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1986 AWA  Rate Topic 
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 Posted: Wed Apr 29th, 2020 06:16 pm
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Spatulapup

 

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How long was Blackjack Lanza a spy for Vince while working for Verne? A couple wrestlers have said this. I think Heenan mentioned this and few others. That's so slimey

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 Posted: Wed Apr 29th, 2020 08:57 pm
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One Fan Gang



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Lanza was doing office work for Verne in the early Pro Wrestling USA days in 1984 as his in the ring duties were winding up. I heard the stories of Jack being a mole going back 25 years ago. If not mistaken, both he and Nick Bockwinkel took over Winnipeg as a market by 1986 from Verne and Jack may have gotten sole oversight later on, at which time he switched to Vince. The first appearance I recall is Lanza at WM3, "sneaking up behind Mary Hart" while she entered the ring, to quote Jesse Ventura's commentary.

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 Posted: Wed Apr 29th, 2020 10:37 pm
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Erick Von Erich

 

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I think Rheingans wrestled once or twice on TV, on Prime Time Wrestling. I remember Bobby Heenan blasting him and saying: "the reason the US boycotted the Olympics was because they knew Rheingans was going to be their coach".



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 Posted: Thu Apr 30th, 2020 12:21 am
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khawk
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I remember one of his first matches he got beat by Tiger Chung Lee. That was a WTF type of loss considering he had only been there a little while, but it spoke volumes about why he was hired in the first place, to hurt Verne.

Last edited on Thu Apr 30th, 2020 12:22 am by khawk

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 Posted: Fri May 22nd, 2020 07:03 pm
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tamalie
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Ultimark wrote: tamalie wrote: I think what hurt the AWA as much as anything was its adherence to outdated booking and TV production formats. The TV show was almost entirely squash matches with a great emphasis on interviews. Angles were few and far between. That made it to a sitting duck once fans had a chance to see other promotions. The AWA was the home team, but I enjoyed the more modern seeming WWF in the mid 1980s and getting to see World Class with its big main events.

The stars slowly drifted away during 1984 and 1985. The final exodus of in their prime stars happened during the first months of 1986. After that the promotion had guys that were too young, were too old, and/or were obvious second division players or lower. Yet even in the face of that, the AWA didn't go to a more modern, angle driven booking style. I don't know if it would have worked, but maintaining the status quo didn't work. Later attempts at innovation came off as amateurish.
I didn't get to see much of the AWA and by the time I did, it was after 86 and they were clearly on their way out.  It is interesting that you note the amount of squash matches.  The WWWF and even the WWF had that same formula as well but I guess spiced things up.  The NWA territories always seemed to have decent matches for TV and furthered story lines on TV.  Basically, Vince just spent them all to death and was probably somewhat fortunate to survive himself.  The NWA and the territories never really represented a united front against Vince and I suspected he knew they never would despite the one effort.  


JCP had a lot of squashes and could drive fans nuts with the "We gotta go!" deal after the main event caliber match they spent all episode hyping up started 60 seconds before the show ended. However, it had the key interviews and angles while the squash matches were broken up by some quality competitive bouts. They used TV to get somewhere. The WWF had mostly squashes but was so good at getting over the pushed wrestler's look, personality, finishing move or hold, and whatever feud he was in. The number of angles was low, but it was like Memphis compared to the AWA and at least they led to big business. The AWA's shows were mostly a bunch of matches with nothing binding together any storylines beyond some very basic issues.

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 Posted: Sat May 23rd, 2020 05:43 pm
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Blazer



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Great summary by Tamalie. JCP really did drive the angles down everyone’s throats. All of their programs were intertwined. To
They’d replay the angles, but most importantly every interview had a purpose to push angles, even if the wrestler wasn’t involved. I’m watching the 8/15/87 Sat Night show and Ivan Koloff comes out, and all he does is talk about the upcoming Flair vs Ronnie Garvin match and the Dusty vs Luger Weaver-lock challenge coming up.



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 Posted: Sat May 23rd, 2020 06:28 pm
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Kriss
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Blazer wrote: Great summary by Tamalie. JCP really did drive the angles down everyone’s throats. All of their programs were intertwined. To
They’d replay the angles, but most importantly every interview had a purpose to push angles, even if the wrestler wasn’t involved. I’m watching the 8/15/87 Sat Night show and Ivan Koloff comes out, and all he does is talk about the upcoming Flair vs Ronnie Garvin match and the Dusty vs Luger Weaver-lock challenge coming up.

It seemed like the rule in every JCP interview was that you had to put over at least three other guys. Ric Flair could start a promo about nothing much, and three minutes later there were four contenders, and you wanted to see every one of them fight Flair.



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 Posted: Wed Jun 10th, 2020 08:58 pm
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tamalie
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Flair pushing three or four contenders was smart on his part because JCP didn't standardize its cards to the point that on each day of the week, the lineups in all cities were the same. He might have matches with Nikita in most cities, but would also face Ronnie Garvin in some, Dusty would take a break from feuding with Tully to get a shot somewhere, and perhaps there'd be a match for a guy like Brad Armstrong in a smaller JCP market like Macon. Flair got that if he went on TV to bang the drum only about Nikita, the fan who was thinking of buying a ticket to see him against someone else might view the bout as unimportant and not worth his time and money. Flair pushed those bouts too and got fans in the house.

Last edited on Wed Jun 10th, 2020 08:58 pm by tamalie

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