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 Posted: Wed Feb 24th, 2021 09:55 pm
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krazykid18
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tamalie wrote: From his rookie season in 1975-76 through 1980-81, David Thompson of the Denver Nuggets was one of the most explosive and exciting players in the NBA as a shooting guard/small forward swing man. He was considered the heir to Dr. J before anyone had heard of Michael Jordan. However, he got into cocaine use late in his rookie season. It was out of control by the late 1970s, impacting his reliability. 

After a subpar 1981-82 season, and well aware of what was going in with his drug use, the Nuggets sent him to the Seattle Supersonics ahead of the 1982-83 season. He bounced back a bit and was voted as a starter in the 1983 NBA All Star Game, admittedly mostly on name and rep rather than performance that season, but the drugs took a deeper hold. During the 1983-84 season, while the Sonics were in New York on a road swing, Thompson had an altercation with a bouncer and either fell or was pushed down a flight of stairs.

The resulting knee injury ended his career. Including his rookie ABA season, in nine seasons he'd played in 5 All Star Games winning MVP honors in the game 2 times, been first team All NBA 2 times, had been second team All ABA and first team All ABA Rookie (by which time the NBA and ABA had comparable talent pools), had come in 2nd and 3rd in separate NBA MVP votes, had finished in the Top 5 NBA scorers 4 times with a another season in 6th and was in the Top 5 of his lone ABA season. When David Thompson played his final game in his 9th and last season as a pro, he was still 29.


Does doc gooden count

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 Posted: Wed Feb 24th, 2021 10:46 pm
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WongLee
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tamalie wrote: From his rookie season in 1975-76 through 1980-81, David Thompson of the Denver Nuggets was one of the most explosive and exciting players in the NBA as a shooting guard/small forward swing man. He was considered the heir to Dr. J before anyone had heard of Michael Jordan. However, he got into cocaine use late in his rookie season. It was out of control by the late 1970s, impacting his reliability. 

After a subpar 1981-82 season, and well aware of what was going in with his drug use, the Nuggets sent him to the Seattle Supersonics ahead of the 1982-83 season. He bounced back a bit and was voted as a starter in the 1983 NBA All Star Game, admittedly mostly on name and rep rather than performance that season, but the drugs took a deeper hold. During the 1983-84 season, while the Sonics were in New York on a road swing, Thompson had an altercation with a bouncer and either fell or was pushed down a flight of stairs.

The resulting knee injury ended his career. Including his rookie ABA season, in nine seasons he'd played in 5 All Star Games winning MVP honors in the game 2 times, been first team All NBA 2 times, had been second team All ABA and first team All ABA Rookie (by which time the NBA and ABA had comparable talent pools), had come in 2nd and 3rd in separate NBA MVP votes, had finished in the Top 5 NBA scorers 4 times with a another season in 6th and was in the Top 5 of his lone ABA season. When David Thompson played his final game in his 9th and last season as a pro, he was still 29.
In the waning days of the ABA and then through the end of the 70's in the NBA, David Thompson was like a god. His numbers were even slightly better than Julius. However, when they matched up head to head, Doc ate him for lunch. Yeah I saw all the great bands in their prime, but seeing the ABA regularly was an otherworldly experience.



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 Posted: Wed Feb 24th, 2021 10:49 pm
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Papa Voo



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krazykid18 wrote: tamalie wrote: From his rookie season in 1975-76 through 1980-81, David Thompson of the Denver Nuggets was one of the most explosive and exciting players in the NBA as a shooting guard/small forward swing man. He was considered the heir to Dr. J before anyone had heard of Michael Jordan. However, he got into cocaine use late in his rookie season. It was out of control by the late 1970s, impacting his reliability. 

After a subpar 1981-82 season, and well aware of what was going in with his drug use, the Nuggets sent him to the Seattle Supersonics ahead of the 1982-83 season. He bounced back a bit and was voted as a starter in the 1983 NBA All Star Game, admittedly mostly on name and rep rather than performance that season, but the drugs took a deeper hold. During the 1983-84 season, while the Sonics were in New York on a road swing, Thompson had an altercation with a bouncer and either fell or was pushed down a flight of stairs.

The resulting knee injury ended his career. Including his rookie ABA season, in nine seasons he'd played in 5 All Star Games winning MVP honors in the game 2 times, been first team All NBA 2 times, had been second team All ABA and first team All ABA Rookie (by which time the NBA and ABA had comparable talent pools), had come in 2nd and 3rd in separate NBA MVP votes, had finished in the Top 5 NBA scorers 4 times with a another season in 6th and was in the Top 5 of his lone ABA season. When David Thompson played his final game in his 9th and last season as a pro, he was still 29.


Does doc gooden count


Yep.  Unlimited potential snorted and smoked away. 



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 Posted: Wed Feb 24th, 2021 10:52 pm
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srossi
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Papa Voo wrote: krazykid18 wrote: tamalie wrote: From his rookie season in 1975-76 through 1980-81, David Thompson of the Denver Nuggets was one of the most explosive and exciting players in the NBA as a shooting guard/small forward swing man. He was considered the heir to Dr. J before anyone had heard of Michael Jordan. However, he got into cocaine use late in his rookie season. It was out of control by the late 1970s, impacting his reliability. 

After a subpar 1981-82 season, and well aware of what was going in with his drug use, the Nuggets sent him to the Seattle Supersonics ahead of the 1982-83 season. He bounced back a bit and was voted as a starter in the 1983 NBA All Star Game, admittedly mostly on name and rep rather than performance that season, but the drugs took a deeper hold. During the 1983-84 season, while the Sonics were in New York on a road swing, Thompson had an altercation with a bouncer and either fell or was pushed down a flight of stairs.

The resulting knee injury ended his career. Including his rookie ABA season, in nine seasons he'd played in 5 All Star Games winning MVP honors in the game 2 times, been first team All NBA 2 times, had been second team All ABA and first team All ABA Rookie (by which time the NBA and ABA had comparable talent pools), had come in 2nd and 3rd in separate NBA MVP votes, had finished in the Top 5 NBA scorers 4 times with a another season in 6th and was in the Top 5 of his lone ABA season. When David Thompson played his final game in his 9th and last season as a pro, he was still 29.


Does doc gooden count


Yep.  Unlimited potential snorted and smoked away. 

He did have a pretty good decade though. The first half a lot more dominant than the second, but that’s true of a lot of pitchers. Then he hung on with the Yankees and Indians and actually managed to keep winning some games even though his electric stuff was gone. 



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 Posted: Wed Feb 24th, 2021 10:54 pm
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Superstar
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Does Droz count? Puked his way out of the NFL and got D'loed out of wrestling.



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 Posted: Wed Feb 24th, 2021 10:54 pm
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Papa Voo



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Who remembers that asinine event of flag football on the beach during Pro Bowl week when Robert Edwards, Patriots rookie running back star, blew out his knee?

Edwards was never the same after that. Came back like two years after injury and played for Miami and then was cut.



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 Posted: Wed Feb 24th, 2021 11:31 pm
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kargol



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Unusual one: Peter Knowles, striker for Wolverhampton Wanderers, who quit the game aged 24 to become a Jehovah's Witness and found playing on Saturday something the imaginary sky pixie declared verboten.

Similarly, Rikky von Opel, Liechtenstein's only F1 driver, who walked away from the sport aged 27 to become a Buddhist monk in Thailand. Although he was pretty rank as a driver, had a Brabham capable of winning races in 1974 but didn't finish higher than 9th.



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 Posted: Thu Feb 25th, 2021 12:29 am
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srossi
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kargol wrote: Unusual one: Peter Knowles, striker for Wolverhampton Wanderers, who quit the game aged 24 to become a Jehovah's Witness and found playing on Saturday something the imaginary sky pixie declared verboten.

Similarly, Rikky von Opel, Liechtenstein's only F1 driver, who walked away from the sport aged 27 to become a Buddhist monk in Thailand. Although he was pretty rank as a driver, had a Brabham capable of winning races in 1974 but didn't finish higher than 9th.

The aforementioned Sandy Koufax refused to pitch Game 1 of the World Series because it fell on Yom Kippur, and the Dodgers lost. Koufax went on to win Games 2, 5, and 7 and was named Series MVP. 



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 Posted: Thu Feb 25th, 2021 02:17 am
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So when Priest Holmes got to the Chiefs he went nuts for his first three years. 4590 rushing yards, 1976 receiving yards, 56 rushing TD's and 5 receiving. His 4th season was heading in the same direction. Through 8 games he had 892 rushing yards, 14 TD's...then his hip was injured...and that was pretty much it. He tried coming back parts of the next few years, but he was a shell at that point.

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 Posted: Thu Feb 25th, 2021 02:35 am
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Muhammad Ali - his refusal to be inducted into the US Army during the Vietnam War resulted in Ali being stripped of his heavyweight boxing title and loss of his boxing license and passport. Ali returned to boxing years later after the Supreme Court ruled in his favor. He regained the heavyweight boxing championship but he missed out on his prime fighting years due to his religious beliefs and his objection to war.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2018/02/19/1968-project-muhammad-ali-vietnam-war/334759002/

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 Posted: Thu Feb 25th, 2021 02:39 am
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Papa Voo wrote: krazykid18 wrote: tamalie wrote: From his rookie season in 1975-76 through 1980-81, David Thompson of the Denver Nuggets was one of the most explosive and exciting players in the NBA as a shooting guard/small forward swing man. He was considered the heir to Dr. J before anyone had heard of Michael Jordan. However, he got into cocaine use late in his rookie season. It was out of control by the late 1970s, impacting his reliability. 

After a subpar 1981-82 season, and well aware of what was going in with his drug use, the Nuggets sent him to the Seattle Supersonics ahead of the 1982-83 season. He bounced back a bit and was voted as a starter in the 1983 NBA All Star Game, admittedly mostly on name and rep rather than performance that season, but the drugs took a deeper hold. During the 1983-84 season, while the Sonics were in New York on a road swing, Thompson had an altercation with a bouncer and either fell or was pushed down a flight of stairs.

The resulting knee injury ended his career. Including his rookie ABA season, in nine seasons he'd played in 5 All Star Games winning MVP honors in the game 2 times, been first team All NBA 2 times, had been second team All ABA and first team All ABA Rookie (by which time the NBA and ABA had comparable talent pools), had come in 2nd and 3rd in separate NBA MVP votes, had finished in the Top 5 NBA scorers 4 times with a another season in 6th and was in the Top 5 of his lone ABA season. When David Thompson played his final game in his 9th and last season as a pro, he was still 29.


Does doc gooden count


Yep.  Unlimited potential snorted and smoked away. 


Then you have to count Strawberry too, don't ya.  
Roy Tarpley is another one who snorted his career away.



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 Posted: Thu Feb 25th, 2021 03:01 am
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some hockey ones:

Valeri Kharlamov-familiar if you were around for the Summit Series in 1972. Died in a car crash in August of 1981 at age 33.

Normand Leveille, 14th Overall pick of the Boston Bruins in the 1981 NHL Entry Draft. Stepped right into the lineup and at the time of his career ending injury in his second season was averaging more than half a point a game at the tender age of 19. In between periods of a game Leveille complained of dizziness and shoulder pain. Suffered an aneurysm and would never play again.

Pelle Lindbergh, goaltender for the Philadelphia Flyers in a single vehicle car accident at the age of 26 shortly after leading the Flyers to the Cup Finals in 1985, losing to the Edmonton Oilers.

Vladimir Konstantinov defenseman for the Detroit Red Wings in a car crash at the age of 30 shortly after winning the Stanley Cup.

Eric Lindros-Everyone knows the Eric Lindros story.  One of the biggest prima donnas to play the game he was immensely talented and one can only imagine what his final stats would look like had he not suffered so many concussions. He retired at 34 but had been a shell of himself for likely 5 seasons or more.   



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 Posted: Thu Feb 25th, 2021 03:02 am
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Papa Voo



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The Ultimate Sin wrote: Papa Voo wrote: krazykid18 wrote: tamalie wrote: From his rookie season in 1975-76 through 1980-81, David Thompson of the Denver Nuggets was one of the most explosive and exciting players in the NBA as a shooting guard/small forward swing man. He was considered the heir to Dr. J before anyone had heard of Michael Jordan. However, he got into cocaine use late in his rookie season. It was out of control by the late 1970s, impacting his reliability. 

After a subpar 1981-82 season, and well aware of what was going in with his drug use, the Nuggets sent him to the Seattle Supersonics ahead of the 1982-83 season. He bounced back a bit and was voted as a starter in the 1983 NBA All Star Game, admittedly mostly on name and rep rather than performance that season, but the drugs took a deeper hold. During the 1983-84 season, while the Sonics were in New York on a road swing, Thompson had an altercation with a bouncer and either fell or was pushed down a flight of stairs.

The resulting knee injury ended his career. Including his rookie ABA season, in nine seasons he'd played in 5 All Star Games winning MVP honors in the game 2 times, been first team All NBA 2 times, had been second team All ABA and first team All ABA Rookie (by which time the NBA and ABA had comparable talent pools), had come in 2nd and 3rd in separate NBA MVP votes, had finished in the Top 5 NBA scorers 4 times with a another season in 6th and was in the Top 5 of his lone ABA season. When David Thompson played his final game in his 9th and last season as a pro, he was still 29.


Does doc gooden count


Yep.  Unlimited potential snorted and smoked away. 


Then you have to count Strawberry too, don't ya.  
Roy Tarpley is another one who snorted his career away.


Yep on Strawberry.
I remember reading about their drug & alcohol plagued careers in this book. 

Attachment: 0EA0AF85-582A-4BA8-BA37-EB42F8BF2578.jpeg (Downloaded 46 times)



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 Posted: Thu Feb 25th, 2021 08:11 am
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freebirdsforever2019



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Angelic Assassin wrote: J.R. Richard-suffered a stroke while playing catch before a game in 1980.Done at age 30.

Lyman Bostock-He quickly became a favorite player of mine playing for the Twins. Shot dead at 27 after 4 seasons. 

Curt Flood-by his own volition really, but all future ball players can thank him for taking a stand.


Mark Fidrych-One great season, then injuries. Done at 26. 

Bostock could hit like the dickens.

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 Posted: Thu Feb 25th, 2021 08:15 am
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freebirdsforever2019



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Angelic Assassin wrote: some hockey ones:

Valeri Kharlamov-familiar if you were around for the Summit Series in 1972. Died in a car crash in August of 1981 at age 33.

Normand Leveille, 14th Overall pick of the Boston Bruins in the 1981 NHL Entry Draft. Stepped right into the lineup and at the time of his career ending injury in his second season was averaging more than half a point a game at the tender age of 19. In between periods of a game Leveille complained of dizziness and shoulder pain. Suffered an aneurysm and would never play again.

Pelle Lindbergh, goaltender for the Philadelphia Flyers in a single vehicle car accident at the age of 26 shortly after leading the Flyers to the Cup Finals in 1985, losing to the Edmonton Oilers.

Vladimir Konstantinov defenseman for the Detroit Red Wings in a car crash at the age of 30 shortly after winning the Stanley Cup.

Eric Lindros-Everyone knows the Eric Lindros story.  One of the biggest prima donnas to play the game he was immensely talented and one can only imagine what his final stats would look like had he not suffered so many concussions. He retired at 34 but had been a shell of himself for likely 5 seasons or more.   

Lindros is the reason on why concussions are taken so seriously now a days. He's a pioneer and has donated more then $10M in research about concussion and the cause & effect behind them. 
The Pelle accident was a shame because the team knew he was a drunk, but never did anything about it. It also happened about 10 minutes from my house at the time.

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