WowBB Forums Home 
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register
WowBB Forums > Sports And Wrestling > General Discussion > Voice of Elmo takes leave due to underage sex allegations

 Moderated by: Ron, brodiescomics, beejmi Page:    1  2  3  Next Page Last Page  
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
Voice of Elmo takes leave due to underage sex allegations  Rating:  Rating
AuthorPost
 Posted: Mon Nov 12th, 2012 08:31 am
  PM Quote Reply
1st Post
sek69



Joined: Fri Dec 21st, 2007
Location: Pittsburgh, PA, USA
Posts: 5488
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
http://www.tmz.com/2012/11/12/elmo-kevin-clash-sex-sesame-street-underage-boy-allegations/

Kevin Clash -- the man known as the voice of Elmo -- has taken a leave of absence from Sesame Street in the wake of allegations he had a sexual relationship with a 16-year-old boy, TMZ has learned ... allegations Clash adamantly denies.

We've learned ... Sesame Workshop lawyers recently met with a 23-year-old man who claims he and Clash began a sexual relationship 7 years ago ... when he was 16 and Clash was 45.

Clash has acknowledged to TMZ he had a relationship with the young man -- but insists it only took place AFTER the accuser was an adult.

Sesame Workshop honchos tell TMZ ... "In June of this year, Sesame Workshop received a communication from a young man who alleged that he had a relationship with Kevin Clash beginning when he was 16-years-old. This was a personal relationship, unrelated to the workplace. We took the allegation very seriously and took immediate action."

Sesame Workshop officials acknowledge to TMZ they met with the accuser twice and had a number of other communications with him.

Sources with direct knowledge of the situation tell TMZ ... after the accuser's initial meeting with Sesame Street, the accuser felt Sesame Workshop's lawyers were trying to muzzle him ... so he lawyered up with Andreozzi and Associates -- the firm that represented one of the victims in the Jerry Sandusky child rape case.

On August 15, 2012 ... Andreozzi fired off a letter to Sesame, accusing the company of trying to "discredit the victim in order to protect its employee and the image of one of its most valuable characters," adding, "This approach places a greater value on a puppet than the well being of a young man."

Sesame Workshop officials tell TMZ ... they conducted a thorough investigation and determined the allegation of underage sex was unsubstantiated. They say they never tried to silence the accuser -- rather they asked for evidence supporting his claim, but he never produced it.

Officials also tell us they're suspicious because the accuser has an email which TMZ obtained -- purportedly sent to him by Clash, acknowledging they had the affair when he was 16. The officials say the accuser never mentioned such an email existed and they believe it's fraudulent.

But there were other emails between Clash and the accuser, and although they don't suggest there was underage sex, officials tell us they disciplined him for inappropriate use of company email.

Sesame Workshop honchos tell TMZ ... "Kevin insists that these allegations are false and defamatory and he has taken actions to protect his reputation. We have granted him a leave of absence to do so."

It is unclear why Clash wanted a leave of absence, since he denies the allegations of underage sex.

As for Clash, the voice actor tells TMZ, "I had a relationship with [the accuser]. It was between two consenting adults and I am deeply saddened that he is trying to make it into something it was not." Clash calls the accusations false and defamatory.

Finally Sesame Workshop officials tell TMZ the puppet is alive and well: "Elmo is bigger than any one person and will continue to be an integral part of Sesame Street to engage, educate and inspire children around the world."


So he admits there was a relationship, just denies it was before the kid turned 18. That's still like a 30 year age difference which is still kind of weird.

Also when conservative moms find out the voice of the most popular children's character of the last decade or so is a gay black man it will make their heads explode like watermelons at a Gallagher concert.



____________________
Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Mon Nov 12th, 2012 09:00 am
  PM Quote Reply
2nd Post
indikator

 

Joined: Fri Jan 23rd, 2009
Location: Bratenwender City, Germany
Posts: 2599
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
I always knew it - Elmo is a gay black man

Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Mon Nov 12th, 2012 10:52 am
  PM Quote Reply
3rd Post
mike3775



Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location: Indiana USA
Posts: 17603
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
now I know why I always despised elmo

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Mon Nov 12th, 2012 10:00 pm
  PM Quote Reply
4th Post
yellowdog



Joined: Fri Mar 5th, 2010
Location: New Bern, North Carolina USA
Posts: 3828
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
Jon Stewart likes to do Elmo impressions.  Might be interesting tonight if they are not already gone on their Thanksgiving break

Last edited on Tue Nov 13th, 2012 01:21 am by yellowdog



____________________
"It's a Dog Eat Dog World"
Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Tue Nov 13th, 2012 12:44 am
  PM Quote Reply
5th Post
Married Jo



Joined: Fri Dec 21st, 2007
Location: Hickory NC
Posts: 7194
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
Our tax dollars at work! :cool:



____________________
Well, Im of the opinion that one wouldnt actually have to eat the corn out of Chynas shit to know that nothing good could come of it. - Portalesman
Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Tue Nov 13th, 2012 07:20 am
  PM Quote Reply
6th Post
sek69



Joined: Fri Dec 21st, 2007
Location: Pittsburgh, PA, USA
Posts: 5488
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
Married Jo wrote:
Our tax dollars at work! :cool:

You're suggesting he paid for the dates with tax money?



____________________
Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Tue Nov 13th, 2012 10:29 am
  PM Quote Reply
7th Post
stone2k



Joined: Mon Nov 29th, 2010
Location: Cambridge, Massachusetts USA
Posts: 8929
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
sek69 wrote: Married Jo wrote:
Our tax dollars at work! :cool:

You're suggesting he paid for the dates with tax money?

Romney sure could have used this info a few weeks ago after one of the debates, when everyone started to post all the memes of Sesame Street characters pissed that he would eliminate some PBS spending... I actually think those memes may actually have really  been a turning point for those on the fence in this last election since there were so many posted everywhere.



____________________
Esoteric verbosity culminates in commutative ennui.

De gustibus non est disputandum
Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Tue Nov 13th, 2012 12:16 pm
  PM Quote Reply
8th Post
mike3775



Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location: Indiana USA
Posts: 17603
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
PBS really does not need tax money to survive. There is no way they are not bringing in millions a year through their billions of "fundraising drives" they do monthly

Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Tue Nov 13th, 2012 12:51 pm
  PM Quote Reply
9th Post
yellowdog



Joined: Fri Mar 5th, 2010
Location: New Bern, North Carolina USA
Posts: 3828
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
mike3775 wrote: PBS really does not need tax money to survive. There is no way they are not bringing in millions a year through their billions of "fundraising drives" they do monthly

PBS definitely needs tax money to survive.  If cuts to Public Broadcasting go through most public TV stations will close.  The only ones that will survive will be the giants like WGBH, KQED, WETA and a handful of others.  Consolidation would be needed, big stations take over little and local service to many, many communities would be lost and replaced with network programming from a few sources.  Much of the documentary work would be eliminated.  Local programming illuminating important, local issues would be gone.  Many of the national shows would be unsustainable because they would not have enough stations paying for content development or acquisition.  PBS would become nothing more than a national cable channel.  TV costs about 5 times as much as radio to produce and operate.

As for NPR, it's much less of an issue.  Public Radio news stations are doing just fine and many would survive federal cuts usually amounting to about 6-8%.  Big market stations would easily overcome that loss, but medium and small markets would be hurt.  In some regards small stations are more inportant than big ones n that those stations is smaller markets play a more significant role because of less competition.

In the end the whole issue is a great big red herring.  The United States ranks LAST among civilized countries in our per capita support of Public Broadcasting.  Even Pakistan spends more for Public Broadcasting than we do.  YOUR annual tax contribution to Public Broadcasting......... less than 3 cents a year.

 

 

Last edited on Tue Nov 13th, 2012 12:53 pm by yellowdog



____________________
"It's a Dog Eat Dog World"
Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Tue Nov 13th, 2012 01:21 pm
  PM Quote Reply
10th Post
srossi
HALL OF FAMER
 

Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: New York USA
Posts: 56718
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
The Sesame Street characters are worth billions and are licensed to or are used as spokesman for everything from the obvious (Fisher-Price) to the not-so-obvious (Radio Shack).  Toys like Tickle-Me Elmo have made more than the GDPs of some countries.  A real Big Bird meme would have him working as the CEO for Goldman Sachs because he makes about the same amount of money.  Although some local public broadcasting companies might need the tax dollars to survive (the larger ones like WNET/13 certainly do not), using the Sesame Street characters as the poster children for that is a joke, and pretending that the show can't exist without tax payer assistance, as many liberals truly believe, just goes to show the overall intelligence and common sense of the average voter.  That show will exist somewhere after a nuclear holocasut takes out the rest of the world.  There are few shows more valuable in television history.



____________________
This thread was great before AA ruined it.
Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Tue Nov 13th, 2012 01:41 pm
  PM Quote Reply
11th Post
yellowdog



Joined: Fri Mar 5th, 2010
Location: New Bern, North Carolina USA
Posts: 3828
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
srossi wrote: The Sesame Street characters are worth billions and are licensed to or are used as spokesman for everything from the obvious (Fisher-Price) to the not-so-obvious (Radio Shack).  Toys like Tickle-Me Elmo have made more than the GDPs of some countries.  A real Big Bird meme would have him working as the CEO for Goldman Sachs because he makes about the same amount of money.  Although some local public broadcasting companies might need the tax dollars to survive (the larger ones like WNET/13 certainly do not), using the Sesame Street characters as the poster children for that is a joke, and pretending that the show can't exist without tax payer assistance, as many liberals truly believe, just goes to show the overall intelligence and common sense of the average voter.  That show will exist somewhere after a nuclear holocasut takes out the rest of the world.  There are few shows more valuable in television history.

PBS does not own the rights to Big Bird.  Sesame Workshop does.  Yes, I'm sure Big Bird will survive, but the stations won't.  As I mentioned the big stations will survive.  The point of pushing Big Bird is the notion that something like Sesame Street (essentially a learning program) would not have been created for commercial TV.  Instead of Sesame Street you'd get Sponge Bob.  I like Sponge Bob but it's hardly helping to educate our children.  Local Public TV stations get nothing from the sales and merchandising of the show except the investment that's put back into the show.  They get no cash.  Big Bird is an icon, but it's much of the rest of the content that will disappear. 

Understand too, that I'm not a big fan of Public TV.  I feel they blew it big time when they refused to enter the cable television business until all of their brands have been poached and made into channels.  HGTV owes it's existence to This Old House.  Discovery to Nova and Nature.  A&E to Masterpiece Theater and on and on.  Even PBS' latest "hit" Antiques Roadshow has led to Pawn Stars, American Pickers, Storage Wars, etc.

I'd prefer Public Radio NOT get federal $$$ because when a legislator with an extreme bias tells us we are not reporting his/her perspective, we can tell them to "fuck off, we're telling the truth" without fear of repercussions that federal dollars would be challenged.  However,  the Public TV system definitely needs this money to survive.

 

 

Last edited on Tue Nov 13th, 2012 02:30 pm by yellowdog



____________________
"It's a Dog Eat Dog World"
Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Tue Nov 13th, 2012 02:27 pm
  PM Quote Reply
12th Post
srossi
HALL OF FAMER
 

Joined: Sun Oct 14th, 2007
Location: New York USA
Posts: 56718
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
yellowdog wrote: srossi wrote: The Sesame Street characters are worth billions and are licensed to or are used as spokesman for everything from the obvious (Fisher-Price) to the not-so-obvious (Radio Shack).  Toys like Tickle-Me Elmo have made more than the GDPs of some countries.  A real Big Bird meme would have him working as the CEO for Goldman Sachs because he makes about the same amount of money.  Although some local public broadcasting companies might need the tax dollars to survive (the larger ones like WNET/13 certainly do not), using the Sesame Street characters as the poster children for that is a joke, and pretending that the show can't exist without tax payer assistance, as many liberals truly believe, just goes to show the overall intelligence and common sense of the average voter.  That show will exist somewhere after a nuclear holocasut takes out the rest of the world.  There are few shows more valuable in television history.

PBS does own the rights to Big Bird.  Sesame Workshop does.  
 


A percentage of all of their deals goes to PBS, and that's a huge pie to take a percentage from.  The average person donating their $20 and getting their tote bag doesn't realize this, they think it's their spare change alone that's keeping PBS alive.  The only thing I can compare it to is the good old Catholic Church, a business that is literally priceless and yet they pass the collection plate and take elderly women's nickels and dimes.  PBS as an entity has money. 

Understand too, that I'm not a big fan of Public TV.  I feel they blew it big time when they refused to enter the cable television business until all of their brands have been poached and made into channels.  HGTV owes it's existence to This Old House.  Discovery to Nova and Nature.  A&E to Masterpiece Theater and on and on.  Even PBS' latest "hit" Antiques Roadshow has led to Pawn Stars, American Pickers, Storage Wars, etc.

I agree with this, and that's bad business and bad businessmen should be allowed to go out of business, whether it's PBS or Citigroup.  Most people on this board know that I absolutely love Ken Burns documentaries, but personally Burns is as full of shit as anyone I've ever heard.  His net worth is estimated at just under $60 million, his docs are cach cows the likes of which few cable stations could ever imagine, and Burns insists that even with his reputation he couldn't do what he does if PBS didn't exist.  Bullshit!  The History Channel just got record ratings with "Hatfields & McCoys" and would be perfect for Burns docs, and I'm sure A&E and a dozen other cable and premium channels would be interested too.




____________________
This thread was great before AA ruined it.
Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Tue Nov 13th, 2012 06:04 pm
  PM Quote Reply
13th Post
yellowdog



Joined: Fri Mar 5th, 2010
Location: New Bern, North Carolina USA
Posts: 3828
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
srossi wrote: yellowdog wrote: srossi wrote: The Sesame Street characters are worth billions and are licensed to or are used as spokesman for everything from the obvious (Fisher-Price) to the not-so-obvious (Radio Shack).  Toys like Tickle-Me Elmo have made more than the GDPs of some countries.  A real Big Bird meme would have him working as the CEO for Goldman Sachs because he makes about the same amount of money.  Although some local public broadcasting companies might need the tax dollars to survive (the larger ones like WNET/13 certainly do not), using the Sesame Street characters as the poster children for that is a joke, and pretending that the show can't exist without tax payer assistance, as many liberals truly believe, just goes to show the overall intelligence and common sense of the average voter.  That show will exist somewhere after a nuclear holocasut takes out the rest of the world.  There are few shows more valuable in television history.

PBS does own the rights to Big Bird.  Sesame Workshop does.  
 


A percentage of all of their deals goes to PBS, and that's a huge pie to take a percentage from.  The average person donating their $20 and getting their tote bag doesn't realize this, they think it's their spare change alone that's keeping PBS alive.  The only thing I can compare it to is the good old Catholic Church, a business that is literally priceless and yet they pass the collection plate and take elderly women's nickels and dimes.  PBS as an entity has money. 

Understand too, that I'm not a big fan of Public TV.  I feel they blew it big time when they refused to enter the cable television business until all of their brands have been poached and made into channels.  HGTV owes it's existence to This Old House.  Discovery to Nova and Nature.  A&E to Masterpiece Theater and on and on.  Even PBS' latest "hit" Antiques Roadshow has led to Pawn Stars, American Pickers, Storage Wars, etc.

I agree with this, and that's bad business and bad businessmen should be allowed to go out of business, whether it's PBS or Citigroup.  Most people on this board know that I absolutely love Ken Burns documentaries, but personally Burns is as full of shit as anyone I've ever heard.  His net worth is estimated at just under $60 million, his docs are cach cows the likes of which few cable stations could ever imagine, and Burns insists that even with his reputation he couldn't do what he does if PBS didn't exist.  Bullshit!  The History Channel just got record ratings with "Hatfields & McCoys" and would be perfect for Burns docs, and I'm sure A&E and a dozen other cable and premium channels would be interested too.




I believe you're wrong about a % going to PBS, but I can't say for absolute certainty.  PBS pays Sesame Workshop for the rights to broadcast the show.  PBS then charges stations carriage fees to broadcast the show. 

Sean HigginsThe Washington Examiner



If you got all your news from the Obama campaign, you'd think Mitt Romney was on the verge of having Bain Capital buy Sesame Street, bulldoze it and turn it into a shopping mall. The Obama campaign even ran an ad Tuesday slamming Romney for his call to end federal PBS funding -- at least until Big Bird and his friends said don't drag us into this.

Well, you can all relax. Big Bird will do just fine even if federal funding for public broadcasting is cut off. In fact, if every PBS station is shut down tomorrow, that wonder-filled yellow fowl will quickly pop up elsewhere on TV.

Don't take it from me. Here's what Sherrie Westin, executive vice president of Sesame Workshop, told CNN last week: "The Sesame Workshop receives very little funding from PBS. So we are able to raise our funding through philanthropic [means and] through our licensed product."

She added: "So quite frankly, you can debate whether or not there should be funding of public broadcasting. But when they always try to [trot] out Big Bird, and say we're going to kill Big Bird -- that is actually misleading, because Sesame Street will be here ... Big Bird lives on."

This raises the question of why Big Bird and his Muppet friends need taxpayer dollars in the first place -- and why this is a controversy at all if they get so little to begin with.

What most people don't understand about Sesame Street is that PBS does not actually produce it. Sesame Workshop is a separate nonprofit entity that owns, produces and licenses the show to PBS. The show's licensing revenue from PBS is nominal -- $1.5 million annually on net, according to Sesame Workshop spokeswoman Ellen Lewis. That's for 26 one-hour episodes, at an annual production cost of $14 million.

Sesame Street is big business by the way. In 2011, it got $45 million in donations for its programming, $47 million from licensing Sesame Street products, and another $42 million in distribution fees and royalties. Sesame's 2011 total revenue was $134 million. About $19 million of that comes from federal sources, only $1.5 million of which is PBS.

Sesame Workshop's total assets are valued at $289 million -- more than Mitt Romney's reported net worth of $250 million. In short, the PBS money is little more than birdseed and cookie crumbs.

So, if it isn't owned by PBS and doesn't need its money, why doesn't Sesame Street just run on a cable channel like the Discovery Network? In fact, it already does. In 2004, Sesame Workshop partnered with Comcast and others to create Sprout, a 24-hour commercial kids channel that you can probably find in the three-digit section of your cable channels.

PBS wants to keep Sesame Street because it is so popular that it helps justify the existence of the entire network. The Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which funds PBS, gets $450 million annually from the government. PBS's own statement reacting to Romney invoked Big Bird without mentioning that it doesn't own him, and in fact spends only a pittance on Sesame Street. In fact, PBS and Sesame Street are also rivals, competing for the same fundraising dollars -- so there's your hint about why Sesame's top brass would contradict PBS this way in public.

Sesame Workshop's Lewis argues that Sesame needs PBS for its audience. "Only 53 percent of low-income children have access to satellite or cable programming [while] public broadcasting reaches nearly every household in America without commercial advertising," she told me.

But the fact that more than half of low-income kids now have cable or satellite TV signals that the rationale for keeping the program on PBS grows steadily weaker every year.

So rest easy, parents. Whoever wins the election, and whether or not they continue federal funding for PBS, we can expect sunny days on Sesame Street as long as there are children to watch it -- wherever it is on the dial.



____________________
"It's a Dog Eat Dog World"
Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Tue Nov 13th, 2012 06:27 pm
  PM Quote Reply
14th Post
yellowdog



Joined: Fri Mar 5th, 2010
Location: New Bern, North Carolina USA
Posts: 3828
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
PBS is hoping that popular shows like Downton Abbey and Sherlock will bring in donations that “help finance other programs like Sesame Street and Sid the Science Kid,” explained a story published in the New York Times on Sunday. Does Sesame Street, with all its branded products on store shelves, really operate near the red?

Yes. Sesame Street and its production company the Sesame Workshop do make a lot of money from product licensing, but not nearly enough to cover expenses. According to the company’s most recent financial report, the Workshop earned about $45 million in merchandising during 2010, which accounted for one-third of its total revenue. The rest came mainly from distribution fees and royalties, and from an assortment of private donors, corporate sponsors, and government grants. That may sound like more than enough to make a puppet-based television show, but according to the same report, the operating expenses for the Sesame Workshop totaled about $133 million, including $37 million for production and development of TV shows at home and abroad; $41 million for production and distribution of non-TV content including apps, home video, and live entertainment; and a hair under $7 million for “Muppet acquisition.” (The remainder goes towards education, outreach, fundraising expenses, and assorted smaller costs.) Only about $4 million comes from PBS annually, and in return PBS recoups some of the cost through progam carriage fees from stations.

The production budget for Sesame Street domestically is about $16 or $17 million per year, which produces about 26 episodes. At less than a million dollars per episode that’s a relative bargain. A cable show like The Walking Dead can cost $3 million per episode.

The Sesame Workshop hasn’t always collected so much revenue from the merchandising of its characters. The show was created using Jim Henson’s Muppets, and through the 1990s money the sales of Sesame Street dolls, playsets, and other toys was split with the Jim Henson Company and a German media group called EM.TV. Then in December 2000 the Sesame Workshop acquired the rights to Oscar the Grouch, Cookie Monster, and the other Sesame Street Muppets for $180 million. International licensing has also grown in recent years, especially as the show has gone global with shows like Plaza Sésamo (in Latin America), Sesamstrasse (in Germany), and Takalani Sesame (in South Africa). When The Sesame Workshop’s revenue grew by 4 percent in 2005, the New York Times noted that this was “primarily because of new income from international licensing.”



____________________
"It's a Dog Eat Dog World"
Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Tue Nov 13th, 2012 06:31 pm
  PM Quote Reply
15th Post
mike3775



Joined: Mon Oct 15th, 2007
Location: Indiana USA
Posts: 17603
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
yellowdog wrote:
mike3775 wrote: PBS really does not need tax money to survive. There is no way they are not bringing in millions a year through their billions of "fundraising drives" they do monthly

PBS definitely needs tax money to survive.  If cuts to Public Broadcasting go through most public TV stations will close.  The only ones that will survive will be the giants like WGBH, KQED, WETA and a handful of others.  Consolidation would be needed, big stations take over little and local service to many, many communities would be lost and replaced with network programming from a few sources.  Much of the documentary work would be eliminated.  Local programming illuminating important, local issues would be gone.  Many of the national shows would be unsustainable because they would not have enough stations paying for content development or acquisition.  PBS would become nothing more than a national cable channel.  TV costs about 5 times as much as radio to produce and operate.

As for NPR, it's much less of an issue.  Public Radio news stations are doing just fine and many would survive federal cuts usually amounting to about 6-8%.  Big market stations would easily overcome that loss, but medium and small markets would be hurt.  In some regards small stations are more inportant than big ones n that those stations is smaller markets play a more significant role because of less competition.

In the end the whole issue is a great big red herring.  The United States ranks LAST among civilized countries in our per capita support of Public Broadcasting.  Even Pakistan spends more for Public Broadcasting than we do.  YOUR annual tax contribution to Public Broadcasting......... less than 3 cents a year.

 

 


WTTW in Chicago, gets SHITLOADS in revenues from donations. Same with the Indianapolis PBS affiliate, along with South Bend( all 3share programming incidentally, if you miss it on South Bend, tune in to Chicago an hour later and it's on again). My friend works for Indianapolis based PBS and he told me they get millions in donations yearly, and that's just from the 25th largest market in the US, and he works in their accounting department, so I doubt he is lying to me.

The Indy PBS also gets millions from sponsorships from businesses as well, which again go into the millions.

PBS is not hurting for money like they love to claim. If they need money so badly, cut the corporate pay structure in half ( WTTW's head earns $670k a year, not bad for a tax payer financed operation IMO)

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

Current time is 10:07 am Page:    1  2  3  Next Page Last Page    
WowBB Forums > Sports And Wrestling > General Discussion > Voice of Elmo takes leave due to underage sex allegations Top




UltraBB 1.172 Copyright © 2007-2013 Data 1 Systems