  
Posts: 2881
Status: 
Offline
I know a lot can change between now and September, but knowing what you know now and you had to make a decision today, would you send your child back to school in the fall? The American Academy of Pediatrics says we should:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/americas-pediatricians-say-schools-should-reopen-for-the-fall/ar-BB16a4HE?li=BBnb7Kz

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has come out strongly in favor of schools having students return to the classroom in the fall, despite the ongoing risks associated with COVID-19.

“The AAP strongly advocates that all policy considerations for the coming school year should start with a goal of having students physically present in school,” the group said in an update to its guidance for school re-entry.


The guidance asserts that “the importance of in-person learning is well-documented,” and that evidence already has emerged of “negative impacts” on children due to school closures in the spring.

One research paper estimates that the 55 million U.S. children who were out of school due to the coronavirus pandemic may have lost roughly a third of their progress in reading and half of their progress in math.


But children have not simply taken a hit academically, the AAP warned.


Being away from school for a long period of time can lead to social isolation, the group said. Prolonged closures can make it difficult for schools to identify students who are struggling academically, or who may be dealing with domestic abuse, substance abuse, and serious mental health concerns like depression and suicidal thoughts.


School closures also have a direct impact on children’s nutrition and their physical activity levels.


The guidance comes as COVID-19 cases are surging in many states, meaning that risks surround a return to classrooms. The AAP calls for school policies to be “flexible” and “nimble” in responding to new information on the pandemic as it arises, and said education officials should adopt policies that can be easily revised if case counts in a given school or community spike.

But the group also points to data suggesting that COVID-19 has not been as serious in children — and that they may be less likely to spread the virus to each other.


“Although many questions remain, the preponderance of evidence indicates that children and adolescents are less likely to be symptomatic and less likely to have severe disease resulting from SARS-CoV-2 infection,” the guidance said. “In addition, children may be less likely to become infected and to spread infection.”

(One of the more serious post-infection health problems linked to COVID-19 — pediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome ― can be life-threatening to the children it afflicts, but so far such cases in the U.S. have been rare.)

The AAP guidance offered ways schools can balance the desire to resume in-person learning with the need to keep students and staff safe.

The guidance said school districts should do what they can to promote social distancing, while acknowledging the practical challenges that presents, particularly in over-crowded schools already strapped for space. The AAP pointed to some evidence that 3-feet of space between students may be effective in combatting viral spread, particularly if coupled with mask-wearing.


The AAP guidance also said that while universal masking is “ideal,” it is not always realistic, particularly among younger children. While noting that some people have medical exceptions, the group said that school staff and older students — those in middle or high school — generally can wear cloth masks ”safely and consistently,” and should be encouraged to.


Several states have begun to roll out their plans for the upcoming academic year, including New Jersey and Connecticut, that aim for the re-opening of in-person classrooms.


But others, like New York City — once the epicenter of the pandemic in the U.S. — have yet to firm up plans, hinting at the strong likelihood of a hybrid model combining some remote learning and some in-person classes.


Ultimately, whenever school districts determine that in-person learning can resume, teachers should be ready to deal with significant setbacks in children’s academic, social and emotional development in the wake of last spring’s abrupt closures, the AAP said.

“Schools will need to be prepared to adjust curricula and instructional practices accordingly,” the AAP said, “without the expectation that all lost academic progress can be caught up.”

Last edited on Tue Jun 30th, 2020 09:26 pm by Big Garea Fan

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Tue Jun 30th, 2020 10:01 pm
  PM Quote Reply
1009th Post
gwlee7
Hall Of Famer


Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location: Lewisville, Texas USA
Posts: 5413
Status: 
Offline
This is a mess. And it’s going to continue to be a mess for a while.

As an educator, I am at loss as to what the best course of action should be.



____________________
I just think it's amazing that Trump is really on Twitter all day, personally writing this shit. He's about 3 beers away from joining S&W and getting into a flame war with Ports.----srossi
Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Tue Jun 30th, 2020 11:30 pm
  PM Quote Reply
1010th Post
Franchise
Low key big hog


Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location: Cincy, Ohio
Posts: 4538
Status: 
Offline
https://coloradosun.com/2020/06/30/police-protests-coronavirus-spread/



____________________
"Beginning this week, Nitro is going head-to-head with Thunder in Australia" - The Wrestling Observer Newsletter: January 22, 2001
Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Wed Jul 1st, 2020 03:25 am
  PM Quote Reply
1011th Post
freebirdsforever2019



Joined: Sat Nov 23rd, 2019
Location:  
Posts: 449
Status: 
Offline
Big Garea Fan wrote: I know a lot can change between now and September, but knowing what you know now and you had to make a decision today, would you send your child back to school in the fall? The American Academy of Pediatrics says we should:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/americas-pediatricians-say-schools-should-reopen-for-the-fall/ar-BB16a4HE?li=BBnb7Kz

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has come out strongly in favor of schools having students return to the classroom in the fall, despite the ongoing risks associated with COVID-19.

“The AAP strongly advocates that all policy considerations for the coming school year should start with a goal of having students physically present in school,” the group said in an update to its guidance for school re-entry.


The guidance asserts that “the importance of in-person learning is well-documented,” and that evidence already has emerged of “negative impacts” on children due to school closures in the spring.

One research paper estimates that the 55 million U.S. children who were out of school due to the coronavirus pandemic may have lost roughly a third of their progress in reading and half of their progress in math.


But children have not simply taken a hit academically, the AAP warned.


Being away from school for a long period of time can lead to social isolation, the group said. Prolonged closures can make it difficult for schools to identify students who are struggling academically, or who may be dealing with domestic abuse, substance abuse, and serious mental health concerns like depression and suicidal thoughts.


School closures also have a direct impact on children’s nutrition and their physical activity levels.


The guidance comes as COVID-19 cases are surging in many states, meaning that risks surround a return to classrooms. The AAP calls for school policies to be “flexible” and “nimble” in responding to new information on the pandemic as it arises, and said education officials should adopt policies that can be easily revised if case counts in a given school or community spike.

But the group also points to data suggesting that COVID-19 has not been as serious in children — and that they may be less likely to spread the virus to each other.


“Although many questions remain, the preponderance of evidence indicates that children and adolescents are less likely to be symptomatic and less likely to have severe disease resulting from SARS-CoV-2 infection,” the guidance said. “In addition, children may be less likely to become infected and to spread infection.”

(One of the more serious post-infection health problems linked to COVID-19 — pediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome ― can be life-threatening to the children it afflicts, but so far such cases in the U.S. have been rare.)

The AAP guidance offered ways schools can balance the desire to resume in-person learning with the need to keep students and staff safe.

The guidance said school districts should do what they can to promote social distancing, while acknowledging the practical challenges that presents, particularly in over-crowded schools already strapped for space. The AAP pointed to some evidence that 3-feet of space between students may be effective in combatting viral spread, particularly if coupled with mask-wearing.


The AAP guidance also said that while universal masking is “ideal,” it is not always realistic, particularly among younger children. While noting that some people have medical exceptions, the group said that school staff and older students — those in middle or high school — generally can wear cloth masks ”safely and consistently,” and should be encouraged to.


Several states have begun to roll out their plans for the upcoming academic year, including New Jersey and Connecticut, that aim for the re-opening of in-person classrooms.


But others, like New York City — once the epicenter of the pandemic in the U.S. — have yet to firm up plans, hinting at the strong likelihood of a hybrid model combining some remote learning and some in-person classes.


Ultimately, whenever school districts determine that in-person learning can resume, teachers should be ready to deal with significant setbacks in children’s academic, social and emotional development in the wake of last spring’s abrupt closures, the AAP said.

“Schools will need to be prepared to adjust curricula and instructional practices accordingly,” the AAP said, “without the expectation that all lost academic progress can be caught up.”

We are 50/50 on sending my soon to be 2nd grader back in September. Might be Daddy home school for a while.

Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Wed Jul 1st, 2020 08:42 am
  PM Quote Reply
1012th Post
Kriss
Citizen of nowhere


Joined: Wed Dec 12th, 2007
Location: Parts Unknown
Posts: 8001
Status: 
Online
srossi wrote: Kriss wrote: That's complete nonsense, srossi. Flattening the curve is what happened in New Zealand. Strict lockdown. Hospitals were not overwhelmed. Cases went to zero. Life goes back to (almost) normal. Live sporting events with a full stadium of 40,000 unmasked fans are able to take place.
New Zealand's having problems too.  This isn't just going to go away in months.  That's not how viruses work.  And you're talking about a country of less than 5 million so that's a laughable comparison.  That's less than 5 Rhode Islands.  That's not even a good measure since Rhode Island squeezes 1 million people into a studio apartment and New Zealand is so spread out.  You obviously can't do what they did in all of America, and their results are going to prove more and more dubious over the coming weeks/months too.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/jun/28/new-zealands-covid-19-isolation-facilities-under-extreme-stress-review-finds

Okay.... a much better example of flattening the curve vs. not flattening the curve. EU population is 445 million vs. 331 million in the US.


Attachment: Corona.PNG (Downloaded 64 times)



____________________
“Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain
Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Wed Jul 1st, 2020 01:49 pm
  PM Quote Reply
1013th Post
KGB

 

Joined: Wed Jul 4th, 2012
Location:  
Posts: 1570
Status: 
Offline
Children should absolutely be back in school and without restrictions.  Of all the things we know about Chinese flu, one of the most indisputible is that it has little effect on the young.  Schools reopened in many Western countries in April/May with no observable effect on infection rates.  Some will claim the schools need to be closed to protect elderly teachers, but case studies have shown that infected children have an extremely low rate of transmission, particularly if they're asymptomatic. 
 
This article from The Hill outlines the several reasons why schools need to be reopened.  This passage in particular needs to be spread far and wide:
 
The death of even one child is tragic, of course. Yet, it must be kept in mind that as many as 600 children in the United States died from seasonal influenza in 2017-18, according to CDC estimates, while the CDC’s estimate for COVID-19 fatalities number just 12. A just-released JAMA Pediatrics study flatly states: “Our data indicate that children are at far greater risk of critical illness from influenza than from COVID-19.” If the COVID-19 hazard sets the new standard for health safety, the country will need to close its schools each year from November until April to guard against influenza. 



____________________
Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Wed Jul 1st, 2020 01:51 pm
  PM Quote Reply
1014th Post
KGB

 

Joined: Wed Jul 4th, 2012
Location:  
Posts: 1570
Status: 
Offline
Just a little visual to help understand why this "it's a surge!  It's a spike!!" hysteria is bullshit:



____________________
Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Wed Jul 1st, 2020 04:55 pm
  PM Quote Reply
1015th Post
gwlee7
Hall Of Famer


Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location: Lewisville, Texas USA
Posts: 5413
Status: 
Offline
Deleted post had bad link in it that did something weird



____________________
I just think it's amazing that Trump is really on Twitter all day, personally writing this shit. He's about 3 beers away from joining S&W and getting into a flame war with Ports.----srossi
Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Wed Jul 1st, 2020 05:06 pm
  PM Quote Reply
1016th Post
Blazer



Joined: Sun Sep 4th, 2011
Location:  
Posts: 6713
Status: 
Offline
Lot of truth about kids being socially isolated. Dealing with that situation right now, and it's rough.



____________________
"Well, maybe I like the nightlife just a little bit more than I like the damn gym, jack! And when you're makin' $500,000 a year, there ain't no reason to change what you're doing." - Dusty Rhodes, 1/4/1986
Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Wed Jul 1st, 2020 08:30 pm
  PM Quote Reply
1017th Post
gwlee7
Hall Of Famer


Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location: Lewisville, Texas USA
Posts: 5413
Status: 
Offline
I will try and summarize what the post up there that messed up the board had to say. You guys know that I am a school teacher/support person at an elementary school. And I want to desperately go back to school and be able to work with my kids as much as those of you are parents here want your kids to go back. That said, our school district here in TX just sent out a laundry list of items that the state of TX says it’s going to be supplying for teachers and staff in order for the school to be “safe” to reopen. They basically seem to expecting us to dress like hazmat workers so that the kids can come back. They are supplying us with masks, gloves, and face shields. This makes me wonder exactly how “safe” they honestly think it is. Also, if it is so safe, why are parents being given the option to do distance learning?  If it’s safe, they should be compelled to come like they always have.



____________________
I just think it's amazing that Trump is really on Twitter all day, personally writing this shit. He's about 3 beers away from joining S&W and getting into a flame war with Ports.----srossi
Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Wed Jul 1st, 2020 09:10 pm
  PM Quote Reply
1018th Post
Big Garea Fan

 

Joined: Wed Mar 4th, 2009
Location:  
Posts: 2881
Status: 
Offline
As a father, I am hopeful that the schools here in Maryland will allow parents to continue distance learning if they are leery of sending their children back into classrooms. Maryland only has 1 confirmed COVID death of a person less than 19 years of age so the death numbers do not worry me so much. More concerning to me is the pediatric multi-system inflammatory syndrome which has been reported but there hasn't been many statistics posted about its incidence nor any morbidity/mortality stats. What really concerns me is the possibility of long-term harm and serious sequellae (such as blood clotting disorders, organ failure, etc) resulting from coronavirus exposure which may not be evident until much later in the future. Of course, it will probably take years to prove or disprove whether the maladies actually come to fruition and if they are linked to coronavirus exposure.

My family is probably being extreme cautious about the coronavirus. We have pretty much quarantined ourselves to the house. Fortunately, we have been able to work from home. We do not go out and we avoid putting ourselves in situations where social distancing might be compromised (we get our groceries delivered, do not go out to eat). For exercise, we do participate in karate classes that are held outdoors with approximately 10 feet between participants. 


Part of me wants to send my son back to school in the fall and let him resume his pre-Covid schedule (swim lessons, sports leagues, etc) - especially since most children are not getting sick now. But until more is known about the long term effects, I don't want to risk it - I want to keep him as safe as I possibly can.

Last edited on Wed Jul 1st, 2020 09:15 pm by Big Garea Fan

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Wed Jul 1st, 2020 10:05 pm
  PM Quote Reply
1019th Post
Blazer



Joined: Sun Sep 4th, 2011
Location:  
Posts: 6713
Status: 
Offline
Big Garea Fan wrote: As a father, I am hopeful that the schools here in Maryland will allow parents to continue distance learning if they are leery of sending their children back into classrooms. Maryland only has 1 confirmed COVID death of a person less than 19 years of age so the death numbers do not worry me so much. More concerning to me is the pediatric multi-system inflammatory syndrome which has been reported but there hasn't been many statistics posted about its incidence nor any morbidity/mortality stats. What really concerns me is the possibility of long-term harm and serious sequellae (such as blood clotting disorders, organ failure, etc) resulting from coronavirus exposure which may not be evident until much later in the future. Of course, it will probably take years to prove or disprove whether the maladies actually come to fruition and if they are linked to coronavirus exposure.

My family is probably being extreme cautious about the coronavirus. We have pretty much quarantined ourselves to the house. Fortunately, we have been able to work from home. We do not go out and we avoid putting ourselves in situations where social distancing might be compromised (we get our groceries delivered, do not go out to eat). For exercise, we do participate in karate classes that are held outdoors with approximately 10 feet between participants. 


Part of me wants to send my son back to school in the fall and let him resume his pre-Covid schedule (swim lessons, sports leagues, etc) - especially since most children are not getting sick now. But until more is known about the long term effects, I don't want to risk it - I want to keep him as safe as I possibly can.

My boy hasn't seen his buddies in person since March 13.  Got a text that a couple of dads were doing a baseball get together at the park on Monday.  We decided not to go.  It's just a rough situation.  



____________________
"Well, maybe I like the nightlife just a little bit more than I like the damn gym, jack! And when you're makin' $500,000 a year, there ain't no reason to change what you're doing." - Dusty Rhodes, 1/4/1986
Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Wed Jul 1st, 2020 10:29 pm
  PM Quote Reply
1020th Post
srossi

 

Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: New York USA
Posts: 52750
Status: 
Offline
My son has had 2 play dates with his best friend from daycare at our house.



____________________
This thread was great before AA ruined it.
Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

Current time is 05:01 am Page:  First Page Previous Page  ...  63  64  65  66  67  68  69  70  71  72  73  ...  Next Page Last Page    
WowBB Forums > Sports And Wrestling > General Discussion > Corona Virus...Real or Fake News Top




UltraBB 1.172 Copyright © 2007-2013 Data 1 Systems